(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Louisville information .."

459 ? 



L8 L12 |. 

p ilnformatton 



BY THE STANDARD 
PRINTING COMPANY 
LOUISVILLE .-. 1921 



COPYRIGHT 
1921 

PRINCIPAL CONTENTS 
KENTUCKY AND LOUISVILLE 
Historical and other valuable facts concern- 
ing: Automobile Popular Road Trips (23) to 
all parts of the State; Appeal and other Courts; 
Bank Clearings; Board of Trade; Canton- 
ments; Census, U. S.; Colleges and Schools; 
Churches; Counties when made; Democratic 
and Republican Conventions; Democratic and 
Republican State Committees; Depots and 
Train Connections; Distance Between Amer- 
ican Cities; Derby Winners; Elections; Fed- 
eral Land, Federal Reserve and other Banks 
and Trust Companies; Governors; Honor Roil; 
Hotels; Hospitals; Interurban Time Tables; 
Members of Congress and State Legislature; 
New Tax System of Kentucky; Office Build- 
ings; Officials, City; Jefferson County, State 
and U. S.; Police and Postal Stations; Postal, 
Parcel Post Information; Population; War 
Time Louisville; State Fair; Chronological 
History to date; "The World's Greatest 
War;" Truck Routes.alldirections, and several 
thousand other things you should know. 
SEE GENERAL INDEX IN BACK PART. 

PRICE FIFTY CENTS 



— -» 1921 •4^— 1 


JANUARY. 


JULY. J 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


K 


S 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


P 


8 


2 


3 


4 


'5 


'6 


"■J 


8 


'3 


'4 


'5 


6 


'7 


8 


9 


9 


10 




19 


13 


14 


15 


It 


11 


12 


13 


14 


IB 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


n 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


•24 


26 


26 


2- 


28 


29 


30 


30 


31 












31 




.. 










FEBRUARY. 


AUGUST. 1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


fi 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


(= 


9 


in 


11 


12 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


27 


2S 












28 


29 


'" 


31 


:: 






MARCH. 


SEPTEMBER. 1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


8 


6 7 


8 


9 


10 






4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


n 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


27 28 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27 


!! 


29 


30 




APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 1 


'3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


'2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


ft 


10 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 




12 


13 


14 


15 


n 


Ifi 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


n 


1^ 


19 


•jft 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


2- 


28 


29 


30 


23 
30 


24 
31 


" 


26 


27 


28 


29 


MAY. 


NOVEMBER | 


1 


2 


.1 


4 


6 


6 


7 






] 


2 


3 


4 


5 


fi 


9 


IC 


1] 


12 


12 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


n 


12 


15 


16 


n 


It 


It 


20 


21 


13 


U 


15 




17 


18 


19 


ii 


2S 


'24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


2,- 


24 


25 


26 


29 


30 


31 


•• 




•• 


•• 


27 


28 




30 








JUNE. 


DECEMBER. | 










2 


1 3 


4 








.. 1 


2 


3 


6 


( 


: 


I 


i 


If 


11 


4 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


I! 


i< 


15 


Ih 


11 


18 


11 


12 


li 


14 15 


16 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


2; 


2.J 


25 


If 


19 


20 


21 22 


2S 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






25 


2b 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 



IDENTIFICATION 

Full Name 
Residence 
Business Address 
Name of Firm 
My Office Phone is 
City, Town and State 



My Weight Height 

lbs feet inches 

Age 



Zlomplexion. 
IF IN ARMY— 



Rank Co- 



Regiment State 

In case of accident or serious illness please notify 



(Fifth Edition 1921.) 



To Tke Putlic 



We would deem itagreatfavorif any 
one who may possess a copy of this 

BOOK OF INFORMATION 

would call 

The Standard Printing Co. 

Either Phone 3500 

Should they find any errors herein. 

We have endeavored to reproduce 
in this small volume not only in- 
teresting but useful information 
for the benefit of not only Louis- 
ville citizens, but "The Stranger 
within our gates." 

We are under obligations to the 
Louisville Board of Trade, the U. 
S. Government and our city and 
State officials, also the Louisville 
Railway Co., the Louisville Con- 
vention and Publicity League, the 
Louisville Automobile Club and 
all war service activities, etc., for 
certain data supplied. 

Copyright 1921 By 

The Standard Printing Co. 

Incorporated 

LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY 



LouisviLL-E Information 

(Also contains much valuable State [Kentuckyl and Nat ional 
data, see Index.) 



Edited by 
COL. BEN. LaBREE . 

Author "Pictorial Battles of the Civil War," "Confederate 
Soldier in the Civil War," "Official War Records;" 
Editor and compiler, "Notable Men of Kentucky," 
"Notable Men of Cincinnati," "Admiral Porter's 
NavalHistoryoftheCivilWar," "Admiral Raphael 
Semme's," "Cruise of the Sumter and Ala- 
bama," "Kentucky Eloquence, Past and 
Present," "Historical Album Knights 
Templar," "Press Reference Book," 
"Kentucky, and her Progressive 
Men and Industries," etc. 



—1921— 



PUBU I SHERS 

THE STANDARD PRINTING CO. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

3 



LOUISVILLE 
BOARD OF TRADE 



OFFICERS 



Joseph Burge, President 

William Heyburn, First Vice President 

Fred M. Sackett, Second Vice President 

Caldwell Norton, Third Vice President 

R. Lee Callahan, Fourth Vice President 

Robert F. Vaughan, Fifth Vice President 

Oscar Fenley, Treasurer 

AVilliam E. Morrow, Secretary 



DIRECTORS 



Edward Altsheler 
John W. Barr, Jr. 
G. A. Birch 
Joseph Burge 
James Clark, Jr. 
William Heyburn 
Walter I. Kohn 
Clarence R. Mengel 
D. B. G. Rose 
Thomas Floyd Smith 
Alfred Struck 
Robert F. Vaughan 

Louis K. 



Tampton Aubuchon 
Robert W. Bingham 
Alfred Brandeis 
R.L.Callahan 
H.V.Davis, 
Fred W. Keisker 
W. Hume Logan 
Caldwell Norton 
Fred M. Sackett 
W. K. Stewart 
Thomas S. Tuley 
J. B. Wathen, Jr. 



Webb 



g)C!.A608846 



/ 



LOUISVI LLE 
BOARD OF TRADE 



OFFICERS 



Joseph BufRe, President 

William Heyburn, First Vice President 

Robert F. Vaughan, Second Vice President 

J. B. Wathen, Jr., Third Vice President 

D. B. G. Rose, Fourth Vice President 

George R. Ewaid, Fifth Vice President 

Oscar Fenley, Treasurer 

W. E, Morrow, Secretary 



DIRECTORS 



Edward Altsheler 
Tampton Aubuchon 
John W. Barr, Jr. 
G. A. Birch 
William Black 
Russell Broaddus 
Joat'ph Burge 
R.LeeCallahiin 
Jamea Clark, Jr. 
H.V. Davis 
J. M. Emmart 
Cieortce R. Ewald 
WilliuMi H»\vb(Hli 



Fred W. Keisker 
Walter I. Kohn 
C. R. Mengel 

C. Robert Peter 

D. B. G. Rose 
W. K. Stewart 

E. E. Straufl 
C. A. Taylor 
'i'homas S. Tuley 
Robert P. Vaughan 
J. B. Wathen, Jr. 
Louis K. Webb 
Hurvi'.v White 



''The Good 
Old Days" 

By Charles Wheeler Bell 

Makes an ideal gift for 
either a young or an old 
person. 

// IS gotten up in novelty form, 
artistically hound and richly illus- 
trated by Fox, who seems to have 
caught the mental concepts of the 
author and successfully visualized 
them. 

I enjoyed every word of it. 

—-James Whilcomh Riley. 

Price 50 Cents 

mailea Anywhere 
PublisKed ty 

The Standard 
Printing Co. 

I 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 



W^ 



WAR TIME 
LOUISVILLE 

A CITY TO THE FRONT 

IN 

MEN, MONEY AND RESOURCES 



LOUISVILLIANS ENLISTED IN 
THE FIGHT FOR DEMOCRACY 



Men 
RECRUITED THROUGH: 

Regular Army 729 

National Guard (approximate) 1 , 700 

National Army (Selective Service) 6,353 

Training Camps for Officers (Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, 183; estimated through other 

training Camps, 50) 233 

U. S. Navy 2,000 

U. S. Marines 175 

Aviation Service (Aviators, Mechanics, etc) . . . 1,200 

Medical Reserve Corps 204 

Dental Reserve Corps 25 

American League for Preparedness 60 

Red Cross Nurses 106 

Ship Building (enrolled but not all called for to 

date) 2,750 

Number of Louisvillians entering Army and 
Navy prior to War; enlisted in other cities; 
in the Intelligence Service; the Quarter- 
master's Corps; Army Nurses, etc., esti- 
mated at not less than 1,500 

5 



LOUISVIUUE PROVED HER 
AMERICANISM 

Y. M. C. A. Workers: 

Overseas 19 

In America g 

K. of C. Workers: 

Overseas 5 

In America 9 

Red Cross: 

Number sewing units 156 

Women in sewing units 1 ,800 

Number knitting units 248 

Women in knitting units 5,OOo 

Active members Canteen Service 50 

Membership Junior Red Cross 35,000 

Council of Defense: 

Active members 100 

Associate members 720 

Members Selective Service Department 21 

Four-Minute Speakers 250 

Kentucky Home Guards 100 

War Camp Community Service 138 

Louisville Liberty Loan Legion (estimated) 1 ,000 

Women's Liberty Loan Organization (estimated) ... 1 ,000 



LOUISVILLE'S 
DOLLARS IN THE FIGHT 

Fir,tR.d Cross Drive: ^^^ ^ 

Second Red Cos, Drive: ^^^^^^ 

S:,.ed::::::::::::::::::::::::::.- 540,000 

Y.MCA.WarWdrkFund: ^^^^^^^ 

^::;ibed::::::::::::::::::::::::'' ■ 2.4,500 

Knights of Columbus War Service Fund $19,000 

Belgian Relief Fund ^^'^^^ 

Contributions of Louisville citizens to the Fund 
for French Wounded, Armenian Relief 
Fund, and various other agencies connected 
directly or indirectly with war relief are 

estimated at approximately $50 , 000 

First Liberty Loan: ....$5,000,000 

S::.bed;::::::::::::::::::::::: m5o,ooo 

Second Liberty Loan: .S7,775.000 

Quota " ' 

Subscribed 1^,984,000 

Third Liberty Loan: . . . .S7,941,850 

S:^bed;::::::::::::::::::::::: i2,m.soo 

Fourth-Victory Loan: ,16,714,000 

S::ibed.:::::::::::::::::::::::::--s.527,ooo 

War Savings Stamps (Purchased or pledged) . .$2,835,000 

United War Work Drive: 

Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, Jewish 
Associations, Salvation Army, etc.— 
Total number of pledges, 45,927. 

Quota ^587.985 

Subscribed 733.558 



LOUISVILLE SAVING AND SERVING 

Signers of Hoover Pledges 31 ,336 

War Gardens 18,000 

School Children Enrolled in War Gardening 12,194 

Daily Participants in Demonstrations at War 

Kitchen 25 to 30 

Women Engaged in Sewing Depot Work 9,000 




When Seeking a Printer or Publisher 

—SELECT— 

THE STANDARD PRINTING CO. 

INCORPORATED 



HONOR ROLL 

GOLD STAR LOUISVILLE HEROES. 

The following is a list to date of Roins to press of this 
number of LOUISVILLE INFORMATION, of the 
LOUISVILLE and JEFFERSON COUNTY boys, who 
gave up their lives in the cause of Libertv in the WORLD'S 
GREATEST WAR. The list is constantly growing and 
a score or more names may be added to the list in the 1921 
number of this pubUcation: 

Harry Abrams, John W. Allen, Samuel Alsop, Martin N, 
Alvey, Lester A. Arms, Gus Arnold, Rnscoe Ashley, Pierce 
B. Atwood, Lucian Bacon, Richard C. Bagley, Jr., Monty 
E. Bale, Johnnie Belentine, George H. Barnes, Tinis G. 
Barrow, Robert J. Barry, Carl F. Baude, Clyde Berry, 
Emmett Beville, Carl Black, Herbert E. Blakely, Roy 
Blanford, James Blinco, Henry J. Block. Herbert W.Bor- 
land, Elza Boswell, James N. Brennan, Harry S. Brooks, 
Elmer Brown, Sam Buckley. Pierce Bullock, Jr., Charles 
J. Burkel, Theodore L. Burnett, Rhea C. Button, Elmerll 
Byerly, John Cain, William S. Caldwell, Rush 0. Campbe, 
Thomas C. Canary, Frank Carbaugh, James E. Carlile, 
Frank J. Cassin, Robert H. Coleman, Paul B. Collins, Roy 
T. Comfort, Charles T. Costa, Paul K. Cottrell, George 
Crum, Albert Daley, Frank C. Davis, William H. Deyer, 
Miles R. Devore, Gordon DeWeese, August Dicheara, 
Peter J. Dienes, Clarence H. Dobbs, Joseph C. Dodd, How- 
ard J. Dohrmann, Howard Donnelly, Horace Downs, 
Robert M. Doyle, Henry E. Dreher, Robert Dry, Charles 
A. Eads, George R. Eckles, Marvin Eiglebach, Earl E. 
Enzor, Allan E. Escott, Martin P. Fahey, Harry Felsenthal, 
James A. Ferguson, Robert G. Fields, Paul Fihe, Charles 
H. Fink, George Fisher, Louis E. Fisher, Samuel T. Fitter, 
Robert Fleming, Jr., J. A. Forman, George Formsby, 
George E. Foster, Scott B. Foster. Ernest J. Frank, William 
Frederick, Alfred J. Fritz, Edward Frye, William B . Fromme, 
James Gammel, Charles T. Gardner, Edward Lee Garrett, 
Howard Gatewood, Edward S. George, L. George Giboney, 
John W. Goben, Samuel G. Godshaw, Fred Gorham, 
Joseph Otto Goss, Edgar M. Graham, R. G. Graham, 
Hercules Graj^s, Norborne R. Gray, George C. Green, 
Henry A. Greenwald, George Greenwell, Barbour C. Gunn, 
Clifford G. Gustine, Doss B. Haas, Arthur F. Harris, Urel 
Harrod, Arthur E. HajTies, Mrs. Hattie B. Hays, nurse; 
Joseph L. Hays, Edward L. Heinz, James S. Held, Fred W. 
Hellman, Jacob Hemmer, Norbert Henry, Rajinond F. 
Henry, Charles F. Heiser, Jr., Louis P. Hibbs, Ralph M. 
Hicks, Harry Hignight, Herman Hofner, Lee Roy Hoken- 
son, LawT-ence S. Howard, William A. Huber, Joe M. 
Humler, Alex P. Humphrey, Jr., John T. Humphrey, 
Steven E. Hunt, Edward Hussie, Herbert N. Huston, 
George Jackson, Harvey Jewell, Dr. James Johnston, 
John H. Johnson, Louis A. Jones, Edward W. Joyce, Fred 
Kaelin, Arthur A. Kansinger, Lee E. Keith, William L. 
Kelly, Harry F. Kendall. Charles B. Kincaid, Carl C. 



HONOR ROLL— Continued. 

King, Thomas W. King, Elzy Kingery, William Kirk- 
patrick, Carl L. Kirchdorfer, John W. Kline, Jr., Herbert 
A. Kleinjohn, John Kolb, Albert Kraus, Charles Kutz, 
Leroy D. Lamaster, Edward F. Lapp, Harvey Lawi-ence, 
Herbert T. Lawson, John Leisinf, Essex Lewis, Dave H. 
Livic, Harrison P. Locke, Claude Lockhart, DeWitt T. 
Logsdon, Cordie C. Long, Hugh S. Long, Charles Lucas, 
Charles F. Lucian, John W. Lybrooks, James Lyons, 
George E. MeClellan, Charles S. McDonald, Ir^^n B. Mc- 
Dowell, Charles J. McKnight, William McKnight, Joseph 
J. McNenv, James R. Marshall. David Martin. J^e May, 
Carl A. Mercer, James Metcalf, Anthony Metz,B. Meyers, 
Sergt. Hugh Miley, Oliver Miller, Ben J. Mills, L. D. 
Mobley, W. H. Monohan, Sergt. W. F. Montgomery, 
Se^gt. John T. Moore, Winston Morton, Lieut. V. K. 
Mouser, Capt. Albert Mueller, Lieut. Murray Sargent, 
Joe Murray, Lonnie Meyers, Louis Neagli, Askie Neal, 
Tom Netherton, Arthur Nussear, Rollie Oliver, Lieut. 
Carter O^ington, demons Parish, Marion Parker, John 
Parrish, Randolph Peyton, Tom Phillips, Charles Pitman, 
Kenward Piatt, Walter Polk, Simon G. Pontrich, Charles 
Poulter, Saunders Pretty, Louis Probst, Sergt. Richard 
Reh, Charles G. Reilly, Robert Retwisch, Clarence Rich- 
ardson, H. A. Richardson, Preston B. Ridgeway, James 
Rineberger, E. Douglas Roberts, James H. Robinson, 
William Roj'alty, J. M. Russell, Leo J. Ryan, Frank Saun- 
ders, A. B. Sawj-er, T. J. Schaedler, Thomas Schaftlein, 
Louis Scharf, William Schindler, Arthur Schneider, Sergt. 
John Schwartz, Fred L. Schultz, Edward Schweitzer, 
James E. Seaton, James S. Simm, R. L. Skiles, Fred Simp- 
son, Harry K. Smith, Edward M. Smith, Lawrence G. 
Smith, Sanamie Smith, William E. Smith, John Spalding, 
John L. Staib, Andrew Stammerman, Virgil J. Stevens, 
Vannie Stewart, George E. Strapey, Ernest Suddaby, 
Elmer H. Sykes, Samuel E. Thomas, Horrie C. Thompson, 
Eddie Tomes, William Tucker, Jr., Charles Vandergrift, 
Samuel A. Vaughan, George M. Wales, Fred M. Walker, 
Louis Wassman, Hobart Waltrip, Ferd. J. Weber, Walter 
Week, John W. Weikel, Theodore A. Wellendorff, Irvin 
White, Fred A. Whitson, George W. Wihns, Robert E. 
Winkler, William M. Witten, Edward Wittmer, Robert G, 
Wood, Wallace M. Woody, Walter C. Zimmerman. 



10 



WAR HEROES 

KENTUCKIANS (GOLD STAR) IN THE U. S. 

MARINE SERVICE WHO LOST THEIR 

LIVES— As per Roster furnished by 

U. S. Navy Dep't, March 

12, 1920. 

Leslie Herndon Arthur, Maysville; Bishop Smith Bat- 
terton, Paris; Carl Frederick Baude, Louisville; Hugh 
Everett Bolender, Maysville; James Herbert Chism- 
Tompkinsville; James Wallace Costigan, Newport; Cle'o 
Baxter Davis, Bowling Green; McKinley Deaton, Bar; 
bourville; Leroy Harry Delaney, Covington; Sylvester 
DeWitt, Summersville; Martin Eigelbach, Louisville, 
Martin Patrick Fahey, LouisAille; Albert Leroy Gahr, Day- 
ton; Samuel Grazier Godshaw, Louisville; Albert Lowie 
Heinz, Louisville; Joe McFarland Humler, Louisville; John 
Thomas Humphrey, Louisville; Robert Dimmitt Johnson, 
Ft. Thomas; James Bernard Kellum, Maysville; Ernest 
Charles Rudell, Newport; Charles Earl Langley, Big Clifty; 
Douglas Kent Laws, Cecilia; Denver Arnold Lesher, 
Leitchfield; John Joseph McAmis, Covington: Cecil Floyd 
McDonald, Eddyville; Irvin Bryan McDowell, Louisville; 
Jsoeph Edward Moiman, Covington; James Hartford 
Metcalfe, Louisville; William Henry Monahan, Louisville; 
James Thomas Netherton, Louisville; James Ellis 
Osborne, Regina; Percy Sherman Page, Clark; William 
Botts Pangburn, Mt. Sterling; WilUam Brackson Parm- 
ley (formerly of Kentucky), Newton, la.; Stephen Ormsby 
Parrett, Jr., Springfield; John Hilton Parsons, Cynthiana; 
Clyde Aurelius Perkins, Elkton; Tandy Ross Perkins, 
Elkton; Russell Price, Pine Hill, Rockcastle County; 
Ernest Raymond Pursley, Hopkinsville; Albert Lee 
Shearer, Hidalgo; Sherman Sircy, Oakville; Hobart Jones 
Skidmore, Harlan; Enoch Arville Snow, Jr., Walton; Wil- 
liam Rice Spann, Jr. (native Kentuckian), Morristown, 
N. J.; James Harding Sparks, Cynthiana; David Millard 
Troutman, Shepherdsville; Phillip Sheridan Trulrck, Rose- 
burg; Dyson Sterling Veire, Louisville; Edd Biddle Warson, 
Glasgow; Henry Watson, Dover; Fred Andrew Wogomast, 
St. Matthews; William Ferdinand Welch, Clifton; Fred 
Albert Whitson, Louis\aIle; Benjamin Wierman, Lexington; 
Sterling Robert Wilkerson, Covington; Oscar Williams, 
Flat Rock; Noah Stark Wihnot, Finchville; Gilbert Wil- 
liam Young, Springfield; Walter Oscar Zimmerman, Louis- 
ville. 



11 



KENTUCKIANS 

WHO DISTINGUISHED THEMSELVES ON THE 

BATTLEFIELD AND THE SEAS, AND HAVE 

BEEN AWARDED HONORS BY THE U. S. 

AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS 

COMPILED BY 

FRED P. CALDWELL, State Historian 

In compiling the list of KcntucRians who have dis- 
tinguished themselves, Mr. Caldwell adnnts the list is in- 
complete, and explains that the list has been made up of 
the names appearing frcm time to time in the Govern- 
ment's official bulletin, and the list will be constantly 
added to as the names of other Kentuckians who have 
distinguished themselves become known. The list is as 
follows: 

Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman, Frankfort, Ky., knighted 
by King George. Commanded American fleet when 
German fleet surrendered. 

Congressional Medal of Honor 

Lieut. Samuel Woodfill, Ft. Thomas. Ky. Captured 
three machine gun nests. 

Sergt. Willie Sandlin, Hayden, Ky. Captured three 
machine gun nests. 

Distinguished Service Cross 

Maj. Gen. Henry T. Allen, Sharpsburg, Bath county, 
Kentucky. 

Brig. Gen. Preston Brown, Louisville. Ky. 

Maj. Gen. George B. Duncan, Lexington, Ky. 

Private Gordon Adkins, West Liberty, Morgan county, 
Kentucky. 

Lieut. James Vv'. Banks, Morganfield, Union county, 
Kentucky. 

Sergt. Maj. Jackson D. Burke, Maloneton, Greenup 
county, Kentucky. 

Lieut. William C. Dabney, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Capt. Lee S. Eads, deceased, Lexington, Kentucky. 

Private Morris F. Fleitz, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Private E. Carter Koon, deceased, Fredonia, Caldwell 
county, Kentucky. 

Private A. F. Milner, Jr., Georgetown, Ky. 

Private Dick Moorefield, Lafayette, Christian county, 
Kentucky. 

Sergt. George Oiler, Fort Thomas, Ky. 

Sergt. Morton Osborn, Load, Greenup county, Ken- 
tucky. 

Private Ambers Sapp, deceased, Nepton, Fleming 
county, Kentucky. 

Lieut. RajTnond Schoberth, deceased, Versailles, Ky. 

Private Henry G. Schwer, Falmouth, Pendleton 
county, Kentucky. 

12 



Sergt. Millard Smith, deceased, Vox, Laurel county, 
Kentucky. , ^ , ^, 

Sergt. John S. Simpson, deceased. Ready, Grayson 
county, Kentucky. 

Corp. William A. Stapleton, Rush, Boyd county, Ken- 

Capt. Victor H. Strahm, Bowling Green, Ky. An 
ace, six German planes to his credit. 

Sergt. Charles M. Tarter, Adair county, Kentucky. 

Sergt. Stallard Thrower, Parksvillo, Boyle county, 
Kentucky. 

Corp. Lindon Wyatt, Elkatawa, Breathitt county, 
Kentucky. 

French Croix de Guerre 

- Col. Logan Feland, Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Private Bennett C. Gardner, Louisville, Ky. 
Private Henry C. Giles, Anchorage, Ky. 
Private Owen Hisle, Winchester, Ky. 
Private Bullitt McCoun, Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Corp. Wilbur F. Moore, Louisville, Ky. 
Private Peter B Muir. Louisville, Ky. 
Private Adrian Nail, Elizabethtown, Ky. 
Capt. Kelling G. PuUiam, Lexington, Ky. 
Private Harry Ropke, Louisville, Ky. 
Sergt. Shoon, Norwood, Ky. 
Private William Sizemore, Sturgis, Ky. 
Sergt. Joseph Stites, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

French Croix de Guerre, Serbian White 
Eagle and Greek Cross 

Maj. T. Lindsey Blayney, Danville, Ky. 

Decorated By British 

Sergt. Charles Tiu-ner Lanham, Louisville, Ky. 

Red Cord of Legion of Honor 

Maj. James McKenzie Brown, Mt. Vernon, Rock- 
castle county, Kentucky. 

Private L. L. Hopkins, Muir, Fayette county, Ken- 
tucky. 

Private J. Driscoll, Frankfort, Ky. 

Cited or Promoted for Bravery 

Second Lieut. Frank H. Barnwell, Louisville, Ky.; 
cited for bravery. 

Coxswain Frank S. Brown, Fisherville, Ky.; com- 
mended for bravery in rescuing sailor. 

Corp. Marion R. Calmes, Stanford, Ky.; cited for 
bravery in capture of machine gun. 

Private Andrew Charles, a machine-gimner, Phelps, 
Ky.; cited for bravery in manning machine gun. 

13 



Sergt, Ttrmas W. Cknneng^Kutiawa, Ky.; cited fcr 
brav ery in preventing panic. 

Second Lieut. Lecnaid Ccx, Lcuisville, Ey.; cited for 
bravery. 

Private Roy Crenshaw, Hebbardsville, Ky.; cited for 
bravery in delivering messages. 

Private L. Davis, Harrodsburg, Ky.; cited for bravery 
in remaining at combat post. 

Lieut. CoL H. H. Denhardt, Bowling Green, Ky.; 
promoted for bravery. 

Private Martin Eigelbach, Louisville, Ky.; specially 
mentioned as helping captiu-e machine gun. 

Private William M. Exely, Louisville, Ky.; cited for 
bravery. 

Private Aloysius Fawcett, Covington, Ky.; commended 
for devotion to duty. 

Private Williard Felty, Ashland, Ky.; cited for bravery 
in silencing German machine gun. 

Maj. Neville C. Fisher, Georgetown, Ky.; promoted 
for bravery. 

Lieut. Florian D. Giles, Campbellsville, Ky.; cited 
for heroism. 

Ensign W. 0. Harris, Louisville, Ky.; specially men- 
tioned. 

Edgar Johnson, Madisonville, Ky.; commended fcr 
bravery in battle. 

Col. W. 0. Johnson, Louisa, Ky.; made Brigadier Gen- 
eral for bravery in action . 

Sergt. William L. Kouns, Curve, Ky.; cited for heroism. 

Corp. Hughes, Bowling Green, Ky.; cited for bravery. 

Leo P. Linneman, deceased, Co\'ington, Ky.; specially 
mentioned for bravery in capture of machine gun. 

Sergt. Dewey McCord. Hopkinsville, Ky.; decorated 
for bravery. 

Corp. Dewey Matherley, Harrodsburg, Ky.; com- 
mended for volunteering services . 

Lieut. Col. John Montgomery, Elizabethtown, Ky.; 
promoted to Colonel for bravery. 

Sergt . James Munson ; cited for bravery. 

Corp. Joseph M. O'Brien, Earlington, Ky.; cited for 
distinguished service on battlefields. 

Lieut. Carl Rauterburg, Louisville, Ky.; recommended 
for Distinguished Service Cress. 

Private James A. Rice, Ashland, Ky., cited for bravery. 

Private William P. Ringo, Owensboro, Ky.; cited 
for bravery. 

Henry T. Stanton, III. Frankfort, Ky.; cited for 
bravery. 

Private Jacob Sutton, Nebo, Ky. ; cited for bravery. 

Second Lieut. William G. Watson, Glasgow, Ky.; 
cited for bravery. , t^ , 

Robert Winkler, Louisville, Ky.; commended by French 
General for bravery. 

Sergt. Rufus Atwood, Hickman, Ky.; cited for bravery. 



14 



DATES WHEN NATIONS WENT TO WAR; 
41,113,650 IN OPPOSING ARMIES. 

Principal Date Men 

COUNTRY War Was Declared Under Arms 

Austria-Hungary July 28, 1914. . . . 3,000,000 

Belgium Aug. 4, 1914. . . . 300,000 

Brazil Oct. 26, 1917. . . . 45,000 

Bulgaria Oct. 14,1915.... 300,000 

China Aug. 14, 1917. . . . 540,000 

Cuba April 7, 1917. . . . 11,000 

France Aug. 3, 1914. . . . 6,000,000 

Great Britain Aug. 4,1919.... 5,000,000 

Germany Aug. 1, 1914. . . . 7,000,000 

Greece Nov.28, 1916. . . . 300,000 

Haiti July 15, 1918. . . . 20,000 

Italy May 24, 1915. . . . 3,000,000 

Japan Aug. 23, 1914. . . . 1,400,000 

Liberia Aug. 4, 1917. ... 400 

Montenegro Aug. 8,1914.... 40,000 

Panama April 1, 1917. ... 250 

Portugal Nov.23, 1914. . . . 200,000 

Roumania Aug. 27, 1916. . . . 320,000 

Russia Aug. 1,1914.... 9,000,000 

San Marino '. May 24, 1915.... 1,000 

Serbia July 28, 1914. . . . 300,000 

Siam July 22, 1917.... 36,000 

Turkey Nov. 3,1914.... 300,000 

United States (German) April 6, 1917. ... 4,000,000 

United States (Austrian) Dec. 7, 1917 

Total men 41 , 113,650 

For Central Powers 10,600,000 

For Allied Powers 30,513,650 



15 



KENTUCKY CASUALTIES IN THE WORLD WAR 

Kentuckians to the number of 5,380 were casualties 
in the great war, according to revised figures of the War 
Department, which show that of the total number 1,479 
paid the supreme price. Of the total number of casuals 
139 were officers. 

The official tabulation of dead, 
oners follows: 



Killed in action 

Died of wounds 

Died of disease 

Died of accident 

Drowned 

Suicide 

Murder or homicide 

Execution, general 

court-martial 

Other known causes 

Cause undetermined 

Presumed dead 

TOTAL DEAD 

Died prisoners 

Repatriated prisoners 

Total prisoners 

Wounded slightly 

Wounded severely 

Wounded, degree undetermined . 
Total wounded 



Totals 139 5,241 



woundec 


I and pris- 




Enlisted 


'fficers. 


Men. 


23 


584 


3 


245 


11 


440 





36 


6 




1 


2 


9 




1 




13 




41 




16 




43 


1,436 


2 




2 


56 


2 


58 


34 


1,403 


44 


1,067 


16 


78 


94 


3,790 



16 



STATE OFFICIALS 
Executive Office 

Edwin P. Morrow, Governor (House and) $6 , 500 

McKenzie R. Todd, Private Secretary 2,000 

8. Thruston Ballard, Lieutenant Governor (per day 
during Legislative Sessions) 10 

Executive Marshal 

(Act 1914.) 
John Dillon, Marshal SI, 350 

Secretary of State's Office 

Fred A. Vaughan, Secretary of State S4 , 000 

R. L. Stewart, Assistant Secretary of State 1 ,800 

Adjutant General's Office 

James M. DeWeese, Adjutant General S2,000 

Isaac Wilder, Assistant Adjutant General 1 ,500 

Confederate Pension Department 

(Acts 1912-14) 
W. J. Stone, Commissioner S2 , 500 

State Inspector and Examiner's Office 

Henry E. James, Inspector and Examiner $3,000 

State Department of Mines 

Lawson Blinkensopp, Chief Inspector, 

Lexington, Ky $1,800 

Auditor's Office 

John J. Craig, Auditor $3,600 

Arthur L. Doyle, Assistant Auditor 2,000 

Land Office 

Wm. Booth, Clerk. 

State Insurance Commissioner 

J. F. Ramey, Insurance Commissioner $3 ,600 

Marion Cornell, Deputy Commissioner 2,000 

Fire Prevention and Rating Department 

J. Al. Steltenkamp, Superintendent . 
Ben W. Hall. 
W. T. Short. 
A. F. Van Hoose. 
Ray Camentz. 
W. T. Vance. 
Elizabeth Warren. 

17 



state Treasurer's Office 

James A. Wallace, Treasiirer S3, 600 

A. B. Hammond, Assistant Treasurer. 
Attorney General's Office 

Charles I. Dawson, Attorney General $4,000 

W. T. Fowler, First Assistant Attorney General 3,500 

T. B. McGregor, Second Assistant Attorney General. 3,500 

Charles E. Logan, Third Assistant Attorney General. 2,400 

Department of Education 

George CoMn, Superintendient $4 .000 

L. N. Taylor, Assistant. 

State Board of Education 
George Colvin, Superintendent, Chairman. 
Fred A. Vaughan, Secretary of State. 
Charles I. Dawson, Attorney General. 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
George Colvin, Frankfort, Chairman. 
Warren Pej^on, Fordsville. 
C. 0. Ryan, Lawrenceburg. 
KENTUCKY EDUCATIONAL SURVEY BOARD 

(Appointed April 19, 1920) 
Dr. W. A. Ganfield, Rep., Danville, Ky., President of 
Centre College. 

C. J. Hayden.Dem., Springfield, Ky., President Spring- 
field Board of Education. 

Alex. Barret, Rep., Louisville, Ky., Member Louisville 
Board of Education. 

J. L. Harmon, Dem., Bowling Green, Ky., Vice- 
President Bowling Green Business College. 

Miss Kate McDaniel, Rep., Hopkinsville, Ky. 

STATE SCHOOL SUPERVISORS 
R. P. Green, Hish Schools. 
F. C. Button, Rural Schools. 
J. V. Chapman, Rural Schools. 
H. P. Hopkins, Rural Schools. 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION BOARD 
(Main Office, Frankfort"! 
Ahas S. Bennett, Chairman. 
Clyde R. Levy. 
Felix Ehimas. 
Members of the State Board of Veterinary Examiners 
W. C. Hanna, Frankfort, President. 
Dr. R. B. Smoot, Madisonville. 

State Commissioner of Agriculture 
Wm. Calloway Hanna. Commissioner of Agriculture, 

Labor and Statistics S2,500 

State Labor Department 
State Labor Inspector, P. W. Fillburn. 
State Immigration Agent — J. M. Puckett. 
Woman Labor Inspector — Mrs.- Pansy Denunzio. 

18 



Sinking Fund Commission 

Governor Edw. P. Morrow, Chairman. 

Attorney General C. I. Dawson. 

Treasurer J. A. Wallace. 

Auditor J. Craig. 

Secretary of State F. A. Vaughan. 

Members. 

State Board of Agriculture 

Wm. C. Hanna, Chairman, ex-officio member. 
State Live Stock Sanitary Board 

Wm. C. Hanna, Chairman. 

Thomas Cooper. 

E. S. Good. 

Dr. S. L. Musselman, State Veterinarian. 

Dr. F. 0. Schneider, Assistant State Veterinarian. 

Kentucky State Fair 

(Louisville Office, Republic Bldg., Fifth and Walnut Sts.) 
W. C. Hanna, Commissioner of Agriculture. 

G. Carney Cross, Secretary $2 , 500 

G. C. Demeree, Superintendent of Grounds 1 ,500 

State Tax Commission 

J. A. Scott, Chairman $3 , 600 

L. R. Davis 3,600 

Rainey T. Wells 3,600 

Department of Public Roads 

J. S. Boggs, Commissioner $3,000 

State Board of Charities and Corrections 

(Created by Act of Legislature in March 1920, appoint- 
ment of members of the Board by Governor Morrow, 
March 9, 1920.) 

Chairman, Edward R. Hines, Louisville, Dem. 

Fred M. Sackett, Louisville, Rep. 

Miss Lafon Riker, Harrodsburg, Rep. 

Dr. Samuel H. Halley, Lexington, Dem. 

Henry P. Barret, Henderson, Dem. 

Miss Lucy Blythe Simms, Paris, Dem. 

Emil Tachau, Louisville, Rep. 

B. T. Brewer, Louisville, Secretary. 

Railroad Commissioners 

Frank N. Burns, Dem., First District $3,600 

J. S. Cooper, Rep., Second District 3,000 

E. C. Kash, Rep., Third District 3 .000 

State Board of Election Commissioners 

W. Heyburn, Rep., Louisville. 

James H. Polsgrove, Dem., Frankfort. 

Roy B. Speck, Clerk Court of Appeals, Referee. 

Mrs. H. S. Vansant. Secretary, Frankfort, salary $200. 

(The Election Commissioners receive $5 per day, not to 
exceed $100 per annum.) The Commissioners are appointed 

19 



for a term of one year by the Governor on recommendation 
of the committee of the two leading political parties of the 
btate who serve with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals 
as referee The State Commissioners appoint one com- 
missioner from each of the two parties on recommendation 
ol the county committees, who serve with the sheriff of 
the county, and appoint the election officers. 

Court of Appeals 

John D. Carroll, Chief Justice S^i nnn 

W. E. Settle, Justice ^f 'ggj 

Flem D. Sampson, Justice " n 'nnn . 

Rollin Hurt, Justice ^'nnn 

Gus Thomas, Justice .'.".'.■.'.'.■.■.■.■ 5 OOO 

Ernest Clarke, Justice :; 'nnn 

Houston Quinn .'.'.'.'.■■.■.■.■.■.■ 5 ooo 

Wm. Rogers Clay, Commissioner of Appeals . ...... 5, 000 

Clerk of Court of Appeals 
Roy B. Speck, Clerk u nnn 

Joe Wood, Deputy Clerk. ' " 

Ed. Allen, Deputy Clerk. 

State Library 

Mrs. Grace Garret Hendrin, Librarian $1 800 

Mrs. Maude T Marcum, Assistant Librarian .' 1 ,500 

Miss May Nell, Bookkeeper 900 

State Custodian 

M. E. Lee $1 200 

(Appointed by Sinking Fund Commission.) ' 

/A X ,n,. Motor Vehicle Department 

T^ w ^TA "^P^^i^M ^y Sinking Fund Commission.) 
T. W. Woodward, Chief Clerk j2,400 

Sinking Fund Commission 

Governor E. P. Morrow, Chairman. 
Attorney General Charles L. Dawson. 
Treasurer James A. Wallace. 
Auditor John J. Craig. 
Secretary of State Fred A. Vaughan. 

Printing Commissioner 

Moses R. Glenn, Commissioner $1 500 

(Appointed by the Sinking Fund Commissioners, Act 1906.) 

Kentucky State Library Commission 
Members of Commission 

Mrs. Herbert W. Mengel, Louisville, Chairman. 
Mrs. Nat B. Sewell, Frankfort 
A. H. Hill, Franklin. 
Henry Burnett, Louisville. 
Rev. E, L. Powell, Louisville. 

20 



state Board of Health of Kentucky 

(Act April 20, 1893.) 

Dr. John G. South, Frankfort, President. 

Dr. J. N. McConnack, Louisville, Director of Sani- 
tation. 

Dr. P. E. Blackerby, Louisville, Director of Vital 
Statistics. 

Dr. Lilian H. South, Louisville, Director of Bacteri- 
ology. 

Dr. J. G. Furnish, Louisville, Director Pure Food and 
Drugs. 

Dr. A. T. McCormack, Louisville, Secretary. 

State Board of Pharmacy. 

(Established Act 1874.) 
J. W. Gayle, Frankfort, Secretary. 

State Board of Embaimers 

(Established by Act, March 22, 1904.) 
M. F. Jewett, Glasgow, President. 

B. M. Slaton, Madisonville. 
John Schildt, Louisxille. 

C. H. Boden, Louis\ille. 
R. L. Shannon, Secretary. 

State Penal Institutions 

State Reformatory, Frankfort, William H. Moyer. 

State Penitentiary, Eddyville, J. B. Chilton. 

State House of Reform, Greendale, Major H. B. Hick- 
man. 

State House of Reform for Girls, Pine Bluff, Mrs. 
Harry Bishop, Chairman. 

State Hospitals for the Insane 

Eastern Hospital, Lexington, Dr. Jos. A. Goodson, 
Supt. 

Central State Hospital, Lakeland, Dr. Walter A. Jjlson, 
Supt. 

Western State Hospital, Dr. F. G. La Rue, Supt. 

Kentucky Institution for Feeble Minded Children, 
Frankfort, Dr. T. L. Taylor, Act. Supt. 

State Board of Geology and Forestry 

(Established by Act of 1912.) 
Commissioner, W. R. Jillson $3,000 

Department of Banking 

(Established by Act of 1912.) 

James P. Lewis, Commissioner $3 , 600 

W. W. Peevhouse, Deputy Commissioner 2 ,500 

L. M. Vance. Greensburg, State Bank Examiner. 
John Dillon, Secretary. 

21 



state Game and Fish Commission 

(Established by Act of 1912.) 

Dr. R. F. Tuttle, Executive Agent $2,. 500 

Claude Meredith, Bowhng Green, Game Warden. 

Members of Board. 

Alanson Trigg, Glasgow. 
Richard McGraw, Covington. 
J. M. Richardson, Somerset. 
Ray Moss, Pineville. 

State Racing Commission 

(Act 1906.) Term 4 years. 
J. N. Camden, Versailles, Chairman. 

"Old Kentucky Home" Commission. 

Robert W. Bingham, Louisville. 
C. Lee Cook, Louisville. 
A. T. Hert. Louisville. 
Young E. Allison, Louisville. 
Arch H. Pulliam, Bardstown. 
Mrs. Clement French, Maysville. 
Harry Giovanoli, Lexington. 

State Athletic Board of Control 

Office, Louisville, Ky 

Frank B. Russell, Chairman. 

Charles F. Grainger, Vice Chairman. 

Harvey White. 

Robert D. Anderson, Secretary. 

Kentucky Tuberculosis Association. 

C. L. Adler, Louisville, President. 

Mrs. Desha Breckinridge. Lexington, First Vice- 
President. 

Dr. M. Pennington, Mt. Vernon, Second Vice- 
President. 

Dr. J. S. Lock, Executive Secretary. 

Miss Jessie 0. Yancey, Educational Secretary. 

Marian Williamson, R. N. State Supervising Nurse. 

State Historical Society. 

Governor E. P. Morrow, President. 

H. V. McChesney, First Vice-President and Editor of 
Register. 

Dr. Edgar E. Hume, Second Vice-President. 

Mrs. Listet Witherspoon, Third Vice President. 

Mrs. Jouett Taylor Cannon, Regent, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Wm. E. Railey, Librarian. 

State Capitol Employes. 

Wm. McKinney, Electrician. 

John Showaler, Engineer. 

Wm. Harper, Day Watchman. 

W. M. Stewart, Night Watchman. 

22 



Governor Morrow's Staff. 

Hert, Alvin T Louisville, Ky. 

Moriaritv, C. R Covington, Ky. 

Ryan, C. H Russellville, Ky. 

Langley, John W , Pikeville, Ky. 

Robsion, J. M Barbourville, Ky. 

Ogden, Charles H Louisville, Ky. 

Swope, King Danville, Ky. 

Franks, E. T Owensboro, Ky. 

Smith, George Weissinger Louisville, Ky. 

Smith, Thomas Floyd Louisville, Ky. 

Ernst, Richard P Covington, Ky. 

Heyburn, William Louisville, Ky. 

Galvin, Maurice Covington, Ky. 

Searcy, Cheslev H Louisville, Ky. 

Bennett, Alvis H Hartford, Ky. 

Chilton, Matt J Louisville, Ky. 

Lucas, Robert H Louisville, Ky. 

Segner, Charles A Louisville, Ky. 

Petty, Ludlow F Louisville, Ky. 

Burlingame, Paul Louisville, Ky. 

McCulloch, John W Louisville, Ky. 

Stephens, George E Frankfort, Ky. 

Brown, Hewett Louisville, Ky. 

Coldiron, John F Catlettsburg, Ky. 

Hawes, R. L Louisville, Ky. 

Anderson, R. D Louisville, Ky. 

Townsend, Oliver Louis\'ille, Ky. 

Humphrey, A. W Ashland, Ky. 

Morgan, Jesse Hazard, Ky. 

Starkey, Mody Pine\dlle, Ky. 

Spahr, Asa Winchester, Ky. 

Snook, S.J Owensboro, Ky. 

Morris, Andrew H Louisville, Ky. 

Dixon, Thurman B Scotts\alle, Ky. 

Stevenson, Walker W Ashland, Ky. 

Carpenter, Rex. G Lexington, Ky. 

Yager, J. Wood Lagrange, Ky . 

Johnson, Alex E Louisville, Ky. 

McGuire, Henry Winchester, Kv. 

Bradley, T. P Louisville, Ky. 

Denumbram, J. H Horse Cave, Ky. 

Jett, Joseph Carrollton, Ky. 

Humble, Perry Glasgow, Ky. 

Howard, Clay Paris, Ky. 

Russell, Frank B Louisville, Ky. 

Reno, Lawson Owensboro, Ky. 

Smith, Sawyer A Barbourville, Ky. 

Fields, D. D Whitesburg, Ky. 

Steele, Harvey London, Ky. 

Alexander, Younger Lexington, Ky. 

Owsley, Thomas M Lexington, Ky. 

Shearer. Logan Lexington, Ky. 

Hansford, William B., Jr West Milton, 0. 

Crabbe, J. G Greeley, Colo, 

Watterson, Henry Louisville, Ky. 

23 



Rose, D. B. G Louisville. Ky. 

Nuetzel, Fred. Louisville, Ky. 

McRea, J. D Louisville, Ky. 

King, J. Campbell Louisville, Ky. 

Vanarsdell, H Loui&ville, Ky. 

Russell, J. Barbour Maysville, Ky. 

Lamkin, Ed Warsaw, Ky. 

Sargeant , John Bellevue, Ky. 

Weddington, W. H Coal Run, Ky. 

Templin, J. D Middlesboro, Ky. 

Asher, T. J Pineville, Ky. 

Dailey, Eugene M Louisville, Ky. 

White, Harvey Louisville, Ky. 

Cassaday, John A Somerset, Ky. 

McReynolds, T. J Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Renshaw, Edgar Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Grain, M. S Jackson, Ky. 

Ferguson, S. C Prestonburg, Ky. 

Taylor, Philip P Norfolk, Va. 

Grooms, Hugh L Fountain Run, Ky. 

Mason, A.J Central City, Ky. 

Lewis, S. E Ludlow, Ky. 

Haley, 0. A Ludlow, Ky. 

Tuney, William Ludlow, Ky. 

Densen, W. J Ludlow, Ky. 

Dorley, Edward Ludlow, Ky. 

Langford, William Ludlow, Ky. 

Haney, J. E Ludlow, Ky. 

McCarty, M. F Ludlow, Ky. 

Rohan, M Ludlow, Ky. 

Loyall, J. M Ludlow, Kv. 

Simcox, B. T Ludlow, Kv. 

McGraw, B. D Ludlow, Ky. 

Quinlan, Thomas Ludlow, Ky. 

Mitchell, CM Danville, Ky. 

Rohan, Thomas Ludlow, Ky. 

Offut, John Somerset, Ky. 

Higgins, J. W Somerset, Ky. 

Griffin, T. R Somerset, Ky. 

Throckmorton, John W Lexington, Ky. 

Morris, Jackson Pineville, Ky. 

Dixon, Thurman Scottsville, Kv. 

Hansford, E. H Troy, Ohio 

RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS— DISTRICTS. 

First District —Counties of Meade, Hardin, Larue, 
Hart, Metcalfe, Barren, Monroe, Allen, Simpson, Warren, 
Edmonson, Grayson, Breckenridge, Hancock, Ohio, Butler, 
Logan, Todd, Muhlenberg, McLean, Daviess, Henderson, 
Webster, Hopkins, Christian, Trigg. Caldwell, Lyon, 
Crittenden, Livinaston, Union, Marshall, Calloway, Graves, 
McCracken, Ballard, Hickman, Fulton and Carlisle. 
Frank N. Burns, Dem. 

Second District— Counties of Gallatin, Owen, Scott, 
Fayette, Jessamine, Pulaski, Wayne, Clinton, Russell, 

24 



Casey, Linclon, Garrard, Boyle, Mercer, Anderson, Wood- 
ford, Franklin, Henry, Oldham, Carroll, Trimble, Jeffer- 
son, Shelby, Spencer, Bullitt, Nelson, Washington, Marion, 
Taylor, Green, Adair and Cumberland. J. S. Cooper, Rep. 

Third District — Counties of Boone, Kenton, Grant, 
Harrison, Bourbon, Clark, Estill, Madison, Jackson, 
Laurel, Rockcastle, Whitley, Knox, Bell, Harlan, Leslie, 
Perry, Letcher, Floyd, Pike, Martin, Johnson, Breathitt 
Clay, Owsley, Lee, Powell, Montgomery, Bath, Nicholas, 
Fleming, Robertson, Pendleton, Bracken, Campbell, Lewis, 
Mason, Greenup, Rowan, Carter, Elliott, Boyd, Lawrence, 
Morgan, Magoffin, Wolfe, Menifee and Knott. E. C. 
Kash, Rep. 

The Commissioners receive a salary of $3,000, except 
the Chairman, who receives S3,600. 

APPELLATE COURT. 
Chief Justice— John D. Carroll. 

First District— Ballard, Carlisle, Hickman, Fulton, 
Graves, McCracken, Calloway, Marshall, Livingston, Lyon, 
Trigg, Caldwell, Crittenden, Union, Webster, Hopkins, 
Muhlenberg and Christian. 

Judge — Augustus Thomas, Mayfield, Democrat. 

Second District— Henderson, McLean, Daviess, Han- 
cock, Breckenridge, Ohio, Grayson, Butler, Edmonson, 
Warren, Allen, Simpson, Logan, Todd, Monroe and Meade. 

Judge — W. E. Settle, Bowling Green, Democrat. 

Third District— Hardin, Bullitt, Nelson, Washington, 
Marion, Spencer, Larue, Hart, Green, Taylor, Adair, Met- 
calfe, Barren, Clinton, Wayne, Russell, Casey, Shelby, 
Oldham, Anderson, Pulaski and Ciunberland. 

Judge — •Rollin Hurt, Columbia, Democrat. 

Fourth District— Jefferson. 

Judge— Huston Quin, Louisville, Republican. 

Fifth District— Trimble, Henry, Carroll, Gallatin, 
Owen, Scott, Franklin, Bourbon, Fayette, Woodford, 
Garrard, Boyle, Jessamine, Madison, Mercer, Lincoln, 
Rockcastle and Jackson. 

Judge— John D. Carroll, New Castle, Democrat. 

Sixth District— Boone, Campbell, Kenton, Grant, Har- 
rison, Pendleton, Bracken, Robertson, Nicholas, Mason, 
Fleming, Lewis, Greenup, Carter, Rowan, Bath and Elliott. 

Judge — Ernest Clarke, Falmouth, Democrat. 

Seventh District— Clark, Montgomery, Powell, Meni- 
fee, Bell, Harlan, Leslie, Lee, Breathitt, Perry, Letcher, 
Knott, Pike, Floyd, Magoffin, Wolfe, Morgan, Lawrence, 
Boyd, Johnson, Martin, Owsley, Laurel, Eiox, Whitley, 
Estill and Clay. 

Judge — F. D. Sampson, Barbourville, Republican. 

Wm. Rogers Clay, Commissioner of Appeals, Lexing- 
ton, Democrat. 

Terms— Eight years. Salary-y«5,000. 

Each Judge serves as Chief Justice the last two years 
of his term. 

25 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF KENTUCKY. 
SENATORIAL DISTRICTS AND SENATORS. 

First District— Fulton, Graves and Hickman. B. T. 
Davi'^, Hickman, Farmer, Lawyer, Democrat. 

Second District— Ballard, Marshall, McCracken and 
Carlisle. T. T. Gardner, Bardwell, Banker, Fanner, 
Democrat. 

Third District— Calloway, Lyon, Livingston and Trigg. 
H. P. Atwood, Cadiz, Garage Proprietor, Democrat. 

Fourth District — Caldwell, Crittenden and Webster. 
C. S. Nunn, Marion, Lawj^er, Democrat. 

Fifth District— Henderson and Union. S. L. Marshall, 
Henderson, Law>'er, Farmer, Democrat. 

Sixth District- Christian and Hopkins. Frank Rives, 
Hopkinsville, Lawj'er, Democrat. 

Seventh District — Butler, Muhlenberg and Ohio. 
George Baker, Central City, Mine Worker, Republican. 

Eighth District — Daness and McLean. Dr. J. L. 
Early, Stanley, Druggist, Physician, Republican. 

Ninth District— Logan, Simpson and Todd. Whitsett 
Hall, Auburn, Farmer, Democrat. 

Tenth District— Breckinridge, Hancock and Meade. 
Dr. S. P. Parks, Irvington, Physician, Republican. 

Eleventh District — Allen, Edmonson and Warren. A. 
A. Demunbrun, Farmer, Republican. 

Twelfth District— Bullitt, Grayson and Hardin. 
Haynes Carter, Elizabethtown, Lawj-er, Democrat. 

Thirteenth District— Green, Hart and Larue. A. E. 
Auxier, Pikeville, Law>-er, Republican. 

Fourteenth District— Nelson, Shelby and Spencer. 
J. A. Hinkle, Bloomfield, Merchant, Democrat. 

Fifteenth District — Marion, Taylor and Washington. 
Dr. P. Hogue, Pine Knott, Physician, Republican. 

Sixteenth District— Clinton, Cimaberland, Adair, Rus- 
sell, Waj-ne and Monroe. Robert Antle, Jamestown, 
Teacher, Republican. 

Seventeenth District— Bell, Jackson, Knox, Whitley, 
Laurel, Pulaski, Rockcastle and McCreary. W. L. Moss, 
Pineville, Lawyer, Republican. 

Eighteenth District— Boyle, Lincoln, Garrard and 
Casey. J. W. Harlan, Danville, Lawj'er, Democrat. 

Nineteenth District— Barren, Metcalfe and Adair. 
J. H. Branstetter, Glasgow, Salesman, Republican. 

Twentieth District — Aaderson, Franklin and Mercer. 
L. M. Smith, Harrodsbm-g, Lawyer, Democrat. 

Twenty-first District— Carroll, Henry, Oldham and 
Trimble. Newton Bright, Eminence, Farmer, Democrat. 

Twenty-second District— Jessamine, Scott and Wood- 
ford. C. M. Hirriss, Versailles, Lawv^er, Democrat. 

Twenty-third District— Boone, Gallatin and Owen. 
T. B. Watts, Louisville, Railorad Conductor, Republican. 
Twenty-fourth District— Kenton. R. C. Simmons, 
Covington, Lawj-er, Democrat. 

Twenty-fifth District— Campbell. Jacob Metzger, 
Newport, Cigar Manufacturer, Republican. 

26 



Twenty-sixth District— Bracken, Grant and Pendleton. 
C. W. Burton, Crittenden, Farmer, Democrat. 

Twenty-seventh District— Fayette. J. W. Stoll, Lex- 
ington, Banker, Republican. 

Twenty-eighth District — Bourbon, Clarke and Mont- 
gomery. G. Hon, Winchester, Lumber Dealer, Democrat. 

Twenty-ninth District — Estill, Lee, Madison and 
Powell. Clarence Miller. Irvine, Law>er, Republican. 

Thirtieth District — Harrison, Nicholas and Robertson. 
M. C. Swinford, Cynthiana, Lawyer, Democrat. 

Thirty-first District— Lewis and Mason. A. H. Points, 
Salt Lick, Law>er, Democrat. 

Thirty-second District— Boyd, Elliott, Greenup and 
Lawrence. Dr. H. T. Morris, Greenup, Physician, Repub- 
lican. 

Thirty-third District— Clay, Floyd, Harlan, Johnson, 
Knott, Letcher, Leslie, Martin, Perry and Pike. H. M. 
Brock, Harlan, Lawyer, Republican. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
DISTRICTS AND MEMBERS. 

Adair and Taylor— T. R. Stults, Columbia, Republican . 

Allen — R. 0. Huntsman, Scottsville, Republican. 

Anderson — B. L. Cox, Lawrenceburg, Democrat. 

Ballard and Carlisle-^. W. Geveden, Arlington, 
Democrat. 

Barren— J. W. Vance, Cave City, Democrat. 

Bath and Rowan— Sidney Alfrey, Farmer, Republican. 

Bell— J. F. Bosworth. Middlesboro, Republican. 

Boone and Grant— Ekner Lusby, Keefer, Democrat. 

Bourbon — ^J. H. Thompson, Paris, Democrat. 

Boyd — Dan Vose, Catlettsburg, Republican. 

Boyle — C. D. Minor, Perryville, Democrat. 

Bracken and Pendleton— Dr. S. D. Laughlin, Augusta, 
Democrat. 

Breathitt and Lee— T. C. Pryse, Beattyville, Republi- 
can. 

Breckinridge and Hancock— R. J. Cain, Irvington, 
Republican. 

Bullitt and Spencer— Dr. B. F. Shields, Taylorsville, 
Democrat. 

Butler and Edmonson— E. W. Neel, Morgantown, 
Republican. 

Caldwell— W. T. Carner, Princeton, Republican. ' 

Calloway— T. P. Oliver, New Concord, Democrat. 

Campbell, Sixty-sixth District— C. B. Truesdell, Fort 
Thomas, Republican. 

Campbell, Sixty-seventh District — C. M. Ciarlo, New- 
port, Republican. 

Carroll and Gallatin — W. N. Winn, Warsaw, Democrat. 

Carter — J. B. Demuse, Olive Hill, Republican. 

Casey and Russell — Lee Rogers, Gravel Switch, Re- 
publican. 

Christian— V. M.Williamson, Hopkinsville, Republican. 

Clark— .1. W. Swope, Winchester, Democrat. 

27 



Clay and Owsley— R.C. Marcum.Big Creek, Republican. 

Clinton and Cumberland— S. G. Smith, Albany,. 
Republican. 

Crittenden and Livingston— R. E. Wilborn, Marion, 
Republican. 

Daviess, City District— J. S. Cruse, Owensboro, Re- 
publican. 

Daviess, County District— Griffin, Kelly, Maceo, 
Democrat. 

Elliott and Lawrence — ^E. E. Shannon, Louisa, Demo- 
crat. 

Estill and Jackson— H. N. Dean, Clover Bottom, 
Republican. 

Fayette, City District— H. H. Barnes, Lexington, 
Republican. 

Fayette, County District— A. L. Hamilton, Lexington, 
Democrat. 

Fleming^Charles Scott, Sheridan, Democrat. 

Floyd — William Stewart, Langley, Republican. 

Franklin— W. P. Scott, Frankfort, Democrat. 

Fulton and Hickman — Lon Adams, Fulton, Democrat. 

Garrard — Mack Morgan, Lancaster, Republican. 

Graves — Robert Humphreys, Mayfield, Democrat. 

Grayson^S. C. Ray, leitchfield, Republican. 

Green and Hart — J. M. Foster, Greensburg, Republican. 

Greenup— A. S. Cooper, Greenup, Republican. 

Hardin— C. A. Nelson, White Mills, Democrat. 

Harlan and Leslie — A. W. Huff, Confluence, Republican. 

Harrison— H. C. Duffy, Cynthiana, Democrat. 

Henderson— J. W. Johnson, Henderson, Democrat. 

Henry and Owen— The Rev. J. A. Lee, Owenton, 
Democrat. 

Hopkins — J. S. Webb, Earlington, Republican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-first District, County and Territory 
Annexed to Louisville— H. C. McLellen, Louisville, Re- 
publican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-second District, First Ward of Louisville 
— A. R. Hudson, Louisville, RepubUcan. 

Jefferson, Fifty-third District, Second and Third Wards 
of Louisville, Exclusive of Annexed Territory— B. J. 
Geohringer, Louisville, Republican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-fourth District, Fourth and Fifth Wards 
of Louisville— B. A. Roth, Louisville, Republican. 

. Jefferson, Fifty-fifth District, Sixth and Seventh 
Wards of Louisville— Joseph Lazarus, Louisville, Repub- 
lican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-sixth District, Eighth and Ninth Wards 
of Louisville — J. L. Richardson, Louis\alle, Republican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-seventh District, Eleventh and Twelfth 
Wards of Louisville, Exclusive of Annexed Territory- 
Henry Kaufman, Louis\'ille, Republican. 

Jefferson, Fifty-eighth District, Tenth Ward of Louis- 
ville— Dr. Lewis Ryans, Louisv-ille, Republican. 

Jessamine — Dr. T. R. Welch, Nicholasville, Democrat. 
Johnson and Martin— F. C. Vanhoose, Mingo, Repub- 
lican. 

28 



Kenton, Sixty-third District— J. T. Murphy, Covington, 
Democrat. 

Kenton, Sixty-fourth District— R. G. Bryson, Coving- 
ton, Republican. 

Kenton, Sixty-fifth District— H. J. Meyers, Covington, 
Democrat. 

Knott and Magoffin— R. L. Stewart, Hindman, Re- 
publican. 

Knox— S. M. Bennett, Lay, Republican. 

Larue and Nelson— J. B. Thomas, Bloomfield, Dem. 

Laurel and Rockcastle— R. L. McFerron, Mt. Ver- 
non. Republican. 

Letcher and Perry— Talbert Holliday, Hazard, 
Republican. 

Lewis— J. L. Trumbo, Ribolt, Republican. 

Lincoln— H. G. Skiles, Crab Orchard, Democrat. 

Logan — P. A. Day, Ferguson, Democrat. 

Lyon and Marshall— Dr. D. J. Travis, Eddyville, 
Democrat. 

Madison — Leonard Ballard, Richmond, Republican. 

Marion — J. M. Knott, Lebanon, Democrat. 

Mason — ^Dr. W. S. Yazell, Maysville, Republican. 

McCracken— J. T. Stites, Paducah, Democrat. 

McCreary and Wayne— Dr. T. H. Gramblin, Mon- 
ticello, Republican. 

McLean— Dr. W. L. Haynes, Calhoun, Democrat. 

Meade— W. M. Boling, Brandenburg, Democrat. 

Menifee and Montgomery— T. L. Caudel, French- 
burg, Democrat. 

Mercer and Washington— A. M. Wash, Harrodsburg, 
Republican . 

Metcalf and Monroe— Hebron Lawrence, Tomkins- 
ville, Republican. 

Morgan— Frank Kennard, Logville, Democrat. 

Muhlenberg— A. J. McCandless, Cleaton, Republican. 

Nicholas and Robertson— B. F. Reynolds, Carlisle, 
Democrat. 

Ohio — L S. Mason, Hartford, Republican. 

Oldham and Trimble— H. A. Spillman, Bedford, 
Democrat. 

Pike — J. M. Biliter, Majestic, Republican. 

Powell and Wolfe— The Rev. Sherman Robbins, 
Stanton, Republican. 

Pulaski— Gladstone Wesley, Somerset, Republican. 

Scott— The Rev. G. C. Waggoner, Stamping Ground, 
Democrat. 

Shelby— W. T. Beckham, Shelbyville, Democrat. 

Simpson^Dr. W. L. Gossett, Franklin, Democrat. 

Todd — W. L. Kimbrough, Guthrie, Republican. 

Trigg— A. F. Hanbery, Cadiz, Republican. 

Union — J. M. Thompson, Sturgis, Democrat. 

Warren City District— F. L. Strange, Bowling Green, 
Democrat. 

Warren County District— W. G. Wheeler, Bowling 
Green, Democrat. 

Webster— E. C. Hardin, Wheatcroft, Democrat. 

Whitley— J. F. Carr, Deering, Republican. 

Woodford— D. J. Howard, Versailles, Democrat. 

29 



POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF THE 
LEGISLATURE— 1920 

Rep. Dem. 

18 20 

House 55 45 

Totals 73 65 

Republican majority joint ballot 8. 

KENTUCKY U. S. SENATORS 

J. C. W. Beckham, Frankfort, Democrat. Term 
expires March 3, 1921 . 

A. 0. Staiile\-, Henderson, Democrat. Term expires 
March 3, 1925. 

KENTUCKY DISTRICTS— CONGRESSIONAL 
MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 

First District— Ballard, Caldwell, Calloway, Car- 
lisle, Crittenden, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Livingston, 
Lyon, Marshall, McCracken and Trigg. 

Alben W. Barkley, Democrat, Paducah. 

Second District— Christian, Daviess, Hancock, Hen- 
derson, Hopkins, McLean, Union and Webster. 

Da\id H. Kincheloe, Democrat, Madison%'ille. 

Third District— Allen, Barren, Butler, Edmonson, 
Logan, Metcalf, Muhlenberg, Simpson, Todd and Warren. 

Robert Y. Thomas, Democrat, Central City. 

Fourth District— Breckinridge, Bullitt, Grayson, 
Green, Hardin, Hart, Larue, Marion, Meade, Nelson, 
Ohio, Taylor and Washington. Ben Johnson, Democrat, 
Bardstown. 

Fifth District— Jefferson County. Charles F. Ogden, 
Republican. Louisville. 

Sixth District— Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, 
Grant, Kenton, Pendleton and Trimble. 

A. B. Rouse, Democrat, Burlington. 

Seventh District— Bourbon, Fayette, Franklin, Henry, 
Oldham, Owen, Scott and Woodford. 

J. Campbell Cantrill, Democrat, Georgetown. 

Eighth District— Anderson, Boyle, Garrard, Jessa- 
mine, Lincoln, Madison, Mercer, Rockcastle, Shelby and 
Spencer. 

Ralph Gilbert, Democrat, Shelbyville. 

Ninth District— Bath, Bracken, Boyd, Carter, Flem- 
ing, Greenup, Harrison, Lawrence, Lewis, Mason, Nicho- 
las. Robertson and Rowan. W. J. Field, Democrat, Olive 
Hill. 

Tenth District— Breathitt. Clark, Elliott, Estill 
Floyd, Johnson, Knott, Lee, Martin, Magoffin, Menifee, 
Montgomery, Morgan, Pike, Powelland Wolfe. 

John W. Langley, Republican, Pike\'ille. 

Eleventh District— Adair, Bell, Casey, Clay, Clin- 
ton, Cumberland, Harlan, Knox, Letcher, Leslie, Laurel, 
Monroe, Owsley, Perry, Ptilaski, Russell, Wayne, Whitle\- 
and Jackson. 

J. M. Robsion, Republican, Barbourville, Ky. 

30 



CHIEF JUSTICES OF KENTUCKY. 

Harry Innis 1792 

George Muter 1792 

Thomas Todd 1806 

Felix Grundy 1807 

Ninian Edwards 180H 

George M. Bibb 1809 

John Boyle 1810 

George M. Bibb 1827 

George Robertson 1829 

E. M. Ewing 1843 

Thomas A. Marshall 1847 

James Simpson 1852 

Elijah Hise 1854 

Thomas A. Marshall 1856 

B. Miles Crenshaw 1857 

Zachariah Wheat 1858 

James Simpson 1860 

Benry J. Stiles 1862 

Alvin Duvall 1864 

Joshua F. Bullitt 1865 

William Simpson 1866 

Thomas A. Marshall 1866 

Belvard J. Peters 1868 

Rufus K. Williams 1870 

George Robertson 1871 

William S. Pryor 1872 

Mordecai R. Hardin 1874 

Belvard J. Peters 1876 

William Lindsay 1878 

William S. Pryor 1880 

M. H. Cofer 1881 

Joseph H. Lewis 1882 

Thos. F. Hargis 1884 

Thos. H. Hines 1885 

William S. Pryor 1886 

Joseph H. Lewis 1887 

William H. Holt 1888 

Caswell Bennett 1893 

William S. Pryor 1894 

L M. Quigley 1894 

W^illiam S. Pryor 1895 

J. H. Lewis 1897 

J. H. Hazeb-igg 1899 

T. H. Paynter 1901 

B. L. D. Guffy 1902 

A. R. Burnam 1903-1904 

J. P. Hobson 1904-1906 

Ed. C. O'Rear 1907-1908 

W. E. Settle 1908 

T. J. Nunn 1909 

H. S. Barker 1910 

J. P. Hobson 1911-1914 

Shackelford Miller 1915-1916 

W. E. Settle 1917-1918 

John D. Carroll 1919-1920 

31 



KENTUCKY GOVERNORS 

Isaac Shelby, June 4, 1792-1796, 1812-1816, B 1750, D 

1826. 
James Garrard, June 1, 1796-1804, B 1749-D 1822. 
Christopher Greenup, June 1, 1804-1808, B 1750, D 1818. 

Chas. Scott, June 1, 1808-1812, B , D 1820. 

Geo. Madison, June 1, 1816, B 1763, D 1816. 
Gabriel Slaughter, June 1, 1819-1820, B 1767, D 1830. 
John Adair, June 1, 1820-1824, B 1757, D 1840. 
Joseph Desha, June 1, 1824-1828, B 1786, D 1842. 
Thos. Metcalfe, June 1, 1828-1832, B 1780, D 1855. 
John Breathitt, June 1, 1832-1834, B 1786, D 1834. 
Jas. T. Morehead, June 1, 1834-1836, B 1797, D 1854. 
Jas. Clark, June 1, 1836-1839, B 1779, D 1839. 
Chas. A. Wickliffe, June 1, 1839-1840, B 1788, D 1869. 
Robt. P. Letcher, June 1, 1844, B — , D 1861. 
Wm. Owsley, June 1, 1844-1848, B 1782, D 1862. 
Jno. J. Crittenden, June 1, 1848-1850, B 1786, D 1863. 
Jno. L. Helm, June 1, 1850-1851, B 1802, D 1867. 
L. W. Powell, Sept. 1, 1851-1855, B 1812, D 1867. 
Chas. S. Morehead, Sept. 1, 1855-1859, B 1802, D 1868. 
Beriah Magoffin, Sept. 1, 1859-1862. B 1815, D 1885. 

Jas. F. Robinson, Sept. 1, 1862-1863, B , D 1882. 

Thos. E. Bramlett, Sept. 1, 1S63-1867, B 1817, D 1875. 
Jno. L. Helm, Sept. 1, 1867-5 days, B 1802, D 1867. 
J. W. Stevenson, Sept. 1, 1867-1871, B 1812, D 1886. 
Preston H. Leslie, Sept. 1, 1871-1875, B 1819. 
Jas. B. McCreary, Sept. 1, 1875-1879, 1911-1915, B 1838, 

D 1917. 
L. P. Blackburn, Sept. 1, 1879-1883, B 1816, D 1887. 
J. Proctor Knott, Sept. 1, 1883-1887, B 1830, D 1911. 
Simon B. Buckner, Sept. 1, 1887-1891, B 1823, D 1914. 
John Young Brown, Sept. 1, 1891-1895, B 1835, D 1904. 
W. 0. Bradley, Dec. 1, 1895-1899, B 1847, D 1914, 

Wm. S. Tavlor, Dec. 1, 1899-1900, B , living. 

Wm. Goebel, Jan. 31, 1900 , B 1856, D 1900. 

J. C. W. Beckham, Feb. 3, 1900-1909, B 1869, living. 
Augustus E. Wilson. Dec. 10, 1907-1911, B 1846, living. 
Jas. B. McCreary, Dec. 12, 1911-1915, B 1838, D 1917. 
A. 0. Stanley, Dec. 7, 1915-1919, B 1867, living. 
James D. Black, 1919, B 1855, living. 
Edwin P. Morrow, 1919, B 1873, living. 



32 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 

(From Kentucky) 

John Brown 1792 to 1805 

John Edwards 1792 to 1795 

Humphrey Marshall 1795 to 1801 

John Breckinridge 1801 to 1805 

John Adair 1805 to 1806 

John Buckner Thurston 1805 to 1809 

Henry Clay 1806 to 1807 

Henry Clay 1809 to 1811 

Henry Clay 1831 to 1842 

Henry Clay 1849 to 1850 

John Pope 1807 to 1813 

George M. Bibb 1811 to 1814 

George M. Bibb 1829 to 1835 

Jesse Bledsoe 1813 to 1815 

George Walker 1814 to 1815 

William T. Barry 1815 to 1816 

Isham Talbot 1815 to 1819 

Isham Talbot 1820 to 1825 

Martin D. Hardin 1816 to 1817 

John J. Crittenden 1817 to 1819 

John J. Crittenden 1835 to 1841 

John J. Crittenden 1842 to 1848 

John J. Crittenden 1855 to 1861 

Wm. Logan 1819 to 1820 

Richard M. Johnson 1820 to 1829 

John Rowan 1825 to 1831 

James T. Morehead 1841 to 1847 

Joseph R. Underwood 1847 to 1853 

Thomas Metcalfe 1848 to 1849 

David Meriwether 1852 to 1853 

Archibald Dixon 1852 to 1855 

John B. Thompson 1853 to 1859 

Uzarus W. Powell 1859 to 1865 

John C. Breckinridge 1861 .... 

Garrett Davis 1861 to 1872 

James Guthrie 1865 to 1868 

T. C. McCreary 1868 to 1871 

T. C. McCreary 1873 to 1879 

John W. Stevenson 1871 to 1877 

Willis B. Machen 1873 to 1875 

James B. Beck 1877 to 1890 

John S. Williams 1879 to 1885 

Joseph C. S. Blackburn 1886 to 1897 

*John Griffin Carlisle 1890 to 1893 

Wm. J. Lindsay 1893 to 1895 

Wm. J. Lindsay 1895 to 1901 

W. J. Deboe. 1897 to 1903 

J. C. S. Blackburn 1901 to 1907 

Jas. B. McCreary 1903 to 1909 

Thos. H. Paynter 1907 to 1913 

Wm. 0. Bradley 1909 to 1915 

*Resigned to accept appointment as Secretary of the 
Treasury of the United States, March. 1893. 

33 



Ollie M. James 1913 to 1919 

Johnson N. Camden 1914 to 1915 

( Served unexpired term of W. 0. Bradley, who died in office.) 

J. C. W. Beckham 1915 to 1921 

A. Owsley Stanley 1919 to 1925 

Richard P. Ernst 1921 to 1927 

PRESIDING OFFICERS KENTUCKY 
SENATE 1792 TO 1920 

Bullitt, Alexander 1792 to 1802 

Caldwell, John 1804 

Posey, Thomas 1805 to 1806 

Clay, Green 1807 

Slaughter, Gabriel 1808 to 1811 

Hickman, Richard 1813 to 1816 

Bullock, Edmond (acting) 1816 

Ewing, Robert (acting) 1817 

Blackburn, Wm. B. (acting) 1818 to 1819 

Barry, WilUam T 1820 to 1823 

Breathitt, John 1824 to 1831 

Morehead, James 1832 to 1833 

Clarke, James 1834 

Blackburn, William B 1835 

Wickliffe, Charles 1836 to 1838 

Hanson, Samuel (acting) 1839 to 1840 

Thompson, Manlius 1840 to 1843 

Dixon, Archibald 1844 to 1847 

Helm, John L 1848 to 1849 

Gray, Ben Edwards (acting) 1850 

Thompson, John B 1851 to 1852 

Bibb, Henry G. (acting) 1853 to 1854 

Hardy, James G 1855 to 1856 

King, John Q. A. (acting) 1857 to 1858 

Boyd, Lynn 1859 

Porter, Thomas (acting) 1859 to 1860 

Robinson, James F 1861 

Fisk, John F 1862 

Jacob, Richard T 1863 to 1864 

Bruner, John B. (pro tem) 1865 to 1866 

Johnson, William (acting) 1867 to 1868 

Leslie, Preston H 1869 to 1870 

Holt, G. A. (acting) 1871 to 1874 

Carlisle, John G 1875 to 1878 

Cantrill, James E 1878 to 1882 

Hindman, J 1883 to 1886 

Bryan, J. W 1887 to 1890 

Alford, M. C 1891 to 1894 

Worthington, J. C 1895 to 1898 

Marshall, John 1899 to 1900 

Carter, LiUard H 1900 to 1901 

Utley, N. W 1902 to 1903 

Thorne, W. P 1904 to 1907 

Cox. W. H 1908 to 1911 

McDermott, Edward J 1912 to 1915 

34 



Black, James D 1916 to 1919 

Harri&s, Charlea M. (acting) 1919 

Bullard, S. Thruston 1920 to 

SPEAKERS KENTUCKY HOUSE OF REPRE- 
SENTATIVES 1792 TO 1920 

Robt. Breckinridge 1792 to 1795 

Edmund Bullock 1796 to 1798 

John Breckinridge 1799 to 1801 

John Adair 1802 to 1803 

Wm. Logan 1804 to 1806 

Henry Clay 1807 

Wm. Logan 1808 to 1809 

John Simpson 1810 to 1811 

Jos H. Hawkins 1812 to 1813 

Wm. T. Barrv 1814 

John J. Crittenden 1815 to 1816 

Jos. C. Breckinridge 1817 to 1818 

Martin D. Hardin 1819 

Geo. C. Simpson 1820 to 1821 

Rich. C. Anderson 1822 

George Robertson 1823, 1825 and 1826 

Robt. J. Wood 1825 

John Speed Smith 1827 

Tunstall Quarles 1828 

John J. Crittenden 1829 to 1832 

Rich. B. Pew 1833 

Chas. A. Wickliffe 1834 

J. L. Helm 1835, 1836, 1839, 1842-3 

Robt. P. Letcher 1837 to 1838 

C. S. Morehead 1840, 1841 and 1844 

Jos. R. Underwood 1845 

Leslie Combs 1846 

James F. Buckner 1847 

Gwyn Page 1848 

Thos. W. Riley 1849 

George W. Johnson 1850 

George Robertson 1851 

Chas. G Wintersmith 1853 

John B. Huston 1855 

Daniel P. White 1857 

David Meriwether 1859 

Rich. A. Buckner, Jr 1861 

Harrison Taylor 1863 to 1867 

John T. Munch 1867 to 1871 

Jas. B. McCreary 1871 to 1875 

Wm. J. Stone 1875 to 1877 

Ed. W. Turner 1877 to 1879 

Jos. M. Bigger 1879 to 1881 

Wm. C. Owens 1881 to 1883 

Charles Offutt 1883 to 1884 

Charles Offutt 1885 to 1887 

Ben Johason 1887 to 1889 

Harvey Meyers 1889 to 1891 

35 



Wm. M. Moore 1891 to 1893 

A. J. Carroll 1893 to 1895 

Charles Blanford 1896 to 1898 

J. C. W. Beckham 1898 to 1900 

South Trimble 1900 to 1902 

Gerald T. Finn 1902 to 1904 

Eli H. Brown, Jr 1904 to 1906 

Henry R. Lawrence • 1906 to 1908 

W. J. Gooch 1908 to 1909 

Geo. Wilson 1910 

Claude B. Terrell 1912 

Claude B. Terrell 1912 to 1914 

H. C. Duffy 1916 to 1918 

Joseph F. Bosworth 1920 

KENTUCKY LEADS. 

Kentucky leads all States in the Union in the production 
of tobacco, hemp, sorghum cane, and in thorobred horses. 

Its tobacco crop in 1915 was 360,000,000 pounds, more 
than one- third of the total crop of America. 

There were 22 States in the Union last year that pro- 
duced farm products valued at over §100,000,000. Ken- 
tucky was one of these. 

Kentucky is the tenth State in the production of corn, 
its yield last year being over 115,000,000 bushels. 

Kentucky stands seventh in the Union in the production 
of apples, its crop in 1915 being 12,500,000 bushels. There 
are nearly 15,000,000 bearing fruit trees in the State of 
Kentucky. 

There are more registered Jersey cattle in Shelby County, 
Ky., than in any county in any State in America. 

The show rings of the world have demonstrated the 
value of Kentucky-bred stock, not only horses and mules, 
but dairy and beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

Among States located south of the Ohio River, Kentucky 
leads in nearly every agricultural product. 

It has the largest white population of any State south 
of the Ohio River. 

Seventy-five per cent of its population is rural. 

It has more persons worth $5,000 and over, and more 
with incomes of $2,500 per year and over. 

The value of farm property in Kentucky is over 
$800,000,000, being larger than that of any other State 
south of the Ohio River. 

There are 260,000 farms in the State, with a higher 
value per acre. 

Among the States south of the Ohio River, Kentucky 
leads in the production of dairy and beef cattle, horses, 
poultry, sheep, wool, corn, wheat and tobacco, and comes 
second in hay and potatoes. 

There are more silos in Kentucky than in all the other 
States of the Central South put together. 

In 1914, there were registered in Kentucky only 8,750 
automobiles. Sept. 1, 1917, the registration was over 43,000. 

Kentucky also leads these States in the production of 
poultry and eggs. 

36 



It leads in the purchase and use of modern farm imple- 
ments and machinery. 

In Kentucky there are more farmers who own their own 
farms, consetiuently, there are fewer renters and tenants, 
and there are also fewer negro farmers than in anv State 
of the South. 



COUNTIES OF KENTUCKY. 

When Made and From What Counties. 

Adair, 1801, Green. 

Allen, 1815, Warren and Barren. 

Anderson, 1827, Franklin, Mercer and Washington. 

Ballard. 1842, Hickman and McCracken. 

Barren, 1798, Warren and Green. 

Bath, 1811, Montgomery. 

Bell, 1867, Harlan and Knox. 

Boone, 1798, Campbell. 

Bourbon, 1785, Fayette. 

Boyd, 1860, Greenup, Carter and Lawrence. 

Boyle, 1841, Mercer and Lincoln. 

Bracken, 1796, Mason and Campbell. 

Breathitt. 1839, Clay, Perry and Estill. 

Breckinridge, 1799, Hardin. 

Bullitt, 1796, Jefferson and Nelson. 

Butler, 1810, Logan and Ohio. 

Caldwell, 1809, Livingston. 

Calloway, 1821, Hickman. 

Campbell, 1794, Harrison, Scott and Mason. 

Carlisle, 1845, Ballard. 

Carroll, 1838. Gallatin. 

Carter, 1836, Greenup and Lawrence. 

Casey. 1806, Lincoln. 

Christian, 1796, Logan. 

Clark, 1793, Fayette and Bourbon. 

Clay, 1806, Lincoln. 

Clinton, 1835, Wayne and Cumberland. 

Crittenden, 1842, Livingston. 

Cumberland, 1798, Green. 

Daviess, 1815, Ohio 

Edmonson, 1825, Warren, Hart and Grayson. 

Elliott, 1869, Morgan, Carter and Lawrence. 

Estill, 1808, Madison and Clark. 

Fayette, 1780, Kentucky. 

Fleming, 1798. Mason. 

Floyd, 1799, Fleming, Montgomery and Mason. 

Franklin, 1794, Woodford, Mason and Scott. 

Fulton, 1845, Hickman. 

Gallatin, 1798, Franklin and Shelby. 

Garrard, 1796, Mercer, Lincoln and Madison. 

Grant, 1820, Pendleton. 

Graves, 1823, Hickman. 

Grayson, 1810, Hardin and Ohio. 



37 



Green, 1792, Lincoln and Nelson. 

Greenup, 1803, Mason. 

Hancock, 1829, Breckinridge, Daviesa and Ohio. 

Hardin, 1792, Nelson. 

Harlan, 1819, Floyd and Knox. 

Harrison. 1793, Bourbon and Scott. 

Hart, 1819, Hardin and Green. 

Henderson, 1798, Christian. 

Henry, 1798, Shelby. 

Hickman, 1821, Caldwel! and Livingston. 

Hopkins, 1806, Henderson. 

Jackson, 1858, Estill, Owsley, Clay, Laurel, Rockcastle 
and Madison. 

Jefferson, 1780, Kentucky. 

Jessamine, 1798, Fayette. 

Johnson, 1842, Floyd, Lawrence and Morgan. 

Kenton, 1840, Campbell. 

Knox, 1799, Lincoln. 

Knott, 1884, Floyd, Letcher, Perry and Breathitt. 

Larue, 1843, Hardin. 

Laurel, 1825, Rockcastle, Clay. Knox and Whitley. 

Lawrence, 1821, Greenuc and Fioyd. 

Lee, 1870, Owsley, Estill, Wolfe and Breathitt. 

Leslie, 1878, Perry, Clay and Harlan. 

Letcher, 1842, Perry and Harlan. 

Lewis, 1806, Mason. 

Lincoln, 1780, Kentucky. 

Livingston, 1798, Christian. 

Logan, 1792, Lincoln. 

Lyon, 1854, Caldwell. 

Madison, 1785, Lincoln. 

Magoffin, 1860, Morgan and Floyd. 

Marion, 1834, Washington. 

Marshall, 1831, Calloway. 

Martin, 1870, Pike, Johnson and Floyd. 

Mason, 1788, Bourbon. 

McCracken, 1824, Hickman. 

McCreary, 1912, Whitley and Pulaski. 

McLean, 1854, Daviess, Muhlenberg and Ohio. 

Meade, 1823, Hardin and Breckinridge. 

Menifee, 1869, Bath, Morgan, Powell, Wolfe and Mont- 
gomery. 

Mercer, 1785, Lincoln. 

Metcalfe. 1860, Barren. Green, Adair, Cumberland and 
Monroe. 

Monroe, 1820, Barren and Cumberland. 

Montgomery. 1796, Clark. 

Morgan. 1822, Fioyd and Bath. 

Muhlenberg, 1798, Logan and Christian. 

Nelson, 1784, Jefferson. 

Nicholas, 1799, Bourbon and Mason. 

Ohio, 1798, Hardin. 

Oldham, 1823, Jefferson, Shelby and Henry. 

Owen, 181y, Franklin, Scott and Gallatin. 

Owsley. 1842, Breathitt, day and Estill. 

Pendleton, 1798, Bracken and Campbell. 

38 



Perry, 1829, Clay and Floyd. 

Pike, 1821. Floyd. 

Powell, 1852, Montgomery, Clark and Estill. 

Pulaski, 1798, Lincoln and Green. 

Robertson, 1867, Harrison, Mason, Nicholas and Bracken. 

Rockcastle, 1810, Lincoln, Madison. Pulaski and Knox. 

Rowan, 1856, Morgan and Fleming. 

Russell, 1825, Cumberland, Adair and Wayne. 

Scott, 1792, Woodford. 

Shelby, 1792, Jefferson. 

Simpson. 1819, Christian and Logan. 

Spencer, 1824. Shelby, Nelson and Bullitt. 

Taylor, 1848, Green. 

Todd, 1819, Christian and Logan 

Trigs, 1820. Caldwell and Christian 

Trimble. 1836, Oldham, Henry and Gallatin. 

Union, 1811, Henderson. 

Warren, 1796, Logan. 

Washington, 1798, Nelson. 

Wavne. 1800, Cumberland and Pulaski. 

Webster, 1850, Henderson. Hopkins and Union 

Whitley, 1818. Knox. 

Wolfe, 1860, Fayette, Breathitt, Morgan. Owsley and 
Powell. 

Woodford, 1788. Fayette 

AREA 40,400 SQUARE MILES 

Population of Kentucky by periods since 1775. showing 
increase: 
Year Population Increase 

1775 300 

1784 30,000 29,700 

1790' .' 73.677 43,677 

1800 222,955 149,278 

1810 406,571 183,616 

1820 564,135 157,564 

1830 687,917 123.718 

1840' .' 779,828 92,177 

1850 982,403 202,572 

I860 .: 1.155.684 173,221 

1870 1,321,011 165.399 

1880 1 ,648 , 690 327 .697 

1890 1,858,635 209,947 

1900 2.147,174 288,535 

1910 2.289,905 142.731 

1920 (Census report not yet made.) 

FIRST HISTORICAL THINGS. 

Envelopes were first used in 1839. 

Telescopes were invented in 1590. 

The first steel pen was made in 1830. 
Watches were first constructed in 1476. 
The first iron steamship was built in 1830. 
The first lucifer match was made in 1829. 
Coaches were first used in England in 1569. 
Modern needles first came into use in 1545. 
Kerosene was first used for lighting purposes in 1826. 

39 



The first U. S. newspaper was published in 1790. 
The first newspaper advertisement appeared in 1652. 
Cotton spinning was done by hand-wheels until 1776. 
The first knives were used in England in 1559. 
Wheeled carriages were first used in France in 1559. 
The first steam engine in this country was brought from 
England in 1753. 

KENTUCKY. 

Important Historical information. 

The First White Men to enter Kentucky and make an 
exploration were Daniel Boone, John Findley and others, 
in 1769. They remained two years on this ^^sit. 

The First Settlement was made at Harrodsburg, in 1769. 

The First Permanent Camp was constructed by Daniel 
Boone on the Red River in June, 1769. 

The First Fortified Camp was completed in June, 1775, 
it was located at Boonesborough near the mouth of Otter 
Creek, on the Kentucky River. The camp was built by 
Daniel Boone. 

Boonesborough was incorporated as a town by the 
Virginia Legislature in October, 1779. 

Kentucky was the fifteenth State admitted to the Union. 
It was admitted June 1, 1792. 

Kentucky was a part of Virginia, it was oripnally called 
the County of Kentucky. It separated from Virginia in 
1790. 

The Area of Kentucky is 40,400 square miles. 

The State contains a greater navigable river frontage 
than any other State. The frontage is about 4,000 miles. 

The Town Site of Louisville was laid off in August, 177.3, 
and was incorporated as a town by the Legislature of 
Virginia in 1780. 

The First Newspaper Published in the State was the 
"Kentucky Gazette." It was located in Lexington, and 
its first issue was dated August 28, 1787. 

The First Railroad Train run in the State was on January 
25, 1835. 

The First Kentucky Convention, for formation of State, 
was held at Danville in 1784. 

The First Constitutional Convention was held April 
3, 1792. 

The First Session of the Kentucky Legislature was held 
June 4 to 29, inclusive, 1792. It met at Lexington. 

The First Governor chosen was Isaac Shelby. 

The First Law made by the Kentucky Legislature was 
an Act to establish an Auditor's Office of Public Accounts. 

The First Marriage Ceremony on record performed 
in the State was on August 7, 1775. Samuel Henderson 

40 



and Elizabeth Callaway were the couple who were umted 
in marriage. 

The First Home for the Widows and Orphans of de- 
ceased Masons was established in Kentucky. 

Abraham Lincoln, who became President of the United 
States, was born in Kentucky, February 12, 1809. He 
was a resident of the State of Illinois when he was elected 
President. 

Jefferson Davis, the first and only President of the 
Southern Confererate States, during the Civil War, 1861-65, 
was born in Kentucky on June 3, 1808. 

Zachary Taylor was a resident of Kentucky when he 
was elected President of the United States. He Cded 
in the State and is buried in Jefferson County, seven miles 
from Louisville. 

Zachary Taylor was born in Virginia in 1784, and 
moved to Kentucky in 1785. 

General George Rogers Clark, founder of Louisville, 
and conquerer of the Northwest Territory, was born in 
Albemarle Co., Virginia, November 19, 1752; died in 
Jefferson County, Ky., February 18, 1818. His body 
is buried in Cave flill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky., his rest- 
ing place marked by a modest headstone. 

In 1770 George Washington entered and explored north- 
eastern Kentucky, and Col. Knox and his Long Hunters 
explored other parts. 

The State is divided into Eleven Congressional Districts; 
Thirty-eight State Senatorial Districts, and One Hundred 
Legislative Districts. 

The State is divided into One Hundred and Twenty 
Counties. 

The State has Thirteen Electoral Votes in choosing a 
President of the United States. 

Democratic Party in Kentucicy, was founded at Lexington, 
oil August 28, 1798. This was the first poUtical party 
organization west of the Allegheny Mountains. 

Kentucky (1st) Regiment of Infantry, National Guards 
^during "World's War," 159th U. S. Infantry) was organ- 
ized in 1847. It saw service in the Mexican, Civil and 
Spanish-American Wars. It was in the service of the 
United States in "The World's Greatest War." 

Population in 1900 2,147,174 

Population in 1910 2,350,731 

Population in 1920 2,416,013 



41 



STATE FLOWERS. 

Name of State. Name of Flower. By Whom Chosen. 

Alabama No Choice 

Arizona Sahuaro or Giant 

Cactus Legislature. 

Arkansas Apple Blossom. . .Legislature. 

California Golden Poppy Legislature. 

Colorado Blue Columbine. .School Children. 

Connecticut Mountain Laurel . Legislature. 

Delaware Peach Blossom. . .Legislature. 

Dist. of Columbia. . . No Choice. 

Florida Orange Blossom. .Legislature. 

Georgia Cherokee Rose . . . Legislature. 

Idaho Syringa Common Consent. 

Illinois Violet Legislatm-e. 

Indiana Carnation Legislature. 

Iowa Wild Rose Common Consent. 

Kansas Sunflower Legislature. 

Kentucky Trumpet Vine Common Consent. 

Louisiana Magnolia Legislature. 

Maine Pine Cone Tassel . School Children. 

Maryland No Choice. 

Massachusetts No Choice. : 

Michigan Apple Blossom. . .Legislature. 

Minnesota Moccasin Flower . Legislature. 

Mississippi Magnolia School Children. 

Missouri No Choice. 

Montana Bitter Root Legislature. 

Nebraska Goldenrod Legislature. 

Nevada Sagebrush Common Consent. 

New Hampshire. . . .No Choice. 

New Jersey No Choice. 

New Mexico Cactus School Children. 

New York Rose School Children. 

North Carolina Daisy Common Consent. 

North Dakota Wild Prairie Rose.Legislature. 

Ohio Scarlet Carnation.Legislature. 

Oklahoma Mistletoe Legislature. 

Oregon Oregon Grape. . . .Legislature. 

Pennsylvania No Choice. 

Rhode Island Violet School Children. 

South CaroUna No Choice. 

South Dakota Pasque Flower. . .Legislature. 

Tennessee No Choice. 

Texas Blue Bonnet Legislature. 

Utah Sego Lily Legislature. 

Vermont Red Clover Legislature. 

Virginia No Choice. 

Washington Rhododendron. . .Common Consent. 

West Virginia Rhododendron. . .Legislature. 

Wisconsin Violet School Children. 

Wyoming Indian Paintbrush.Legislature. 



42 



LOUISVILLE IN BRIEF. 

HISTORICAL, STATISTICAL, FIRST THINGS, ETC. 

The first Court House was built in Louisville in 1784. 
It was a log house 16x20 feet, one story high, with pun- 
cheon floor and board roof. It was erected by George 
Wilson, at a cost of £92, 18 shillings and 9 pence, equal 
to $309.79. This Court House was burned in 1787, and 
with it was consumed important parts of the early records 
of the City and County. 

The second Court House was built in 1789, It was a 
stone house forty feet square and two stories high, with 
a spire and belfry on top. This building was not only 
used as a Court House, but for a Town Hall and for religious 
purposes. 

This stone building was used until 1811 when a brick 
Court House (the third) was erected on the site of the 
present City Hall. This was the handsomest structure 
of its kind in the Western Country. It was built after a 
plan by John Gwathmey, Esq. 

The present Court Hoiise (the fourth) was begun in 
1835 and after the walls were up and roofed, it was covered 
in and the windows boarded up and left incomplete for 
more than twenty years for the lack of funds. It had 
been called "Guthrie's Folly;" it having been projected 
by Mr. Guthrie with the idea that in time it would become 
the Capitol of the State. Work was resumed on the Court 
House in 1858 and was finished and occupied in 1860. 

The History of Louisville as a city may be said to have 
begun on the 13th day of February, 1828, which was the 
date of its first City Charter. From the time of its first 
organization as a village, February 7, 1781, until its in- 
corporation as a city, it had been governed by Trustees. 
It was erected into a city of five wards and placed under 
the government of a Mayor and City Council, the latter 
being composed of ten members, two from each ward. At 
this time Louisville had a population of nearly 8,000. 

The first election for Mayor and other City Officials 
was held on the 4th day of May, 1828. Mr. J. C. Bucklin 
was elected the First Mayor by a small majority over Mr. 
W. Thompson. 

Since Louisville was chartered as a City the following 
men have served as Mayor: 

John C. Bucklin 1828-33 James S. Speed 1853-54 

John Joyes 1834-35 John Barbee 1855-56 

WilUam A. Cocke. . . . 1836- W. S. Pilcher, 1857, died Aug. 
Frederick A. Kaye . . . 1837-40 1858. 

D. L. Beatty 1841-43 Thomas W. Riley. . . . 1858- 

Frederick A. Kaye. . . 1844-46 T. H. Crawford 1859-60 

William R. Vance. . . . 1847-49 John M. Delph 1861-62 

John M. Delph 1850-52 WiUiam Kaye 1863-64 

43 



LOUISVILLE IN BRIEF— Continued. 

Philip Tomppert, 1865 to Dec. R. E. King, pro-tem, Jan 14, 

28. 1896, to Dec. 31, 1896. 

J. S. Lithgow 1865-67 George D. Todd, Dec. 31, 

Philip Tomppert. . . . 1867-68 1896, to Nov. 16, 1897. 
JosephH. Bunce. ...1869- Chas. P. Weaver, Nov. 16, 

John G. Baxter 1870-72 1897 to 1901. 

Charles D. Jacob. . . .1873-78 Charles F. Granger. . 1901-05 

John G. Baxter 1879-81 Paul C. Barth, 1905 until July, 

Charles D. Jacob. . . . 1882-84 1907. 

P. Booker Reed 1885-87 R. W. Bingham, July 19, 1907, 

Charles D. Jacob. . . . 1888-90 to Nov. 19, 1907. 
William L. Lyons elected pro- James F. Grinstead. . 1907-09 

tem May 12, 1890. W. 0. Head 1909-13 

Henry S. Tyler, 1891-96, died John H.Buschemeyer.1913-17 

Jan. 14, 1896. George Weissinger 

Smith 1917-1921 

Population 264,891, including new annexations. 

Annual Tax Rate is §1.98. 

The city covers 26.3 square miles. 

Unsurpassed shopping facilities. 

The best State Fair of any city in the South. 

Five years' exemption from taxation for all new factories. 

Ten days' stop-over privilege by all railroads on request. 

Its manufactured products go to every quarter of the 
globe. 

The largest Armory in the United States; seats 16,000 
people. 

Within 100 miles of the center of population of the 
United States 

A new sewerage system completed at a cost of approx- 
imately S6,000,000. 

A city with more than 1,000 manufacturing plants, mak- 
ing every want of mankind. 

Nine railroads and eleven interurban lines. Railroad 
rates on a competitive basis with water rates. 
Five cent city fare. 

A $3,000,000 filter plant provides the city with water of 
pronounced clearness and acknowledged parity. 

Louisville is one of the largest centers of manufacture 
of plows and tillage and harvesting implements. 

"Two race courses (one is not used). 

Over a score of theaters and amusement parks make 
Louisville a place where entertainment is plentiful 

A free public library and art gallery with seven branch 
libraries is one of the city's charming attractions. 

Transportation by rail and river is unexcelled for cheap- 
ness and extent of territory covered. 

Splendid switching facilities are afforded the entire 
factory district. 

A nine-foot stage for the Ohio River all the year round 
has been authorized by Congress. 

The best inland harbor in the United States. 

44 



LOUISVILLE IN BRIEF —Continued. 

Its retail stores are acknowledged to be the best and the 
styles the most approved of any city of its size in America. 
Every conceivable line of the retail trade is represente>l 
Louisville's beautiful and extensive residence section is 
composed of broad, level avenues, lined with shade trees. 
Its suburbs are delightfully attractive and easily accessible 
by city and intcrurban car 'ines. 

The city has 224.75 miles of paved streets with 165 miles 
of street railway trackage and 93 miles of suburban tracks 

Miles of paved streets 240 

Miles of sewerage 340.00 

Miles of boulevard 13. 

Number of parks 13. 

Acreage of parks 1,362.9 

Number of public schools 70 

Number of pupils 26,045 

Number of parochial schools 38 

Number of pupils 9.000 

Number of churches 292 

Number of apartment housea 154 

The average temperature for Louisville during the paat 
42 years has been 57.1 degrees. 

The First Store was opened by Daniel Broadhead in 
1783. 

The First Brick House was built in 1789. 
The First Newspaper published in Louisville was the 
"Farmer's Library," in 1807. It was followed by the 
"Louisville Gazette," in 1808. 
The First Theatre was erected in 1808. 
The First Bank (branch of the Kentuckv) was opened 
in 1812. 

The First Iron Foundry was in operation in 1812. 
First Sermon ever preached in Louisville was by a Baptist 
preacher, Squire Boone, brother of Daniel Boone. 
The First Baptist Church was built in 1815. 
The First Catholic Church was erected in 1811. 
-The First Methodist Church was erected in 1815. 
The First Presbyterian Church was erected in 1817. 
The First Episcopal Church was erected in 1824. 
The earhest Sf hools were opened in 1798. 
The First Free School was opened in Louisville in 1829 , 
with 250 pupils, with Mann Butler, the Historian, as 
Principal. The School was opened in the upper story of 
the old Baptist Church, S. W. Cor. Fifth and Green. 

First Lighted with Gas in 1840, furnished by the Louis- 
ville Gas Company, established by Charter in 1838, with 
a capital of $1,200.00 and with banking privileges, 
except as to the issue of notes. 

One of the most notable events in Louisville was the 
completion and successful inauguration in August, 1860 , 
of Louisville's first system of water works. 

Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark . 
and named for Louis XVII. 

45 



LOUISVILLE IN BRIEF— Continued. 

Population of Louisville (estimated), 1920, 234,891. 
Assessor's valuation of the taxable prop- 
erty of Louisville in 1920 is 1240,689,587.00 

The above valuation is divided as fol- 
lows: 

Land $65,238,966.00 

Improvements ?87,040,386.00 

Personal property and franchises .... 83 , 651 , 181 . 00 

Railroad and Bridge property 10,500,000.00 

The estimated yield for 1919 is 4,167,800.89 

The Tax assessment of Louisville for 
Louisville, 1920, is $1.98 on each 
SIOO.OO valuation. 

LOUISVILLE. 

Assets and liabilities. May 1, 1920 $2,344,211.75 

Assets (contingent) 1,081,109.27 

Assets (fixed) 20,877.893.61 

Total Assets $24,303,214.63 

LOUISVILLE LIABILITIES. 

Bonded debt $11,216,700.00 

Excess Assets over Liabilities $13,086,514.63 

Banking Transactions 1919 $3,716,379,941 

Bank Clearings 1919 987.225.203 

First Jail in Jefferson County was a part of a stockade 
built by George Rogers Clark on Main Street near Sixth, 
in 1778. 

Present Jailon Green Street, opposite Court House, was 
erected in 1905. 

Armory on Walnut, corner of Sixth, in which is quartered 
the First Regiment Kentucky Infantry, was built in 1905 . 

Present Court House was built in 1860. 

Present Custom House built in 1886. 

City Hall was completed and occupied in 1873. 

City Hall Annex was completed and occupied in 1907. 

Old Hospital was built in 1817. 

Present Hospital was completed in 1914. 

First Canal built in 1831. 

U. S. Weather Bureau was located in Louisville in the 
Fall of 1871. 

A cyclone struck Louisville on the afternoon of March 
27, 1890, and done considerable damage. 

Highest Sta-4e of Water in the Ohio River at Louisville 
was 46 feet 7 inches, on February 17, 1884. 

The First Regiment of Kentucky will hereafter be known 
as the 159th Regiment, U. S. A. Infantry. 

46 



LOUISVILLE WATER CO. 

H. 0. Gray, Pres., Member. 

Jas. M. Durham, V. Pres., Member. 

Members— H. B. Lee. 

Geo. Weissinger Smith, Ex-officio. 

Geo. B. Wilson, Chief Engineer and Supt. 

Chas. F. Gans, Sec. 

W.C. Nones, 

F. W. Hudson, Buyer. 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Matt H. Crawford. Daniel M. Carrell. 

Chas. Bensinger. Fred J. Drexler. 

H. T. Larimer. W. H. Kaye. 

Geo. Weissinger Smith, ex-ofi5cio. 



LOUISVILLE OF TODAY. 

(Facts and figures compiled in pamphlet and circulated 
by the Louisville "Board of Trade" Heads of Houses on 
their Trade Development Trip, June 7 to 11, 1920.) 

Louisville and Its Environment. 

Strategically situated on a wooded plateau engirdled 
by the blue hills of the Ohio River, Louisville, second 
of the South in population, and first in industry, lures by 
the lovliness of its environment of river, vale and upland, 
by the charm of its historical associations, by the whole 
heartedness of its inhabitants, and by the happiness of its 
location in the center of a great continental valley that 
Andrew Carnegie once said is destined to become "the 
workshop of the world," and is already one of the richest 
agricultural areas in the world. 

Halfway between New York and New Orleans, Louis- 
ville is set in the midst of much that is precious in memory 
to both North and South. It was General George Rogers 
Clark's seat of operations in the winning of the Northwest. 
He founded the city in 1779. He was born in Albemarle 
county, Va., November 19, 1752; died in Jefferson county, 
Ky., February 18, 1818; He sleeps in the dreamy silences 
of its Cave Hill Cemetery. 

From the Pennsylvania Railroad Bridge over the Ohio 
at Louisville one looks down to the east upon what is today 
an almost submerged island. This is Corn Island, where 
General Clark established his base at the Falls of the Ohio 
before moving against the British and Indians at Fort Vin- 
cennes. On the Kentucky shore, marked by a monument 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution, is the site 
where he established Fort Nelson and opposite on the Indi- 
ana shore is the land that was given him by the Virginia 
Legislature as a reward for military ser^nce. 

47 



In a country cemetery near Louisville is buried Gen- 
eral Zachary Taylor, "Old Rough and Ready," twelfth 
president of the United States, and the principal figure in 
the Mexican and Indian wars. But a few miles distant are 
Camp Taylor and Camp Knox, both permanent camps, 
the former the home of the world-famous First Division, 
veterans of the world war. Near the cemetery where 
"Old Rough and Ready" sleeps is the house where his 
daughter, Knoxie, was married to Jefferson Da\-is, 

Only three hours by motor from Louisville, near 
Hodgenville, Ky., enclosed in a marble memorial, is the 
cabin in which Abraham Lincoln was born. Fifty-Sve 
miles from Lincoln's birthplace is Fairview, Ky., where 
Jefferson Davis was born. There the United Confederate 
veterans are building a memorial that will be second in 
height only to Washington Monument at the National 
Capitol. 

A few miles from Louisville is the house where Prince 
Louis Phillipe lived as an exile from France. In after years 
when he became Emperor of France, he presented to the 
Cathedral of St. Joseph at Bardstown, Ky., a half dozen 
original paintings of the old masters, which can still be seen 
there. 

The Mammoth Cave of Kentucky and its greatest 
rival, the Wyandotte Cave of Indiana, are but a few hours' 
ride from Louisville. The Dixie and Jackson Highways, 
two national thoroughfares through the city, pass only a 
few miles from both the cave and the Lincoln Memorial. 
At Munford\'ille on the Dixie Highway still stands the log 
tavern where General Andrew Jackson remained over night 
on his way to Washington to be inaugurated president. 

The Midland Trail, an east and west national highway 
through Louisvnlle, follows a part of the way the trail taken 
by Daniel Boone from Cumberland Gap. At Frankfort, 
Ky., through which it passes, Boone is buried. At Lexing- 
ton, Ky., on the same trail, is Ashland, the home of Henry 
Clay. 

There is no more charming part of the Ohio, "the 
beautiful river," as LaSalle and his early French voyageurs 
called it, than the stretch between Louis^alle and Cincinnati. 
And there are few more beautiful parks in the country than 
those in the wooded hills of the Ohio at Louisville — the 
three largest, named Cherokee, Iroquios, and Shawnee for 
the Indian tribes which once had them as their hunting 
ground. In the spring when the honeysuckle and the 
locust begin to bloom, and in the fall when a blue haze 
hangs over the hills where October has turned the leaves to 
red and gold, their charm is great. Long stretches of oiled 
macadam drives make them easily accessible. 

Louisville's stately old homes, built largely by de- 
scendants of the cavaliers of Virginia, its modern business 
district, and comfortable hotel accommodations, its shaded 

48 



streets, its miles of park drives, its suburban environments, 
its parks, its historical associations, its colleges, its theologi- 
cal seminaries, its schools, and its churches all tend to make 
it a pleasant city to visit and in which to live. 

POPULATION STATISTICS. 

Louisville is the second city in population south of the 
Ohio and Potomac Rivers. 

Louis\'ille, while the 1920 U. S. census places within 
its restricted incorporated area a population of 234,891 
and a Board of Trade recheck of the Federal count in nine 
precincts showed 4^2 per cent omissions, indicating a 
population of 245,096 in the same area, really has within 
a six-mile or a seven-cent commutation car fare radius of 
its business center, a total population of 330,000. 

Just outside of the incorporated area an additional 
85,000 people reside within six-mile radius of its business 
center in such suburban communities as Oakdale, Buechel, 
Highland Park, St. Matthews, and St. Helens on the south 
side of the Ohio River; New Albany and Jeffersonville, 
Clarks\ille, Port Fulton and Silver Grove on the north. 

A total of 284,546 reside or are daily employed in the 
incorporated area of Louisville, according to the 1920 Caron 
City Directory. 

■ From 30,000 to 40,000 population will be added to 
the incorporated area by an annexation proceeding which 
passed the lower court in April, 1920. 

Division of the Federal count of population in the 
incorporated area is estimated to be as follows: 

Males. 113,688; females, 121.203. 

Whites, 192,376; white males, 93,250; white females, 
99,127. 

Negroes, 42,115; negro males, 20,690; negro females, 
21,825. 

Native-born, 216,269; foreign-born, 18,622. 

Population percentages as to sex, race, etc., in the 
incorporated area are estimated as follows: 

Males, 48.4%; females, 51.6%. 

Whites, 81.9%; negroes, 18.1%. 

White males, 39.7%; white females, 42.2%. 

Negro males, 8.8%; negro females, 9.3%. 

Native-born, 92.2%; foreign-born, 7.8%,. 

There are 58,500 families in Louisville, and 47,410 
dwellings and apartment houses. More than 40 per cent 
of the families of the city own their own homes. 

Louisville was the nearest large city to the center of 
population of the United States when the last decennial 
census was published, and to all indications will hold the 
same distinction when the 1920 report is made public. 

INDUSTRIAL STATISTICS. 

Louisville is the most important manufacturing city 
south of the Ohio and Potomac Rivers. 

The annual value of its manufactured product, accord- 
ing to the last U. S. census of manufactures, was $36,000,000 



greater than that of New Orleans, its nearest competitor in 
the South. 

It is the twenty-fourth city of the country in value of 
its manufactured product, according to the last published 
report of the U. S. Census Bureau. 

The value of its industrial products in 1919 was $313,- 
000,000. 

It produces over 25,000 different articles. 

A total of over 1,000 factories will be reported by 
the 1920 Federal census, and the Louisville Industrial 
Foundation reports 550 major plants. 

Its industrial establishments include among others: 
65 woodworking, 62 metal-working, 30 tobacco-working, 
70 printing and engraving, 35 clothing, 17 leather-working, 
9 paint manufacturing, 7 varnish manufacturing, 7 textile 
mills, 5 passenger and freight elevator plants, 4 oil refineries. 

Industrial relations are most harmonious. Louis\ille 
is an avowed open-shop town. Practically all of its labor 
is American-born, and strikes are inconsequential. 

A public corporation with a capital of $1,000,000 to 
promote the growth and development of factories exists 
in Louisville. It was created and is controlled by the 
Louisville Board of Trade, and is known as the Louisville 
Industrial Foundation. 

The Waterside Station of the Louisville Gas & Elec- 
tric Company has a capacity of 75,000 horse power, and 
electricity is afforded manufacturers at attractive rates. 

Easy rail access to the eastern and western Kentucky 
coal fields with river transportation from the Pennsylvania 
and West Virginia fields makes fuel costs among the very 
lowest in the country. 

Factories are afforded great advantages by city and 
state tax systems. "The difference between Louisville's 
tax rate on industries and that of competing cities is so 
heavily in Louisville's favor," says the Industrial Founda- 
tion, "that in twenty years, in some cases, an industry will 
save enough money in taxes to pay the cost of the entire 
plant." 

Total authorized capital stock of industrial incorpora - 
tion? between January 1 and May 1, 1920, was $9,622,000; 
total estimated cost of new and projected plants and plant 
additions, $9,146,000; total industrial capital increases 
$6,950,000. 

More than 42,000 workers are employed in its facto- 
ries, di\aded as follows: 

Skilled, 23,045; unskilled, 19,049. 

White male, 32,540; skilled, 18,289; unskilled, 13,711. 

White female, 5.333; skilled, 3,132; unskilled, 2,201. 

Negro male, 3,341; skilled. 896; unskilled 2,245. 

Negro female, 1,398; skilled, 723; unskilled, 675. 

Foreign-born, male, 22; skilled, 5; unskilled, 17. 

50 



Industrial workers are divided among various lines of 
production as follows: 

Total Skilled Unskilled 

Iron-working 11,669 7,121 4,548 

Wood-working 6,418 3,409 3,009 

Tobacco-working 5 , 905 3 , 549 2,356 

Clothing 3,410 2,174 1,236 

Printing and allied trades 2,000 

Shoes, tannerj', harness 1,549 1 ,061 488 

Textile 1,518 279 1,239 

Piano and organ 655 536 119 

Soaps and powders 647 333 314 

Candy 481 179 302 

Perserves, pickles, vinegar 480 213 267 

Butchers nd packers 470 150 320 

Paint and varnish 479 170 309 

Paper box 462 150 132 

Creameries 351 112 239 

Flour and grit mills 318 52 266 

Stone-working 272 135 137 

Bakeries 277 210 67 

Bedding and pillow 208 32 176 

FertiUzer 127 15 112 

COMMERCIAL STANDING. 

Louisville is one of the two largest commercial centers 
south of the Ohio River. 

In banking debits to individual account, which the 
Federal Reserve Board says are the best criterion of the 
business activities of a community, it is averaging at the 
present time a monthly showing which will take it well 
over the $2,000,000,000 mark in 1920. 

In banking debits it is the twenty-fifth city of the 
country, ranking thus far in 1920 ahead of Memphis, 
Atlanta, St. Paul, Columbus, Toledo, and similar centers. 

It now does a jobbing business estimated at §750,000- 
000 annually, and a retail business of $100,000,000 anrually. 

Its bank deposits amount to more than $100,000,000. 

It has twelve national and state banks and trust com- 
panies, a Federa 1 Farm Loan Bank for the Kentucky-Indiana 
-Ohio-Tennessee District, and a branch of the St. Louis 
Federal Reserve Bank. 

There are in the city 5,500 mercantile stores, about 
1,200 of which do a wholesale business in whole or part. 

Louisville, as the metropolis of Kentucky, which pro- 
duces one-third of all the tobacco grovm in the United 
States, is the world's greatest hogshead tobacco market, 
having offerings in 1919 of 89,449,200 pounds of tobacco. 

It is the foremost livestock market south of the Ohio 
River, doing a business of $80,000,000 annually. 

Its fine location and accessibility make it a popular 
convention center. It entertained during 1919 a total of 
125 conventions. 

51 



Its postoffice receipts for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1919, amounted to $1,935,286. 

There are more citizens in Louisville worth $5,000 for 
each 1,000 population according to a national insurance 
companj''s statistics, than in any city of the United States 

Building construction in the incorporated area of 
Louisville had, up until May 1, averaged during 1920 only 
$12,000 less than one million dollars a month. 

TRANSPORTATION ADVANTAGES. 

Louisville combines the advantages of steam rail, 
electric rail and Ohio River Transportation. 

It is served by nine railroad systems: the Baltimore & 
Ohio; the Chesapeake & Ohio; the Chicago, Indianapolis & 
Louisville; the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis; 
the Illinois Central; the Louisville & Nash-ville; the Louis- 
ville, Henderson and St. Louis; the Pennsylvania Lines, 
and the Southern. 

It is served by 50,995 miles of direct steam railway 
mileage, being the sixth city of the United States in this 
particular. 

It has direct rail connection with all of the principa 
seaports between Boston and New Orleans. 

It has 463 miles of steam railway mileage in the city. 

The capacity of its industrial and team tracks is 12,- 
345 cars. 

Fifty-eight steam passenger trains arrive in the city 
daily, and the same number depart from it. 

It has nine steam railway passenger stations or station 
stops, and ten steam railway freight depots. 

It is served by eight interurban electric railways, op- 
erating 230 miles of line in Kentucky and Indiana. 

It has two interurban electric passenger stations. 

It has 178 miles of single-track city railway. 

Louisville's city and subiu'ban railways operate 600 
cars, and carry 80,000,000 passengers annually. There 
is all-night service to practically all parts of the city. 

Its city railway rolling stock is imsurpassed in the 
country. 

It has three double-track bridges across the Ohio 
River — all three serving steam railways, two interurban 
railways. 

It is on the Ohio River, which is soon to have a nine 
foot stage for 967 miles from Pittsburgh to Cairo. 

It is one of the best inland harbors in the country. 

It is soon to have a modern $100,000 municipal river 
terminal. 

It has three river packet companies and one river 
ferry company. 

Daily passenger freight service is supplied on the Ohio 
between Louisville and Cincinnati, 

52 



It has 16,000 motor vehicles. 

There are 339 miles of streets in Louisville, 240 of 
which are paved. 

It has three national thoroughfares — the Dixie High- 
way, the Jackson Highway, and the Midland Trail. 

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES. 

Louisville is one of the foremost education centers of 
tilt country. Students from botli the old and new world 
attend its educational institutions. 

It has rapidly growing municipal university, with col- 
lege of arts and science, law, medicine and dentistry, with 
enrollment of 700 students. 

It has Baptist and Presbyterian Theological Sem- 
inaries. 

It has two law schools, a college of pharmacy, and a 
negro university. 

Its total school enrolhnent of 45,000 includes: 30,000 
in the public schools; 10,300 in parochial schools; 5,000 in 
private schools. 

There are 900 teachers in the public schools of the 
city, whose minimum wage the Board of Education plans 
to make Sl,200 starting with September, 1920. There are 
300 teachers in the parochial schools. 

Public school buildings are valued at $5,000,000, al- 
though it would take $10,000,000 to reproduce them. 

Its public school sj'stem has been entirely divorced 
from political control. 

It has 70 public schools, 39 parochial schools, 19 pri- 
vate schools. 

It has 270 churches. 

Its public library system, with a main library and 
eleven branches and 220,000 volumes, stood, in 1919, 
fourth in the entire country in per capita circulation with 
a total circulation of 992,000. Its public library property, 
according to the U. S. Census Bureau, is valued at more 
than any city of under 500,000 population in the country. 

It has Central, Railroad and Negro Y. M. C. A. build- 
ings; a Y. M. H. A. building, and a Y. W. C. A. building, 
all largely patronized. 

One million dollars' worth of new buildings are planned 
by the College of Arts and Sciences of the University of 
Louisville from the proceeds of a bond issue to be voted 
on next November. 

RECREATION AND AMUSEMENTS. 

Residents of Louisville and visitors to the city find 
ample opportunity for recreation and amusement. 

The city's park system is its particular pride. Two 
of its larger parks, in natural attraction, are easily among 
the most beautiful in the country. 

It has in all 23 parks and playgrounds, containing 
1,365 acres, penetrated by 35.2 miles of oiled macadam 
parkways. 

53 



There are 55 public tennis courts in its parks, 22 
baseball diamonds, two swimming pools, and one public 
golf course. 

The foremost dramatic artists of the world are seen 
at Louisville's theaters, 35 in all, including motion picture 
shows. 

The city has in its environs four country clubs, two 
with 18-hole golf courses and one with a 9-hole course. 
It also has two boat clubs on the Ohio River. 

As the metropolis of the State, where the thoroughbred 
has attained fame, Louisville has forty days of racing each 
year. One race, the Kentucky Derby, is one of the two 
most famous races in the world. It has been run for 
almost half a century, and in 1920 attracted 70,000 visitors 
to Chm-chill Downs, every State in the Union and many 
foreign countries being represented. 

Louisville has eleven private and amusement parks, in 
addition to its public parks. 

It is one of the foremost amateur baseball centers of 
the country, and has a professional team in the American 
Association, including Minneapolis, St. Paul, Kansas City, 
Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Columbus, and Toledo. 

MISCELLANEOUS FACTS. 

The total assessment of property for all purposes of 
taxation is $360,000,000. 

The total value of all property owned by the municipal 
government is S24,313,214. 

The total indebtedness of the city government is 
$11,216,000. 

The unexercised borrowing power of the city is $12,- 
983,000. 

The value of the municipal water plant is $12,000,000. 

The Louisville Water Company has a daily capacity 
1 12,000,000 gallons of pure, filtered water, which is greater 
than the total combined capacity of municipal water plants 
in every State in the Union with the exception of six. 

Hospitals and charitable institutions, including a 
$1,000,000 City Hospital, are valued at $2,100,000. 

Parks and playgrounds are valued at $2,300,000. ■ 

The city tax rate is $1.98, including schools. 

The registered male vote of the city in 1919 was 52,000. 
^ The incorporated land area of the city is 14,348.8 
acres; the incorporated water area, 2,816 acres.* An an- 
nexation proceeding passed by ths lower court in April, 
1920, will add,8,000 acres. 

LOUISVILLE CONDENSED FACTS. 

Audubon Bird Museum — Contains one of America's 
largest and finest collections. 

Automobile Show — America's third largest annual 
exposition. 

Automobile Tires— Largest manufacturing concern 
in the south. 

Ax e Handles — One of the largest factories in the world. 

54 



Bank — •Capitalization of fourteen institutions, $8,931,- 
111; surplus. S7,266,000; deposits, $100,000,000; clearings 
for 1918, $1,159,922,941; an increase of 13.2 per cent; total 
transactions, $4,202,555,000, an increase of 38.8 per cent. 

Banks— Fourteen. Also a Federal Land Bank and a 
Federal Reserve. 

Baseball Bats— Biggest factory in the world. "Ty" 
Cobb, "Babe" Ruth and every member of the Champion 
"White Sox" and Champion "Reds" swing Louisville war 
clubs. 

Bathtubs — Largest plant in the world engaged in the 
manufacture of bathtubs and enameled iron and brass 
plumbing supplies. 

Blind Prinlshop— The world's largest printing establish- 
ment for the blind is situated in Louis\'ille. Its texts are 
printed in English, Spanish, French, German and Latin and 
used in every civilized country. 

Boulevards— Sixty miles. Cost $1,500,000; annual 
maintenance expense of? 150,000. 

Bourbon Stock Yards— Largest in the South. Annual 
clearings $75,000,000. 

Buttons— The largest exclusive bachelor button factory 
in the world. 

Camp Henry Knox — 'Permanent artillery cantonment 
Stithton, Ky., thirty-two miles distant— an hour's ride by 
rail or auto. 

Camp Zachary Taylor — One of the largest permanent 
army cantonments. Thirty minute ride on a five-cent car 
line. 

Cathedral of the Assumption— Roman Catholic. Old- 
est west of the Alleghenies, and at the time of construction 
was the highest in the United States. The diocese of 
Louisville shares with the dioceses of Philadelphia, Boston 
and New York the distinction of being the oldest in America 
after Baltimore. 

Cement — Largest factory in the United States. 

Chemicals — Louisville is an important center for the 
manufacture of fertilizer and insecticide products. 

Churches — 270. Assessed valuation of church prop- 
erty $8,296,208. 

Climate— Covering a period of forty-five years, the 
monthly mean temperature for four seasons follows: Jan- 
uary, 34.9; April, 56.3; July, 78.7; October, 58.7. The 
city is 462 feet above sea level. 

Clothing— Thirty-five factories. 

Coal— Louisville manufacturers are assured a cheap 
and plentiful supply. 

Coast Guard — Only inland U. S. Life Saving Station. 

Conventions — More than 125 annually. 

County Government— Commission form. 

Drugs— The largest distributing point in the south. 

Dry Goods— The largest market in the south-central 
states. 

Educational Institutions— Municipal university, with 
colleges of arts and sciences, law, medicine and dentistry ; 

55 



fifty-nine graded public, five special and four high schools 
valued at $5,124,807.32 and controlled by nonpolitical 
Board of Education ; sixty-six private and religious schools. 

Financial Strength— With a bonded debt of $11,000,000, 
or less than 5 per cent of $229,000,044, tax valuation, Louis- 
ville's unexercised borrowing power exceeds all existing 
municipal obligations. 

Farm Implements— Louisville is one of the world's 
largest centers for the manufacture of plows, tillage and 
harvesting implements. 

Fine Horses— World's saddle horse championship, with 
$10,000 stake, contested annually at Kentucky State Fair. 

Fish — United States hatchery in Louisville supplies 
a 11 streams in Central Mississippi Valley. 

Furniture — Sixteen factories produce a fulUine of house- 
liold, bank, store and office. 

Grain — Louis-ville is one of the largest grain terminals 
in the country and one of the five largest in the world. The 
elevator capacity exceeds 3.000,000 bushels and the invest- 
ment in the grain and milling industry is over $8,000,000. 

Golf — Four of the finest courses in America. 

Handles — Sixty per cent of the hickory handles in the 
world are manufactured in Louisville. 

Hardware — Largest wholesale market in south and 
southwest; second largest in the United States. 

Hats — ^Largest factory in the southwest and is the 
largest jobbing market in the south. 

Highways — Louisville is situated on the Dixie High- 
way, Roosevelt National Highway, Jackson Highway, 
Midland Trail and Boone (or Cumberland) Trail. 

Hospitals— Louisville maintains a $1,000,000 munici- 
pal hospital equipped with 500 beds, having 150 employes, 
100 nurses, 100 staff physicians and eighteen internes. 
Several religious and private hospitals and sanitariums. 

Homes— 35,000, 25 per cent of which are owned by per- 
sons living in them. 

Hotels — Superior in quality to those of most cities of 
equal size, and catering especially to conventions. 

Theaters— Thirty-four. 

Ice Machinery— The largest manufacturer of absorp- 
tion, ice and refrigerating machinery in the world is in 
Louisville. 

Leather — Seventeen industries. 

Interurban Lines — Nine electric interurban lines. 
Trains running as far as the Bluegrass region of Kentucky 
and Indianapolis, Ind. 

Libraries — The Louisville Free Public Library, cost- 
ing $435,614.77, is an exquisite specimen of Louis XVI 
architecture and contains 220,000 volumes. Eight branch 
libraries cost $230,834.13 

Light and Heat— One of the newest and most modern 
gas and electric plants in the country. 

Live Stock — The most important market in the south. 

Manufacturing — 510 factories, engaged in seventy 
different lines, employing 35,000 operatives. Value of man- 

56 



ufactured products in 1918 was $234,000,000, an increase 
of40 per cent over 1917. , 

Metals — Sixty-five iron and metal working industries — 
ton factories manufacture gray iron, crucible steel, brass, 
bronze and aluminum castings. 

Masonic Home — Oldest Masonic Widows and Orphan's 
Home in America. 

Mortality Rate— 14.18 per cent. Lower than the aver- 
age death rate of registered area of the United States. 

Navigation— Freight and excursion steamers ply the 
Ohio all the year round. Finest inland harbor in America. 

Onions— Biggest market in the world. 

Organs and Pianos— One of the largest factories in 
the world, and largest exclusive pipe organ factory in the 
United States. 

Plows— One of the four largest plow factories in the 
world. 

Potatoes— Biggest market in the world. 

Petroleum— Two oil refineries with a daily capacity 
in excess of 8,000 barrels. 

Poultry- One of the largest poultry and egg markets 
in America. 

Parks and Playgrounds— Louisville has thirteen public 
parks, comprising 1,36.5.7 acres of land, and twenty-three 
playgrounds of over eighty acres. Value $2,286,556.95. 
Cherokee Park is one of the most beautiful natural parks 
in the world. Band concerts during the summer. 

Paints and Varnish— Nine factories. The largest 
paint manufacturing city in the south or southwest. 

Paved Streets— 240 miles. 

Racing — Kentucky Derby, world's greatest racing 
classic. 

Railway Mileage^-In respect to total mileage of rail- 
roads entering, Louisville is the sixth American city. 

Shipping— Louis\ille terminals handle 80,000 tons of 
freight daily. 

Slums — Louisville is free from the regular tenement 
districts, such as is found in most of the larger cities. 

Sewers— 280 miles. 

Soap — The largest factory in the south; seventh largest 
in the United States. 

Stock Yards- The most modern in the world. 

Street Cars— Louisville is one of the few larger cities 
which still have the five-cent street car fare and the univer- 
sal transfer system. One hundred and eighty-five miles 
of electric car lines. 

Theological Seminaries — Two. Southern Baptist, 
largest in the world. Has appropriated $5,000,000 for 
building an entirely new plant. Presbyterian, whose main 
building is world-renowned as a perfect specimen of the 
Collegiate-Gothic, or Oxford, style of architecture. 

Tax Rate — $1.98 on the $100. New factories are given 
five years' exemption . 

Tobacco — World's greatest market and manufactur- 

57 



ing center. Annual sales exceed 40,000 hogsheads. Thirty 
large factories, 6,(J00 employes. 

U. S. Quartermaster Depot— Third largest in the 
country. 

Wagons — Largest factory in the world. 

Waterworks— $15,500,000 municipally owned plant 
under nonpolitical management. Capacity sufficient for 
150,000 additional population. Meter rate of 4 cents per 
1,000 gallons to large consumers is lowest in the United 
States and was not increased during the war. 

Wood Boxes— Largest factory in the world. 

Woodworking — Sixty-seven factories. 

POINTS OF INTEREST IN OR NEAR THE HEART 
OF THE CITY. 

(Courtesy of Louisville Convention and Publicity League.) 

Jefferson County Armory, the ideal building for big 
conventions. Greater floor space than Madison Square 
Garden. Walnut street. Center to Sixth. 

United States Life Saving Station. Only inland station 
in the United States. Foot of Third street 

Louisville Free Public Library, with 2'iOOOO volumes. 
Daily papers from all leading cities are on file. The library 
building also contains an art museum. Library Place, 
between Third and Fourth streets. 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Broadway, 
between Fourth and Fifth streets. 

Southern Presbjrterian Theological Seminary. First 
street and Broadway. 

Tobacco Breaks, with sales from 10 to 12 o'clock. The 
largest +obacco market in the world. Main street, from 
Eighth to Twelfth 

Louisville and Portland Canal and Locks, Kentucky side 
Ohio River Take Eighteenth street car 

Kentucky Institute for the Blind, and American Printing 
House for the Blind. Largert printing establisljnent of 
the kind in the world Frankfort avenue and State street. 

Thomas Jefferson Statue, in front of Court House. 
Jefferson street, between Fifth and Sixth 

Joel T. Hart's Statue of Henry Clay, Rotunda of 
Court House. 

Confederate Monument. Head of Third Avenue boule- 
vard 

United States Custom House and Post Office. Fourth 
and Chestnut streets 

Cave Hill Cemeterj' and National Burial Ground. At 
head of Broadway. 

Bourbon Stock Yards, the South's greatest live stock 
market. Head of Market street. 

Mafionic Widows' and Orphans' Home. First of its kind 
in the coimtry. Second and Bloom avenue. 

New $400,000 Y. M. C. A. Building. Third and Broad- 
way, 

58 



New $200,000 Y. VV. C. A. Second and Broadway. 
New $100,000 Y. M. H. A. Second and College. 
Corn Island, the spot where Gen. George Rogers Clark 
(founder of Louisville) and party landed in 1778. Foot of 
Tenth street 

The Troost collection. 

The Professor G. H. McConolly (private) collection. 

The Cabbage and Mrs. Wiggs House and Cabbage 
Patch settlement house. 

The Pioneer Memorial Fountain, 12th and Rowan. 

The Pioneer Monument 7th and Main. 

The Henry Clay Statue in Court House. 

George D. Prentice statue and bust of Lincoln and 
Cawein and other treasures at the Public Library. 

Daniel Boone statue, Cherokee Park. 

The old George Rogers Clark Home (ruins in Camp 
Zachary Taylor, near Polar Level Road. 

POINTS OF INTEREST ON THE CITY'S EDGE 

Kentucky State Fair and TJ. S. Fish Hatcheries Take 
West Broadway or West Walnut street cars. 

Churchill Downs, where the famous "Kentucky Derby" 
is run each sprmg. The finest mile track on the continent 
TaJie Fourth avenue cars, via Seventh street. 

Douglas Park, scene of the annual "Kentucky Futurity." 
Take Fourth street car?, via Third street. 

Falls of the Ohio and bird's-eye view of Louisville. Take 
"Big Red Car" over Big Four Bridge, returning via New 
Albany and K. & 1. Bridge. 

Coiiederate Veterans' Home. Take Interurban car to 
Pewee Valley. 

United States Quartermaster's Depot. Take car or ferry 
to Jeffersonville. 

Reservoir Park and Three Million Dollar Filtration 
Plant. Crescent Hill. Take East Walnut street car. 

New Albany and Jeffersonville, the hustling cities of 
Southern Indiana. Reached by three bridges ovct the 
Ohio. Ferry also runs to Jeffersonville 

Howard's Ship Yards. Jeffersonville. One of the largest 
boat-building plants on inland waters in America. 

Fern Grove, a completely equipped summer resort and 
picnic grounds on the banks of the beautiful Ohio River. 
Take boat foot of First street 

U. S. Cantomnent (Camp Taylor), take Main and 
Preston Street cars or Market, Jefferson, Walnut, Chestnut 
and Broadway car going East and transfer to Preston Street 
car. 



59 



DISTANCES FROM LOUISVILLE 

Compiled by the Louisville Automobile Club. 

Milea 

Louisville to Anchorage, Ky. 14.8 

Athertonville, Ky 56.0 

Bardstown, Ky 39.2 

Brownsboro, Ky 19.4 

Bloomfield, Ky 43.0 

Bedford, Ind 76.1 

Bowling Green, Ky 119.5 

Buffalo, Ky 67.2 

Blue Lick Springs, Ky 117.6 

Crestwood, Ky 21.0 

Columbus, Ind 80.8 

Cincinnati, Ohio 136.2 

Charlestown, Ind .-- 14.9 

Corydon, Ind 27.0 

Cave City, Ky .-. 88.8 

Carhsle, Ky 104.0 

Covington, Ky 139.1 

Cynthiana, Ky 91.6 

Camp Nelson 100.0 

Danville, Ky 85.4 

Eminence, Ky 42.1 

Elizabethtown, Ky 45.3 

Evansville, Ind 184.7 

French Lick, Ind 58.0 

Frankfort, Ky 51.6 

Franklin, Kv...- 152.7 

Graeffenburg, Ky 42.8 

Glasgow, Ky ..- 107.6 

Georgetown, Ky... 69.0 

Harrodsburg, Ky 74.7 

Highbridge, Ky 83.0 

Indianapolis, Ind- 124.2 

Jeffersonville, Ind 1.3 

Jeffersontown, Ky 11.6 

Lagrange, Ky 29.3 

Lincoln Farm, Ky- 60.0 

Lexington, Ky 78.7 

Lancaster, Ky 114.7 

Lebanon, Ky 68.1 

Middletown, Ky 12.4 

Mammoth Cave, Ky 99.3 

Madison, Ind 49.0 

Munfordville, Ky 76.6 

Midway, Ky 64.0 

Maysville, Ky 142.0 

Millersburg, Kv. 106.4 

Mt. Sterling, Ky 117.6 

New Albany Ind 5.3 

Nashville, by Jackson Highway 194 . 

Nashville. Tenn., by Dixie Highway... 204.0 
New Haven, Ky 53.5 

60 



Miles 

Louisville to Nicholasville, Ky 92.0 

Olympian Springs, Ky 133.2 

Paoli, lud 46.9 

Perrj'ville, Ky 75.4 

Paris, Ky 97.2 

Shepherdsville, Ky 21.1 

Seymour, Ind 61.3 

Salem, Ind 38.1 

Shelbyville, Ky 30.5 

Springfield, Ky . 58.2 

Scottsville, Ky 134.1 

Shakertown. Ky 81.7 

St. Louis, Mo _ 285.0 

Taylorsville, Kv 33.2 

Terre Haute, Ind 192.2 

Vincennes, Ind 129.6 

Versailles, Ky 65.9 

Vevay, Ind . . 74.8 

West Point, Ky . 24.5 

Williamstown, Kv 103.5 

West Baden, Ind 56.0 

Winchester, Ky 98.0 

LONG DISTANCE ITINERARIES FROM 

Louisville to Atlanta, Ga 476.0 

Baltimore.Md 584.0 

Bar Harbor, Me 1,404.7 

Boston, Mass . 1,084.18 

Chicago, 111 321.6 

Cleveland, Ohio 393.0 

Los Angeles, Cal 2,564.4 

Memphis. Tenn 377.0 

Miami,Fla 1,417.3 

" Minneapolis, Minn 799.3 

New Orleans, La_ 976.9 

New York Citv 838.6 

Philadelphia, Pa 790.0 

Pittsburg, Pa 443.0 

San Francisco, Cal... 2,701.3 

Seattle, Wash 3,056.5 

Toledo. Ohio 344.8 

Traverse City, Mich 592 . 2 

Washington, D. C 544.0 

White Mountains 1,274.5 



61 



5S 





:-• 




fj 








S 












et 




^ 








o 




z 








!5 












S 




_ 












U 




















O, 


CO 


i. 


UJ 








t- 


-/7 






u 


r- 






7 


■e 


2 








or 


> 


Hi 


2. 


< 


3 


z 


■n 






llJ 


^ 


$ 


"rJ 


K 


n 


Ui 




00 


_: 


ro 


*j 


ij 




J 




2 


jj 


< 


^ 


K 




co 








O 






o 




>I 




z 




>• 




o 




vi 




t=^ 



SlOlOIM>0-^(M^t^COC0050<M-^a>i-iO<-it»0(M05CO 



■--to Ttl •* t^ IC ■^ ■<»< 00 50 C« -^ IC I " ~ 



jeot^i— ia»«oo»ooe<i 



t— COTj<c>qcDCMC5C<3»OI>-lMr^uDOO(M005OOt^00«Dt^«O 

(M r^ cc Tti 05 Tf o> '— 1 05 in 00 »-< 00 o t^ 05 OS 00 

ooooscco-^^-^o^oooooot^eoosM 



2-Hooo 






r^oo t^o o ■ 



_2^ 



• c^ O 
) (M lO 

1 ■<*<»o 



C^<Mt»<<Mt-hOC0C0«O 



1 C^ O 03 C^ <M 0> 
; t^ -^ lO C5 •"!< <N 



(Mrt(M<Mt^in»-iCOOO'^00«0-^i 



^5§ 



CC SO(M ■* CC i-H T-l 



mcoo»-it~-«0'— icaoor-it^ooiot^r^oooo 

■ C^ OlOOO 

■*oo»ooo 



I CO o 



OOiOOSOC^OlOOO 



^ ^ <M 



•CO lO 00005 -^(M >-i _. _ __ 

SoOt^O05t^t^0000t^-«l<CC 



) O CO t^ C<l U? CO 



CO (M CO CO < 



OO -H ic 
Oi oo t^ 



00 I~~ I 



>iO (M (M ^ ■ 



00 OS 02 CO 

CO CO >n 05 
■*-<j<coO 






>o t^ CO — ■ t^ — ■ 



( C: lO c 
. r^ CO 5 
I coo ■ 



. ■<* (M -H -,»< 

. lo a> coo 



— ooco 



■*lCO ^ CO<M 



CO I^ t^ o o o 



coos t 
cooo c 



1 oo 00 cfl r- 

> lOCO ^" 

1 cot^ 



) lO CO lO CO -^ t^ 



> t^ -< ic »*i 00 r^ c^ 

) ■<*< lO 00 CO CM -^ lO 



CO c-q ■ 

05 ■«*< < 
tr~ CO I 



I lO -H 00 ( 
• t^ IM OI 

■— CO 



os'^cocMOcooco-^cqoo-^iO-- _. , 

o>coc^oo<Mu:i»o»-i»-iT-it^i:^co>-icot^>:*<oo-^m 

■<*<005COOOOt^»0-^OOOlC05C<lT»<CSl - 



O t-Ci 

>*O0 rt 
O CO "-c T}< 



) ^ •* O T-l ■*! ^ 00 t 



) CO 00 00 o o 



^=1= 



J-*'<*i(M^OO(M-*CD 

)05(Mt-<MCO»0-^05->*<t^lMOO 



O IC t-- >*<■>*< 1 

•* t^ r^ 00 1^ > 

<M05 Cq O M( 



; CO »o t^ ^ CO ' 



1 (M CO C5 -^ -^ t_ _ 

! (M t^ CO ■*000 ■* lO 00 CO CO c^ < 



1COC005005'— 'lO-HTj<(Mir-000 



codiioicoocoo^ 
I>-00(MOt:^005C<l 



- — CO CO oco ( 



• -^ CSl 

I CO o 



C^(3JiO-*iOOCCOI^OOiO-<S<l 



m lO CO 

— •* r^ 



)t^<M(Mt^-*it-->*ico-HO(M-^cstnco<M03^r~r-<M 



_. i-^rt»OOOCOC0003--<0(ML'5(MOOTj<- 

'-ic<iTi<a>t^>ocoocococor^oo-«tiooo5co» 



^ CO ^ 



^ «8 a 2 



^ ui 



•^^'i 



■;§ 






.2^" >> 









62 



^ CO cs 00 »n o Tj< Tt< <N o ■* »o CO o 00 Ttt CO t^ «o c* 



CO -^O) ■* ■^oo 

o ^ ^ o -"tie^ 

O CO<M CO ^ c<i 



Tf<cot-~5jcoc^oc':oio-«*'' 



COOKoO'-ioO'-ic^lMOO-H 
C<l<MrtC0»OO-^t^-HC0CV)00<Mt^ 



•^oio-^osor^t^m 



I — CO CO M 



•t^050000'*<-^->*<CO(MT»lC^'^05t^t^OOOOCO'-< 
•COOOOCS|rtt^t^iOOOOCOa5«0<MlC'>*'05»0»0< 



C<l C^ <M ^ — -H 



T*< «C CC lO t^ t-- 

•-I <M OO O 05 C3 
O 05 05 O 05 CS 



C5 00 JT) CO T»< 
t^ t^ O lO CO 



000500-^00»005>COi03'«*<»OO-^Oi"5 

t— — I 02 CD OO lO O " " 

CO ^ 005 OiC CO 



^ CO C^ — < ^ ' 



lO 50 00 CO 05 t^ 
OO <M tl CO <M »0 

r~ oo t^ 00 00 1^ 



(M ^ cc CO -^ ; 
t^t^coco < 



, . _ T-H t^ CO 05 (M m o m 

ilOC500-*COCOt^<MiO«5-^OOOC<llO 
— C<I CO (N — < 



oe •* lo o CO •»*< < 

05 <0 CO CO Tjl ■* ! 

O «>• -^ lO '-H T«( ( 



,OTt<c0l>.0000-H00'-<C0I-^00C00S' 
I «0 CO l^ -1 CO •>*i CO I ' ~ 



O — lO CO CO ( 

oc oc c; -^ CO I 

t^ t^ O C^ •* 1 



• CO t^l-- Tf 

) lO t^ CD 05 
I -^00 00 -H 



COr-l 
OO^ 



■ t^ lO 05 o oo • 



CO CO CO CO -H CO CO -H ■ 



I c: 00 CD O Tf I 

'Oo5coS< 



lO UO o t^ 



t^ t^ T)< -^ TltCO ■ 

co' C^{ CO* -< 



03 CO ITS 00 CO -^ ' 
CO CO t— CO t^ 00 1 

O CD »0 CO O lO t 



• 05 CO lO 
i -^t* 00 05 _ _ 

• OCDt^lOCOOOlClt^'^ 



i-»t<00O5lO"0I^'*<CDCD< 



CO lO CO »o 
CO CI c^ 



t^ CO t^ 

«> «co 

CO « ■^ 



H>. t^ CD OO 00 C 



ico-*oooou:>Tt(-H-i*<couocC'-cot^i>.ioo 



>— liOlOCDCO-Hiot^-^OCOC 



icor-..-icocoo>cot^oo5t^( 

I rt ^"^■"co'co'co* ^ 



.00t^-^-<*<>OCOiCC0C0O-^O- 

icococoir^-Hco-*iOt^coi>-co- 

I lO >0 CO CD i-H CO •»!< »0 ■^ T^ CO ■ 



I O 00 CO -^05 



lO lO 00 

CO CT> in 

Tjl t^ Tfl 



-H CO —c 



I r^ t>. -^ii 

) 00COO3 

I ^ T»<00 



CO CO T-i -H ^ 



. CO r- ^ ^ lo -"jt 



I O) CD CO CO 

^oo t^ CO 

r CO CO co" 



SSI 



03 00 cs o < 



> CO -^ CO o CO O -^ 

I 05 CO '^ t^ O t^ 00 
1 CO O O 00 O •<*< CO 



2Si 



I CO C3 o) CO CO r^ 



— CD 0> CO CO 
CO 00 l-r- 
eo CO CO 



CDiO-H-tt<CO-^OOCOCOCOiflC<ICOCC 
C20S3-<*ICCCS03CO-<*H:^05CDCO-'-- 
•*■>*< -^ CO CO •-! IC CO CO CO O CO ( 






a &c 



4) g 









63 



CITY RAILROAD TICKET OFFICES. 

Office, 1st floor Todd Building, 4th and Market 

DEPOTS AND TRAIN CONNECTIONS. 

Central Station, 7th and River-Big Four Route, Southern 
Railway 1 C. R R , B. & 0. S.-W. R. R.. C & 0. R'y. 
K &TBridge&R.R. Cumber' and. Mam m 

Union Station 10th and Broadway— L. H. & St. L. R y, 
L & N. R. R., Monon Route, Pennsylvania Lines. Cum- 
berland', Main 4500. 

FREIGHT DEPOTS. 

B. & 0. S. W. R. R., 15th and Main. Home, City 255. 
Cumberland, Main 255. 

Big Four Route, Preston and Main. Cumberland, 
Main 1441. Home, City 292. 

C & 0. R'y, Preston and Main. Cumberland, Main 
1441. ' Home, City 292. 

niinois Central R. R., 12th and Rowan. Home, City 
5793. Cumberland, Main 4220. 

L. H. & St. L. R'y, 9th and Broadway. Home, City 
502. Cumberland, Main 4509. 

L & N R. R., 1st and Water. Cumberland, Main 
4500. ' Home, City 4500. 

L. & N. R. R., 9th and Broadway. Cumberland, Mam 
4500. Home, City 4500. 

Monon Route, 14th and Main. Home, City 234. 
Cumberland, Main 234. 

Pennsylvania Lines, 13th and Jefferson anbound). 
Cumberland, Main 4400. Home City 264. 

Pennsylvania Lines, 13th and Jefferson (Outbound). 
Cumberland, Main 4400. Home, City 2242. 

Southern R'y, 13th and High. Home City 2131. 
Cumberland, Main 3303. 



64 



CAMP TAYLOR. 

Camp Taylor, the sixth largest army encampment in 
the United States, is located just outside the City Limits 
of Louisville, along Preston Street and Poplar Level Roads. 
It is reached by the Southern Railway and by the electric 
cars of the Louisville Street Railway. 

The reservation consists of something more than 2,500 
acres, 1,450 of which are used as a maneuver ground, and 
the balance for barracks, hospital, stables, warehouses 
and remount station. The latter has a capacity of 11,000 
animals. The men in training aggregate 42,000 and con- 
sist of 36,000 Infantry and 11,000 Field Artillery. These 
are made up of all of the National Army men from the 
States of Kentucky and Indiana, and about 10,000 from 
Illinois. The soldiers are housed in permanent wooden 
camp structures, supplied with city water and electric 
lights. These, together with a complete system of sewers 
and siu-face water drainage, make Camp Taylor one of 
the most healthful to be found. Five miles of new bitum- 
inous macadam roadways have been constructed through 
the camp to facilitate communication and the transporta- 
tion of supplies. 

Throughout the camp are seven Y. M. C. A. assembly 
halls, and social rooms, also one large auditorium for the 
convenience and recreation of the men. The Knights of 
Columbus and Salvation Army also maintain houses for 
religious and social purposes. The hospital buildings 
cover an area of 100 acres, and have a capacity sufficient 
to meet any emergency. 

J. F. RICHARDSON, 
August 22, 1917. Captain Q. M., U. S. R. 

ACREAGE OF CAMP TAYLOR. 

Acres. 

Main Camp Site 939.50 

Warehouse Terminal 36.73 

Parade Triangle (South of Southern Railway) 31 .53 

Hospital 56.40 

Civilian Group (Parade Grounds) 90 . 60 

Toatal Acreage East of Preston Street 1 , 154 . 76 

Remount Station 52.01 

Maneuver Grounds 1 , 406 . 06 



Acreage West of Preston Street 1 ,458.07 

Total Acreage 2,612.83 



65 



PROMINENT NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL 

ORGANIZATIONS THAT HAVE HELD THEIR 

MEETINGS IN LOUISVILLE. 

Elks— The only Annual Meeting of the B. P. 0. E. of the 
U. S. held in Louisville, was in May, 1891. 

Grand Army of the Republic— The first and only Grand 
Encampment of the G. A. R. held in the South, was in 
Louisville in August, 1895. 

Travellers Protective Association— Held its National Con- 
vention in Louisville in June, 1899. 

Confederate Veterans— Two Grand Reunions of the United 
Confederate Veterans of the United States were held in 
Louisville in June, 1900, and in June, 1905. 

Knights Templar— The Twenty-eighth Triennial Conclave 
of Knights Templar was held in Louisville, August 27-30, 
1901. This was the first and last Conclave held in 
Louisville. 

Knights of Pythias— The Grand Annual Encampment of 
the Knights of Pythias of the U. S. was held in Louisville, 
in August, 1904. 

Mystic Shrine— The Annual Meeting of the Imperial 
Council of the A. A. 0. N. Mystic Shrine, was held in 
Louisville, in June, 1909. This was the first and only 
time the Imperial Body held its meeting in Louisville. 

Water Works Association of America— Held their Annual 
Meeting in Louisville, June 3-8, 1912. 

Roman Catholic— The Federation of Catholic Societies of 
America, was held in Louisville in August, 1912. 

Perry (Commodore) Victory Centennial— Was held in Louis- 
viWe, July 4, 1913. 

Saengerfest — The North American Saengerfest was held 
in Louisville, in June, 1914. 

Eastern Star General Grand Chapter Triennial Meeting— 
In Louisville, October 30 to Nov. 2, 1916. 

Odd Fellows— The Annual International Meeting of the 
Supreme Lodge of Odd Fellows was held in Louisville, 
September 17-22, 1917. This is the first time the Su- 
preme Body ever held its meeting in Louisville. 

American Library Association— Week of June 21, 1917. 

World's Purity Federation- Week of November 1, 1917. 



66 



PUBLDC PARKS. 

It is claimed that no other city in the world ia more 
blessed in its public parks and playgrounds than ia Louis- 
ville. 

Cherokee Park— (In eastern part of city), 720 acres, rav- 
ishing in both natural and architectural beauty. Is 

nearly a mile square. 
Iroquois (Jacobs) Park — (South of city), contains 670 

acres. Its elegant roadways surround and ascend 

a small circular mountain. It contains every variety 

of tree that grows in this latitude. 
Lincoln Park and Public Rest Station— Adjoins Custom 

House and contains a single acre. 4th and Guthrie. 
Louisville Water Works and Bathing Pool— Frankfort Ave. 

(Crescent Hill.) 
Shawnee Park— (In west end of city), is ahnost level. 

Contains 240 acres. 
Central Park — Has shelter houses, shady benches and pool 

and playgrounds, and contains the finest stuffed bird 

museum in America. 
Other Parks are Tyler Park, Edenside and Von Borries Ave., 

15 acres; Shelby Park and Bathing Pool, Oak and 

Shelby Sts., 22 acres; Elliott Square, four acres; 

Boone Square, two acres. 

Parkways extending along the boulevard are: 
Southern Parkway— Three miles long and contains 50 acres. 
Eastern Parkway— Four miles long, containing 58 acres. 
Western Parkway— Six miles long, containing 73 acres. 
The most notable private parks are Fontaine Ferry and 
Sennings. 

CITY OF LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 

City Election 1st Tuesday after 1st Monday in Novem- 
ber, 1921. 

CITY OFFICIALS 

Mayor-HON. GEORGE WEISSINGER SMITH. Sal- 
ary $5,000. Home, City 684; Cumberland, Main 684. 

Mayor's Secretary— Salary, $2,500. 
Eugene M. Dailey, Secretary. 
Home. Citv 684; Cumberland, Main 684. 

Comptroller— Elliott Callahan. Salary, ?3,500. Home, 
7577; Cumberland, Main 46. 

City Clerk— John D. Thomas, salary S3,500. 

City Buyer— George T. Cross. Salary $2,500. Home, 
Citv 1997; Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Treasurer— Preston Tabb. Salary, $3,500. Home, 
City 3280; Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Auditor— W. P. Beecher. Salarv, $2,750. Home, City 
6052; Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Assessor— E. E. Bristow. Salary, $3,500. Home, City 
3434; Cumberland, Main 4460. 

67 



Board of Equalization of City Taxes—Home, City 3434; 

Cumbefland, Main 1620, 
Louis R. At wood. Trevar H. Whaylie. 

Bertram Strauss. 
City Attorney— Joseph Lawton. Salary, S5,000. Home, 

City 163; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
First Assistant City Attorney— William Basket. Salary, 

$3,000. Home City 163; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Second Assistant City Attorney— H. E. Tincher. Salary, 

S2,500. Home, City 163; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Tax Receiver— Ben B. Watts. Salary, .$3,500. Home, 

City 2654; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Wharf master— J. B. Steedman. Salary, $2,400. Home, 

City 3383; Cumberland, Main 2580. 
Electrical Inspector— V. F. Knadler. Salary $2,280. 
Elevator Inspector— Daniel Breitenstein. Salary $2,280. 
Inspector of Live Stock— W. F. Rogers. Salary 'Sl, 200. 
Gas and Electric Inspector- Harry M. Limbach. Salary, 

$3,000. Home, City 1711; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Inspector of Plumbing— Fred Scott. Salary, $2,280. 

Home, City 2694; Cumberland, Main 2694. 
Inspector of Weigiils and Measures— Hess Ogden. Salary, 

$1,500. 
Smoke Inspector— Col. Albert Scott. Salary, $1,800. 
Building Inspector— Emil Korell. Home, City 2694; 

Cumberland, Main 4460. Salary $3,000. 
Board of Public Works- Home, City 674; Cumberland, 

Main 4460. 

Thomas B. Crutcher, Chairman. Salary, $2,500. 

Ben J. Brumleve, $2,500. 

Ed. J. Miller, $2,500. 

William Gottschalk, Secretary. Salary, $1,500. 
Board of Public Safety— City 2393, Main 4460. 

Paul Burlingame, Chairman. Salary, $2,500. 

L. Y. Johnson. Salary, $2,500. 

Jos. Seligman. Salary, $2,500. 

Bert Newhall, Secretary. Salary, $1,650. 

Cassius Allen, Stenographer. Salary $1,200. 
Bureau of Police-Citv 862, Main 150. 

Ludlow F. Petty, Chief. Salary, $4,000. 

Harry R. Laird, Major. Salary, $2,000. 

John G. Carroll. Secretary. Salary, $1,800. 

Wm. H. DeForrester, Chief of Detectives. Salary, 
$1,800. 
Park Commissioners— City 1659, Main 1006. 

Matt H. Crawford, President, 1243 Cherokee Road. 

H. T. Larimore, 200 Bircliwood. 

Harry G. Evans, Secretary. 

Thos. Green, Treasurer. 

Dan'l M. Carrell, 2424 Ransdell. 

Cnarles Bensinger, Nord Apartments, Vice-President. 

Fred J. Drexler. 

Wm. H. Kave, 1442 3rd St. 

J. H. Steepler, Supt. 

Ex-officio Mayor George Weissinger Smith. 
Offices 601, 602 and 603 Columbia Building. 

68 



of Fire-City 1404, Main 1566. 

Arnold Neuenschwander, Chief. Salary, $4,000. 

Patrick Carroll, Assistant Ciiief. Salary, $2,000. 

J. J. Schmid, Assistant Chief. Salary, $2,000. 

Alex Bache, Assistant Chief. Salary, $2,000. 

Wm. Fisher, Assistant Chief. Salary, $2,000. 

Thos. W. Filben, Secretary. Salary, $1,800. 

Rav Parsons, Aid to Chief. 

Office 623 W.JeEferson. 
Board of Health— City 9469, Main 4460. 

Dr. T. H. Baker, Chairman. Salary, $3,000. 

Dr. Ellis Owen. Salary $2,000. 

Aubrey V. Jones. Salary, $1,800. 

Dr. Vernon Robins, City Chemist and Bacteriologist. 
Salary, $1,600. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 
S. W. Corner 8th and Chestnut. 
Board of Education— City 415, Main 2174. 

Dr. Albert B. Weaver, President. 

Alex. G. Barrett, V. President. 

Edward Gottschalk. 

Wm. Hoke Camp. 

Dr. I. N. Bloom. 
Public School Officers— City 415, Main 2174. 

Dr. Zenos E. Scott, Supt. of Public Schools. 

Henry B. Manly, Secretary and Treasurer of Board of 
Education. 

Arthur M. Rutledge, Attorney Board of Education. 

Samuel D. Jones, Business Director. 

H. Wischmeyer, Architect and Engineer. 
Architects and Engineer's Office — Home, City 7035. 
Building Department— Cumberland, Main 2174. 
Business Director— Cumberland, Main 2174; Heme, City 

8965. 
Chief Attendance Dept.— Cumberland, Main 2174. 
Secretary and Treasurer's Office — Cumberland, Main 2174; 

Home, City 8966. 
Superintendent's Office— Cumberland, Main 2174; Home 

City 415. 
Louisville Water Company— Cumberland, Main 938. 

Home, City 8542. 

H. 0. Gray, President. 

Joseph H. Durham. 

E. P. Humphrey. 
Howard B. Lee. 

Jas. B. Wilson, Chief Eng. and Supt. 
W. C. Nones, Treas. 
Chas. R. Cans, Sec. 

F. W. Hudson, Buyer. 

J. Baxter Kramer, Chief Assessor. 
Committee of Sinking Fund— 
Chesley H. Searcy, President. 
L. D. Baldauf, Secretary and Treasurer. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Joseph R. Kirwan, President. 
G. W. Schardein Edward Schoppenhorst 

James C. Wilson Louis H. Harlan 

Ernest Viel Joseph R. Kirwan 

Frank H. Johnson Zachary T. Miller 

Arthur A. Will Clay McCandless 

P. J. Gnau E. D. Morton 

Ward BOARD OF COUNCILIVIEN. 

Jacob L. Isaacs, President 

1st Albert C. Weber 7th Robert H. Lander 

1st F. W. Matthews 7th Harry A. Volz 

2nd Ed. G. Fernaw Sth J. E. Isgrigg 

2nd Wm. G. Lutz Sth Nick Denunzio 

3rd Wm. F. Clarke, Jr 9th Geo. B. Mcintosh 

3rd John H. Stocker 9th Harry Levy 

4th Wm. J. Watson 10th Leonard Slater 

4th George Feige 10th N. J. Fultz 

Sth Jacob L. Isaacs 11th Fred Ohmann 

Sth Geo. W. Schmidt 11th Chester P. Koch 

6th Geo. W. Stege 12th Ernest F. Horn 

6th C. A. Carder 12th W. R. Tischendorf 

WARD BOUNDARIES CITY OF LOUISVILLE. 

First— From Wenzel and Barret east to Old City Limits. 

Second— From ws Wenzel to es Shelby, Water to Old 
City Limits, near Burnett. 

Third — From ws Shelby to es Hancock, Water to Limits 
and all the annexed precincts in Clifton and Highlands. 

Fourth — From ws Hancock to es Preston, River to Limits. 

Fifth — From ws Preston to es First, River to Limits. 

Sixth— From ws First, to es Third, River to Limits. 

Seventh— From ws Third to es Fifth, River to Limits. 

Eighth — From ws Fifth to es Seventh, River to Limits. 

Ninth— From ws Seventh to es Tenth, River to Limits. 

Tenth— From ws Tenth to es Fourteenth, River to Limits. 

Eleventh— From ws Fourteenth to es Twenty-first, River 
to Limits. 

Twelfth— From ws Twenty-first to Limits. 

Water Works System— 

A total pumping capacity at the river, pe day of 

twenty-four hours, of 72,000.000 gals. 
A reservoir capacity at Crescent Hill, of 137.000,000 

gals. 
A filtration capacity, per day of twenty-four hours, 

of 75,000,000 gals. 
A re-pumping capacity at Crescent Hill, per day of 

twenty-four hours, of 72,000,000. 
Miles of mains, 403,734. 
Number of service connections, 44,448. 
Total value of the Water Company's plant is about 

$10,000,000. 
Main office at 435 South Third Street, 

70 



CITY DEPARTMENTS 

Offices called by Main 4460 are connected with Private 
Branch Exchange. 
Auditor's Office— City Hall Annex. Cumberland, Main 

4460. Home, City 9469. 
Bailiff's Office— City Hall Annex. Cumberland, Main 

4460. 
Board of Equalization— Home, City 3434. Cumberland, 

Main 9469. 
Board of Public Safety— City Hall. Heme, City 9469; 

Cumberland, Main 4460. Night No. 4462. 
Board of Public Works— Citv Hall. Home, City 9469; 

Cumberland, Main 4460. Night No. 4461. 
Bond Recorder— City Hall. Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Building Inspector— City Hall. Home, City 9469; Cum- 
berland, Main 4460. 
Buyer's Office— Citv Hall. Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Home, City 9469. 
Chief of Detectives— Main 167. 
Chief of Fire Department— Jefferson between Sixth and 

Seventh Streets. Heme, City 1404. Cumberland, 

Main 1180. 
Chief of Police— City Hall. City 862. Cumberland, Main 

862. 
City Assessor— City Hall Annex. Home, City 3434. Cum- 
berland, Main 4460. 
City Attorney's Office — City Hall. Cumberland, Main 

4460; Home City 0469. 
City Hall- Cumberland, Main 4460. Home, City 9469. 
City Hospital— 323 E. Chestnut. Cumberland, Main 189. 

Home, City 188. 
Clerk Board of Aldermen— City Hall. Cumberland, Main 

4460. City 9469. 
Clerk Board of Councilmen— City Hall. Cumberland, 

Main 4460. City 9469. 
Clerks of the General Council— City Hall. Cumberland, 

Main 4460. City 9469. 
Clerk of the Police Court— City Hall Annex. Cumberland, 

Main 4460. City 9469. 
Commissioner of Sinking Fund— City Hall Annex. Heme 

City 660. Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Comptroller's Office— City Hall Annex. Home, City 9469; 

Ciunberland, Main 4460. 
Engineering Department; Chief Engineer— Room 214 City 

Hall. Home, City 9469; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Engineering Department; Assistant Engineers— Rocm 216 

City Hall. Home, City 9469; Cumberland, Main 4460. 
Engineering Department; Draughting Room— Room 216 

City Hall. Home, City 9469. Cumberland, Main 

4460. 
Engineering Department; Supt. Construction and Repairs- 
City Hall. Home, City 9469. Cumberland, Main 

4460. 

71 



Engineering Department; Supt. Sewers and Drains— Room 

304 City Hall. Home, City 9469. Cumberland, Main 
4460. 

Engine Room— City Hall Annex. Home, City 9469. Cum- 
berland, Main 4460. 

Eruptive Hospital— Shively, Ky. Cumberland, South 
1811W. Home, Shawnee 184. 

Gas Inspector— City Hall Annex. Home, City 9469; 
Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Health Office— City Hall. Home, City 9469; Cumber- 
land, Main 4460. 

Home for Aged and Infirm— Shively, Ky. Home, Shawnee 
183. Cumberland, South 1811-J. 

Hospital— 323 E. Chestnut. Home, City 188; Cumber- 
land, Main 188, 189. 

Humane Society, City Hall— Home, City 9469. 

Inspector of Weights and Measures— City Hall. Cumber- 
land, Main 4460; Home, City 9469. 

Employment Bureau, City Hall— Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Information Bureau, City Hall— Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Live Stocl< Inspector— 1057 E. Main. Home, City 678. 

Mayor's Office— City Hall. Home, City 684; Cumberland, 
Main 684. Also Main 4460, City 9469. 

Military Police — Armory. Cumberland, Main 1054. 

Plumbing I nspector— City Hall. Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Pound; Eastern District — St. Catherine between Jackson & 
Hancock. Home, City 3643. 

Pound ; Western District— Sixteenth and Pirtle Sts. Home, 
City 3585. 

Pumps and Wells Department— Green between Twelfth & 
Thirteenth Streets. Home, City 4124. 

Reporter's Room, City Hall— Home, City 1387. Cumber- 
land, Main 1387. 

Sinking Fund— City Hall Annex. City 660; Cumberland, 
Main 660. 

Street Cleaning Department— City Hall. City 9469; 
Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Street Cleaning Department— Jefferson between Eighth and 
Ninth Streets. Cumberland, Main 4460. • 

Street Repair Yards— Magazine near Twentieth St. Home, 
Shawnee 1074. 

Street Repair Yards— Logan south of Breckenridge. Home, 
City 2380. 

Supt. of Portland Cemetery— 3916 High Street. Home, 
Shawnee 1861. 

Supt. of Public Wharves— Third and River. City 3383; 
Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Tax Receiver's Office— City Hall Annex. Home, City 
9469; Cumberland, Main 4460. 

Treasurer's Office— City Hall Annex. City 9469. Cum- 
berland, Main 4460. 
Work House— Payne and Spring Streets. Home, City 
1584; Cumberland, East 588. 



72 



DAILY PAPERS 

Courier-Journal— (Morning) S.W. Comer Third and Green 

Home City 276; Cumberland Main 285. 
Evening Post— 317 W. Walnut Street. Cumberland Main 

544; Home City 544. 
Herald— (Morning) Herald Bldg. 222-24 W. Walnut St. 

Home City 65; Cumberland Main 65. 
Louisville Anzeiger Co.— (Morning; German) 321 W. Green 

Street. Home City 623; Cumberland Main 623. 
Times— S. W. Corner Third and Green Streeti 

Home City 121. 

$1,000,000. INDUSTRIAL FUND. 
(For Factories.) 

Frank B. Ayers, General Manager. 
Directors— Lewis R. Atwood, John W. Barr, Jr., W. E. 
Caldwell, Victor H. Engelhard, William Heyburn, Robert 
E. Hughes, Charles F. Huhlein, Percy H. Johnston, Fred 
Levy, Donald McDonald, Caldwell Norton, CM. Phillips, 
Fred M. Sackett, Thomas Floyd Smith, Embry L. Swear- 
ingen. 

LOUISVILLE PUBLICITY LEAGUE. 

Office 510 Republic Bldg., Louisville. 
Brinton B. Davis, President. 
Louis Seelbach, Vice-President. 
Richard Bean, Treasurer. 
George E. Allen, Secretary and Managing Director. 

LOUISVILLE AUDITORIUIVl (One Million 
Dollar) COMMISSION. 

Judge R. W. Bingham, Chairman. 

George W. Norton. 

C. S. Williams. 

Frederick M. Sacket. 

Thomas Floyd Smith. 

Mrs. A. T. Hert. 

Mrs. Cale Young Rice. 

LOUISVILLE MEMORIAL COMMISSION. 

Thomas Floyd Smith. 
Robert Worth Bingham. 
Frederick M. Sacket. 
P. J. Hanlan. 
Marion E. Taylor. 
George C. Burton. 
Mrs. A. T. Hert. 



73 





1 


Siiii^Siiiiis 








^ 


O00C0l000-<*0>OCD«3CDOC^ 




£ 




i 

00 *" 




g .5 

Ul = 


i 

1^ 


lOiO'— IOO«00005C350CD'— 'COCO 


Z 3 


?5?§§5?5^?^s^^^^^;s 


1 1 

z «< 


^ 

5 


OC5 0^>OOOC>7C050Ci.-iiOOO 


d •- 
< i 


05r-050>0'--*ioascot-to<M 


1} 

1 

2 


H 


SsiliiSSIiiss 


0>t^0000OC-llC-^C='-'OC5C0 


i 


ociioocoocsoocor^ior^cc 




2ss=;^^^?5SJ^j^ss 




1 

>- 
















i 




























< 























74 



POLICE STATIONS 

Central Police Station— City Hall. Home, City 150; Cum. 

Main 149 and 150 
First District— Shelby between Market and Jefferson Sts. 

Home, City 130; Cumberland, Main 149 and 150. 
Fourth District— Twenty-eighth and Main. Home, City 

150; Cumberlaad. Main 149 and 150. 
Fifth District— Clay and St. Catherine Streets. Home, City 

150; Cumberland, Main 149 and 150. 
Sixth District— Magnolia near Sixth Street. Home, City 

150; Cumberland, Mam 149 and 150. 
Seventh District— N. W. Corner Eighteenth and Garland 

Avenue. Home, City 150; Cumberland, Main 149 

and 150. 

CITY HOSPITAL 

Floyd to Preston, Chestnut to Madison— Home, City 188; 
Cumberland, Main 188 and 189. 



FIRE DEPARTiVIENT 

Fire Alarm Tower— Jefferson between Sixth and Seventh 

Streets, Home, City 10; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Chief of Fire Department — Jefferson between Sixth and 

Seventh Streets. Home, City 1404; Cumberland, Main 

1180. 
Hook and Ladder No. 1. — Jefferson between Sixth and 

Seventh Streets. Home, City 3621; Cumberland, 

Mam 1566, 
Hook and Ladder No. 2. — Hancock between Jefferson and 

Market Streets. Home, City 3622; Cumberland, Maio 

1566. 
Hook and Ladder No. 3.— Preston and Merritt Streets. 

Home, City 3622; Cumberland. Main 1566. 
Hook and Ladder No. 4.— Twenty-third and Jefferson Sts. 

Home, City 3623; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Hook and Ladder No. 5.— Twentieth and Garland Avenue. 

Home, City 3,~00; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Hook and Ladder No. 6.— Pope and Frankfort Avenue. 

Home. City 3703; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Hook and Ladder No. 7.— Bardstown Road and Windsor 

Place. Home, City 3341; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 1,— Jefferson near Jackson Street. 

Home, City 3611; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 2. — Jefferson between Sixth and Seventh 

Streets. Home, City 3621; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 3.— Main above Shelby Street. Home, 

City 3622; Cumberland, Main 1566. 



75 



Engine House No. 4.— Main near Sixteenth Street. Home, 

City 3623; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 5.— Liberty near First Street. Some 

City 3700; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 6.— Portland Avenue between Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth Streets. Home, City 3703; 

Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 7.— Sixth between York and Breckin- 
ridge Streets. Home, City 3730; Cumberland Main, 

1566. 
Engine House No. 8.— Thirteenth near Maple Street, 

Home, City 3740; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 9. — Jackson and Roselane Sts. Home, 

City 3818; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 1 0.— Washington near Webster Street. 

Home, City 3822; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 11. — Rogers near Baxter Avenue. Home, 

City 3850; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 12. — Twentieth and Madison Streets. 

Home, City 3870; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 13.— Rudd between Thirty-fourth and 

Thirty-fifth Streets. Home, City 3905; Cumberland, 

Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 14.— Logan near Kentucky Street. 

Home, City 3908; Cumberland, Main 1566. 

House No. 15.— Preston near Merritt St. Home-,, 

City 3058; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 1 6.— Sixth near Hill Street. Home, City 

3923; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine IHouse No. 17.— Twentieth and Garland Avenue-- 

Home, City 3040; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 18.— Fourth and K Street. Home, CsJSy 

3523; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 19.— Twenty-eighth between Bismark 

and Virginia Avenues. Home^ City 3520; Cumber- 
land, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 20,— Bardstow^n Road and Maryland. 

Home, City 3555; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 21. — Franck and Frankfort Avenues. 

Home, City 5054; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Engine House No. 22.— Thirty-seventh and Broadway, 

Home, City 3731; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
Water Tower No. 1.— Jefferson between Sixth and Seventh 

Streets. Home, City 3621; Cumberland, Main 156ft. 
Repair Shop-;-Congres8 between Sixth and Seventh Stieeia. 

Home, City 3493; Cumberland, Main 1566. 
IVIaster Mechanic— 2326 W. Jefferson Street. Home, 

Shawnee 1409; Cumberland, Main 156& 



76 



JEFFERSON COUNTY OFFICERS. 
Clerk Circuit Court— Frank Dugan, Office Court House. 

City (514. 
County Commissioners— James F. Grinstead, John B. 

Ba&kin, Tliil A. Hunt. City 984. 
Commissioner Circuit Court— Eustace L. Williams, Office 

Court House. City 4222. 
Commonwealth Attorney— Jos. M. Huffaker, Office Court 

House. Ciiv2301. 
County Armory— North side Walnut E. of 6th. Robt. 

Monroe, Armorer. City 196. 
County Assessor— Thomas M. Wintersmith, Office Court 

House. City 1143. 
County Attorney— J. Matt Chilton, Office Court House. 

Citv 764. 
County Clerk— Fred 0. Nuetzel; W. G. Gilligan, Chief Dep- 
uty. Office Court House. City 4354. 
County Coroner— Dr. Rov L. Carter, Office Court House. 
County Health Officer, Office Court House. City 214. 
County Indexer — Louis Vissman, Office Court House. 
County Jail— Sixth and Liberty; J. H. Barr, jailer. City 

1183. 
County School Superintendent— Orville J. Stivers, Office 

Court House. 
County Sheriff— W. E. Ross, Office Court House. H. C. 

McCorkhill, Chief Deputy. City 977. 
County Surveyor— Merritt Drane, Office Court House. 

City 084. 
County Treasurer— Thos. D. Clines, Office Court House. 

Citv 245. 

COURTS. 
County Court of Jefferson County— Probate Court in con- 
tinuous session. Wm. Krieger, Judge. City 605. 
Quarterly Court— Continuous session. Wm. Krieger, Judge; 

J. W. Spanyer, Clerk. 
Court of Appeals— Frankfort— Is held on the first Monday 

in January; second Monday in April, and third Monday 

in September. 
Louisville Police Court— City Hall. 

A. T. Burgevin, Judge. Salary $3,500. 

Robert H. Lucas, Prosecuting Attorney. Salary, 
$3,500. 
Juvenile Court— 

Wm. Krieger, Judge. 

Mrs. Emma Hegan, Chief Probation Officer. 
COURT HOUSE AND COUNTY OFFICES. 
Assessor's Office— Court House. Cumberland, Main 4340. 
Circuit Clerk's Office— Court House. Cumberland, Main 

4349. 
Commissioner's Office — Court House. Cumberland, Main 

4355. 
Coroner's Office — Court House. Cumberland, Main 4354. 
County Clerk's Office— Court House. Cumberland, Main 

4361. 
County Attorney — Cumberland, Main 4357. 
Commonwealth Attorney — Cumberland, Main 4343. 

77 



Ccunty Fcor Reuse— CuiBterlarid, Jeff erscntcwn 18-J. 
Ccunty Health Cfficc- Court House. Heme, City 214; 
Cumberland, Main 4351. 

Jailer's Office— Center and Liberty Streets. Cumberland, 
Main 1183; Home City 1183. 

Sheriff's Office— Court House. Home, City 977; Cum- 
berland, Main 4353. 

County I ndexer— Cumberland, Main 4356. 

County School Superintendent— Cumberland, Main 4342. 

County Surveyor— Cumberland, Main 4355. 

Juvenile Court— Cumberland, Main 4352. 

Jefferson Circuit Court— Criminal Division- 
Harry W. Robinson, Judge. Salary $5,000. 
Joseph M. Huffaker, Commonwealth Attorney. 
Loraine Mix, Assistant Commonwealth Attorney. 

Common Pleas Branch— First Division— W. H. Field, 
Judge. Salary, $5,000. City 594. 

Common Pleas Branch— Second Division— Thos. R. 
Gordon, Judge. Salary $5,000. Cumberland, Main 
4.347. 

Common Pleas Branch— Third Division— Walter P. Lin- 
coln, Judge. Salary $5,000. Cumberland Main 4344. 

Common Pleas Branch— Fourth Division— Hon. C. T. Ray, 
Judge. Salary $5,000. Ciunberland, Main 4348. 

Chancery Branch— First Division— Arthur M. Wallace, 
Judge. Salary, $5,000. Cumberland, Main 4345. 

Chancery Branch— Second Division- 
Samuel B. Kirby, Judge. Salary $5,000. Cumber- 
land Main 4346. 
Frank Dugan, Clerk. 
Eustace L. Williams, Commissioner. 
W. E. Ross, Sheriff. 
James O'Connor, Receiver. ' 

BANKS AND TPUST COMPANIES. 

Citizens Union National Bank— 5th and Jefferson, Jeff. D, 

Stewart, Pres.; Jos. M. Zehner, Cashier. Home, 

City 162; Cumberland, Main 133. 
First National Bank— Fifth and Court Place, Embry L. 

Swearingen, Pres.; H. L. Rose, Vice Pres. and Cashier. 

Home, City 8174, Cumberland, Main 1043. 
Federal Land Bank of Louisville, The— 3rd and Broadway 

Waiter Howell, Pres.; J. P. Brenan, Vice-pres.; James 

B. Davis, Secretary; John T. Moore, Treasurer; H. A. 

Sommers, Director; Cumberland. South 2094. 
Federal Reserve Branch Bank— Columbia Bldg., Foiu-th 

and Main, Wilham P. Kincheloe, Manager; John T. 

Moore, Cashier; Cumberland, Main 796. Home, City 

638. 
Citizens Union (4th Street Bank)— J. C. Cardwell, Pres.; 

Isham Bridges, Vice-Pres. 
Liberty Insurance Bank— 207-209 W. Market, A. P. Winkler 

Pres.; H. C. Walbeck, Chairman of the Board: Frank 

R. Merhoff, Vice-Pres.; E. F. Kohnhorst, Cashier; 

Home, City 243; Cumberland, Main 243. 

78 



Security Bank— 401 E. Market. Charles H. Bohmer, 
Pres.; Charles Gutig, Cashier. Home, City 159; 
Cumberland, Main 159. 

Kentucky Title Savings Bank & Trust Co.— Kentucky Title 
Bldg., 216 S. Fifth. E. L. Swearingen, Pres.; R. W. 
Delph, Cashier. Home, City 1043. Cumberland, Main 
1043. 

Lincoln Savings Bank and Trust Co.— Market and Fourth. 
V. J. Buliitt. Pres.; P. L. Atherton, Vice-Pres. Home, 
City 8608; Cumberland, Main 1143. 

Louisville Clearing House Association— Isham Bridges, 
Mgr.; Columbia Bldg. 

Louisville National Banking Co.— Fifth and Market. John 
H. Leathers, Pres.; Benj. C. Weaver, Jr., Cashier; 
Home, City 590; Cumberland, Main 590. 

National Bank of Kentucky— Fifth and Main. James B. 
Brown, Pres.; Oscar Fenley, Chairman Board of Di- 
rectors; Earl S. Gwinn, Vice-pres.; C. F. Jones, Cashier; 
Home, City 215; Cumberland, Main 127. 

South Louisville Savings and Deposit Bank— Fourth and 
Central. L. S. Leopold, Pres.; Pope McAdams, Cash- 
ier. Home, City 218; Cumberland, South 1571. 

Stock Yards Bank— Main and Johnson. Charles H. 
Wulkop, Pres.; Carl A. Yann, Cashier. Home, City 
64; Cumberland, Main 64. 

Trust Companies. 

Fidelity and Columbia Trust Co.— Columbia Bldg. L. W. 

Botts, Pres. Home, City 607; Cumberland, Main 605. 
Louisville Trust Co.— Fifth and Market. John Stites, Pres. 

Home, City 911; Main 874. 
United States Trust Co.— Fifth and Main. Bethel B. 

Veecb, Pres. Home, City 927; Cumberland, Main 1077. 
Louisville Stock Exchange— Marvin H. Lewis, Pres.; 

Ciunberlaud, Main 505. 
Kentucky Title Co.— 216 S. Fifth. Embry L. Swearingen, 

Pres.; C. L. A. Johnson, Treasurer. 

FEDERAL LAND BANK. 

The Federal Land Bank of Louisville, District No. 4, 
operates under what is known as "The Farm Loan Act" 
to advance rural credits, stimulate agriculture and improve 
farming conditions. 

The Farmer can borrow from the Federal Land Bank 
of Louisville, loans from $100.00 to $10,000.00 for a period 
of from five to forty years, at 5% per annum, payable 
on the amortization plan. These liberal terms are made 
possible by legislation, the most favorable of its kind ever 
enacted for the benefit of the farming classes. 

Loans are made through channels of National Farm 
Loan Associations, organized with ten or more farmers, 
asking for an aggregate of not less than $20,000.00 in loans. 

Any farmer interested can receive further information 
by addressing the Federal Land Bank of Louisville. 

79 



The Executive Committee of the Federal Land Bank 
of Louisville consists of three active officers, Walter Howell, 
president, formerly a banker of Union City, Tenn.; James 
B. Davis, secretary, formerly a banker of Brazil, Ind., and 
L. B. Clore, Treasurer, widely known scientific farmer of 
Franklin, Ind. These three men together with H. A. Som- 
mers, publisher of the Elizabethtown News, Elizabethtown, 
Ky., and A. P. Sandles, secretary of the Macadam Road 
Association, of Ottawa, Ohio, constitute the board of 
directors. 

The capital stock of the bank at the present time is 
$1,250,000. Of this amount $750,000 is owned by the 
United States government, which provided the original 
capital for the twelve regional banks under the Federal 
Farm T oan Act. 

Bank Clearings, Louisville. 

1908 $579 863,327.53 

1909 653,849,219.36 

1910 675,417,928.58 

1911 674 533,256.61 

1912 723,894,243.08 

1913 715,731,756.00 

1914 667,947,515.00 

1915 742,390,281.00 

1916 942,133,137.00 

1917 1,003,000,000.00 

1918 1,159,922,941.00 

1919 928,955,863.00 

Total Bank Transactions in the Ciiy. 

1918 $4,202,555,000.00 

1919 3,716,379,941.00 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 
Louisville City Hospital Training School for Nurses— Chest- 
nut, east of Floyd. 
Jefferson School of Law— Ofi^ce of Sec, 901 Inter-Southern 
Life Building. Lecture rooms, Fifth and Main. Home, 
City 1285. 
Louisville Law School— 119 W. Broadway. 
Louisville College of Dentistry— 129 E. Broadway. Home, 

City 3008. 
Louisville Co'lege of Pharmacy— 119 W Broadway. 

Home, City 805. 
University of Louisville (Medical Department) — 101 W. 

Chestnut. Home, City 6210. 
University of Louisville (Academic Department)— 119 W. 

Broadway. Home, City 8335. 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary— 416 W Broadway. 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky— 109 E. 

Broadway. 
State University (Colored)— 722 W. Kentucky St. 
Y. M. C. A.— Third and Broadway. Home, ( ity 719. 
Y. M. H. A.— Second and Jacob. Home. City 2179. 
Y. W. C. A.— Second and Broadway. Home, City 3999; 
Cumb. South 1540. 

80 



APARTMENT HOUSES. 

(See also Public Halls, Blocks and Buildings) 
Aery, The— 1809 S. First. 
Alberta, The— 206 W. Walnut. 
Alberta, The— 212 W. Oak. 
Albion Apartments — 1317 S. Fourth. 
Alcazar, The— 210 W. Chestnut. 
Alexander, The— 1629 S. Third. 
Algeria, The— 1801 S. First. 
Aloha Apartments— 424 Kensington Court. 
Angle Apartments— 2000 S. Third. 
Ansonia Apartments— 2615-2621 Virginia Ave. 
Apollo Apartments— 420 W. Walnut. 
Appleton Apartments — 1224 Cherokee Road. 
Aragon Apartments — 1508 S. First. 
Armin, The— 657 S. Third. 
Ashton, The— 2021-2023 S. Fourth. 
Attilla Apartments— 101-107 W. Hill. 
Aud Apartments— 120 W. Brandeis Ave. 
Austral Apartments— 1601-1603 S. Fourth. 
Avilla Apartments— 2614-2628 Virginia Ave. 
Beechwood, The— 1648 Beechwood Ave. 
Belgravia Apartments— 1479 S. Fourth. 
Bellnor Apartments— 1038 S. Third. 
Belvedere Apartments— 1502-1506 S. Fourth. 
Belvoir Apartments— 2229 Cherokee Parkway. 
Besten Apartments— 2014-2016 Cherokee Parkway. 
Beville, The— 214 E. Ormsby Ave. 
Bomar Apartments— 720 W. Chestnut. 
Breckinridge, The— 839-841 S. Second. 
Brentwood Apartments — 1128 S. First. 
Brighton Apartments— 432 Kensington Court. 
Brockman Apartments— 723 S. First. 
Buerk Apartments— 973 S. Brook. 
Button, The— 322-326 Laurel Court. 
Carolina, The— 1623-1631 S. Second. 
Carroll, The— 1124 S. First. 
Cartledge, The— 831 S. Third. 
Central Flats— 965-971 S. Third. 
Central, The— 307 W. Chestnut. 
Chalfonte Flats— 430 W. Hill. 
Charlotte Apartments— 300-304 Baxter Ave. 
Charmant Apartments— 1001-1003 S. Second. 
Chelsea, The— 214 W. Chestnut. 
Cherokee Apartments— 2004-2006 Cherokee Parkway. 
Chesterfield, The— 423-429 W. Broadway. 
Clare, The— 433 S. Second. 
Clifford, The— 917 S. Fourth. 
Coke, J. Guthrie Apartments— 405-415 W. Chestnut a 
566 S. Fourth. 
Coker's Apartments— 726-728 W. Chestnut. 
Colonial Apartments— 431 Kensington Coiu-t. 
Conrad Flats— 704 S. Twelfth. 
Cortlandt, The— 934-948 S. Fourth. 
Cynthia, The— 1914-1918 Frankfort Ave. 

81 



De Sopo Apartments— 205 S. Eighth. 

Dorothea, The— 1729 S. First. 

Dunker, The— 3921-3927 Grand Boulevard. 

Ou Nord, The— 629 S. Third. 

Earlington Apartments— 1128 Cherokee Road. 

Elaine Apartments— 1504 S. First. 

El Monte Apartments— 114 W. Hill. 

Elsie Apartments— 1504 S. First. 

Enid Apartments— 1727 S. First. 

Fischer Apartments— 202 E. St. Catherine. 

Florence, The— 1500 S. First. 

Florence, The— 720 S. Fifth. 

Fountaine Apartments— 1441 S. Fourth. 

Gertrude, The— 215-217 W. Lee. 

Gheens Apartments— 1480-1484 S. Third and 315 W. Hill. 

Goddard Apartments— 1505 Rosewood Ave. 

Grand View Apartments and Annex— 172-173 N. Keats 
Ave. 
Hamilton, The— 2125-2127 S. First. 
Harrison, The— 831 S. Second. 
Helena, The— 1717 S. First. 
Herndon Apartments— 1039 Baxter Ave. 
Hertel Apartments— 509 N. Twenty-sixth. 
Hiawatha, The— 1048 Cherokee Road. 
Highland Apartments— 1525 Highland Ave. 
Hilda, The— 513 S. Second. 
Holloway Apartments— 623 S. Fourth. 
Holmes, The— 547 S. Eighth. 
Holmhurst Apartments— 409 Kensington Court. 
Homestead Apartments— 331 E. Gray. 
Ideal Apartments— 1625 S. First. 
Ignatius Apartments— 1301 DeBarr. 
Inez Apartments— 1231 Bardstown Road. 
Ingleside Apartments— 115-121 E. Gray. 
Jacob Apartments— 105-107 Caldwell. 
Jacob Apartments Annex— 111-115 Caldwell. 
Josephine Apartments— 119 W. Burnett. 
Kampfmueller, The— 630 W. Broadway. 
Kensington, The— 1521 S. Fourth. 
Kentucky, The— 970 S. First. 
Kia Ora Apartments— 1605 S. Third. 
Lawrence Apartments— 1615 S. Third. 

Leeds Apartments— 2031-2033 S. Second and 127 W. 
Barbee Ave. 
Leiand, The— 643 S. Third. 
Lenox, The— 1703 S. First and 104 E. Lee. 
Leslie Apartments, The— 506 S. Third. 
Library Apartments— 1155 S. Twenty-eighth. 
Loraine Apartments— 700 W. Chestnut. 
Louise, The— 125 W. Lee. 
Macauiey's Apartments— 325-327 W. Walnut. 
Magnolia Apartments— 100 E. Magnolia Ave. 
Majestic, The— 414 W. St. Catherine. 
Mantle Apartments— 105 E. Oak. 

82 



Marguerite, The— 812 S. Third. 

Marietta Apartments— 126-128 \V. Kentucky. 

Marion, The— 703 W. Chestnut. 

Mildred, The— now. Hill. 

Milton, The— 1415 St. James Court. 

Monon, The— 544 S. Second. 

Morgan, The— 741 S. Second. 

Navarre Apartments — 1524 S. Second. 

Nettieton Fiats— 100-102 W. Broadway. 

Nord Apartments— 1524 S. Fourth. 

Norma Apartments— 1619 S. First. 

Oaker, The— 1204 S. Second. 

Ormsby, The— 125-131 E. Ormsby Ave. 

Ormsby, The— 208-210 W. Ormsby Ave. 

Osborne, The— 146-148 E. Broadway. 

Osborne Annex, The— 714-716 S. Brook. 

Owens-Hill Apartments— 1324-1330 S. Sixth. 

Oxford Apartments — 1427 S. Second. 

Parfitt, The— 1478 St. James Court. 

Park Apartments— 1345 S. Fourth. 

Parkside Apartments— 2015 Bonnycastle Ave. 

Parkview Apartments— 2017-2023 Cherokee Parkway and 
1330-1334 Cherokee Road. 

Parson's Apartments— Parson Court N. E. Cor. Bonny- 
castle Ave. 

Pasadena Apartments— 102 Crescent Court. 

Peerless Apartments— 811-813 S. Third. 

Pennington Apartments— 2108-2114 Cherokee Parkway. 

Petrle, The— 1058 Cherokee Road. 

Pirtle Flats— 817 S. Second. 

Piazza Apartments— 1481-1483 St. James Court. 

Pope Building— Third, S. E. Cor. Walnut. 

Puritan, The— 1244 S. Fourth. 

Reedmer Apartments— 411 Kensington Court. 

Regina Apartments— 301 E. College and 761-767 S. Floyd. 

Reutlinger Flats— 123 S. Third. 

Ritcher, The— 1202 S. Fourth. 

Rossmore, The— 658 S. Fourth. 

Rudina, The— 2000 Mmray Ave. 

St. Charles Place— 523-531 S. Secodd. 

St. Charles Place Annex— 535-537 S. Second. 

St. Ives Apartments— 206 W. Oak and 1200 S. Second. 

St. James Apartments— 1433 St. James Court. 

Sans Souci Apartments— 1453 S. Third and 216-226 W. 
Burnett Ave. 

Santanne, The— 909-911 S. First. 

Savoy, The— 922 S. Sixth. 

Security Building— 639 S. Second. 

Shady Side Apartments— 127-129 E. Gray. 

Shawnee Apartments— 3714-3716 W. Broadway. 

Speed, The— 107 W. Kentucky. 

Spindle Apartments— 1111 S. Fourth. 

Stella, The— 119 W. Lee. 

Stratford Apartments— 408 Kensington Court. 

Sutton Apartments— 412 Kensington Court. 

Tafel Apartments— 505 E. Chestnut. 



Thelma Apartments— 2121-2123 S. First. 

Thierman Apartments — 416-420 W. Breckinridge. 

Thomas Apartments— 1762 Frankfort Ave. 

Vernon, The — 185 Veruon Ave. 

Vertrees Apartmenta— 1006 Cherokee Road. 

Virginia Apartments— 1629-1631 S. First. 

Virginia Flats— 458-460 E. Wampum. 

Virginia, The— 118 W. St. Catherine. 

Wagner, The— 1131-1135 S. Sixth. 

Walden Place— Second, N. W. Cor. Bloom Ave. 

Walker, The— 310K W. Chestnut. 

Weisslnger-Gaulbert Apartments— Broadway, S. W. Cor. 
Third. 

Weisslnger-Gaulbert Annex- 316 W. Broadway and 718 
S. Third. 

Weisslnger-Gaulbert Third Ave. Annex— Third, S. E. Cor. 
Broadway. 

Wellington Apartments— 143-145 N. Keats Ave. 

Westminster Apartments— 1809 S. Third. 

Windsor Apartments— 939-945 S. Brook. 

WInton, The— 518 S. Sixth. 

Wyoming Apartments — 1530 S. Second. 



AMUSEMENT AND BASEBALL PARKS. 

Eclipse Baseball Park — Seventh and Kentucky. 
Fontaine Ferry Park — Western Parkway, south of Market. 
Senning's Park— End of Park via Third car Une. 
Phoenix Hill Park— 512 Baxter Avenue. 
Riveryiew Park — Greenwood Avenue and River. 
Magnolia Garden— Third and Avery. 



RACE TRACKS. 

Douglas Park— Take Fourth street car via Third. 
Churchill Downs— Take Fourth street car via Seventh. 



CEMETERIES.* 

Adath Israel Cemetery— West side Preston, South of K. 

B'nal Jacob Cemetery — North side Locust Lane, West 
of Preston. 

Brith Sholom Cemetery — West side of Preston, South of 
K. 

Cave Hill Cemetery Co.— Baxter Avenue, head of Broad- 
way. 

Eastern Cemetery— 641 Baxter Avenue. 

Evergreen Cemetery— Preston Street Road, beyond 



Greenwood Colored Cemetery — Greenwood Avenue, S. 
W. Cor. Fortieth. 

Hebrew Cemetery— 318-342 Woodbine. 

Louisville Cemetery (Colored) — North side Goss Ave., 
East of Eastern Parkway. 

84 



Old Catholic Cemetery— South side of Jefferson, between 
Fifteenth and Sixteenth. 

Portland Cemetery— 3524 Pflanz Avenue. 

St. John's (R. C.) Cemetery— Twenty-sixth, N. W. Cor. 
Duncan. 

St. Louis (R. C.) Cemetery— East Side Barret Ave., 
South of Rufer Ave. 

St. Michael's German (R. C.) Cemetery— East side 
Texas, North of Charles. 

St. Stephen's Cemetery— West side Preston. 

United States National Cemetery— 637 Baxter Avenue. 

Western Cemetery— Jefferson, between Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth. 

*Automobiles are allowed to enter Cemeteries. 



CHURCKES. 

Louisville is notably a city of churches, their aggregate 
value being more than $8,000,000. Of Protestant white 
churches in the city, the list is as follows: Southern Bap- 
tists, 32; Methodist Episcopal, 7; Methodist, South, 18; 
Presbyterian, U. S.. 13; Presbyterian, U. S. A., 7; Disciples, 
12; Protestant Episcopal, 14; Lutheran, 8; German Evan- 
gelical, 10, Evangelical Association, 2; Reformed Pres- 
byterian 5: Associate Reform. 1. 

There are also 36 CathoUc churches, 66 Colored churches, 
and a number of miscellaneous religious cults. 

INFIRMARIES, HOSPITALS, ETC. 

Beechhurst Sanitarium— Dr. M. H. Yeaman, Superintend- 
ent, Transit nr. Dudley Street. Home, Highland 
910; Cumberland, East 257. 

Gardner's Sanatorium, Dr.— 1412 South Sixth St. Home 
City 5996; Cumberland, South 480. 

Bush Sanatorium, The— 836 South Fourth St. Home, 
City 7418; Cumberland, South 1847-A. 

Central State Hospital— Lakeland. Home, City 4609; Cum- 
berland, Main 4609. 

Children's Free Hospital— 232 E. Chestnut St. Home. 
City 9194; Cumberland, Main 2192. 

Christian Church Widows and Orphans Home— 225 East 
College Street. Cumberland, South 1164-A. 

Church Home and Infirmary — 1508 Morton Ave. Cum- 
berland, East 36. 

Citizens National Hospital— 106 W. Green Street. Home. 
City 1419. 

City Hospital— Preston and Chestnut Streets. Home, City 
188; Cumberland, Main 188. 

85 



Commissioners of Hospitals — 404 E. Chestnut St. Home, 

City 1377. 
Cook Benevolent Institution— Seventh and Kentucky Sts. 

Cumberland, South 219. 
Deaconess Hospital— 529 S. Eighth St. Home, City 3638; 

Cumberland, Main 2420. 
Eruptive Hospital— Salt River Road. Home, Shawnee 184. 
Home for Aged and Infirm— Salt River Road. Home, 

Shawnee 183. 
Home of the Friendless— 512-14 W. Kentucky St. Cum- 

berland. South 1342. 
Home of the Innocents— 108 W. Broadway. Cumberland. 

South 526. 
Jewish Hospital Ass'n— Floyd and Kentucky Sts. Home. 

City 7489: Cumberland, South 1036. 

Kentucky Children's Home— 1080 Baxter Ave. Cumber- 
land, East 880-Y. 
Kentucky Children's Home Society— 1086 Baxter Avenue. 

Cumberland, East 880-M. 

Kentucky Institute for the Blind— 1867 Frankfort Avenue. 

Cumberland, East 707. 

Kings Daughters' Home for Incurables— Stevens and Mor- 
ris. Cumberland, East 136. 

Lakeland Asylum— Lakeland, Ky. Home, City 4609. 

Louisville Baptist Orphans' Home— First and St. Cather- 
ine. Cumberland. South 1223. 

Louisville City Hospital— Floyd to Preston, Chestnut to 
Madison. Home, City 188; Cumberland, Main 188. 

Marine Hospital — Twenty-third and High Streets. Home, 
Shawnee 932. 

Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home— Second between 
Bloom and Avery. Cumberland. South 32-A. 

Methodist Episcopal Church South, Widows' and Orphans' 
Home— 812 Fifth Street. Cumberland, South 397. 

Neal Institute for Alcoholism- Dr. E. P Adams, Supt., 422 
Bank Street, New Albany. Home. 888. 

Norton Memorial Infirmary— Third and Oak Streets. Home, 
City 886; Cumberland, South 900. 

Orphanage of the Good Shepherd— 1418 Morton Avenue. 
Cumberland, East 833. 

Pope Sanatorium — 115 W. Chestnut Street. Home, City 
2122; Cumberland, Main 2122. 

Presbyterian Orphans' Home— 11 18 Preston. Cumberland, 
South 2182. 

Protestant Episcopal Orphans' Home— 219 E. College St. 
Cumberland, Main 2860. 

Red Cross Sanatorium— 1436 S. Shelby. Home, City 7531 . 

Roberts Memorial Sanatorium— 2216 W. Main St. Cum- 
berland, West 862-A. 

St. Anthony's Hospital— Corner Barret and Wickliffe Aves. 
Home, City 2778; Cumberland, East 778. 

86 



St. Helena's— 623 South Fourth Street. Home, City 5392. 

St. Joseph's Infirmary— 637 Fourth St. Home, City 1015; 
Cumberland, Main 1015. 

Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital— Twelfth and R. R. 
Home, City 93, Cumberland, Main 93. 

St. Vincent Orphanage— 2120 Payne St. Home, Crescent 
93. 

South Park Sanatorium— (The Pines) South Park, Ky. Cum- 
berland, South 1347. 

University of Louisville, Academic Dept.— 119 W. Broad- 
way. Cumberland, Main 1078-A. 

Yeaman, Dr. M. H., Beechhurst Sanatorium— Transit Ave. 
(Cumberland. East 257-A; Home, Highland 910. 

Young Women's Boarding Home — 403 W.Broadway. Cum- 
berland, Main 439. 

LIBRARIES. 

Louisville Free Public Library— Main Building Fourth 

and Library Place, 200,000 volumes. George T. Settle, 

Librarian. Home, City 3293; Cumberland, South 2601. 

Highland Branch — Highland Ave and Cherokee Road. 

Cumberland, East 370; Home, City 789. 
Portland Branch— Portland Ave. and Western Park- 
way. Cumberland, W'est 84. Home, Shawnee, 88. 
Crescent Hill Branch— Frankfort and Birchwood Ave- 
nues. Cumberland, East 812; Home, Crescent 81. 
Parkland Branch — Virginia Ave. and Twenty-eighth 

St. Home, Shawnee 32; Cumberland, West 9192. 

Shelby Park Branch— Hancock and Oak. Home, 

City 2677; Cumberland, South 313. ^ 

Jefferson Branch— 1718-1720 W. Jefferson. Honie, 

City 2263; Cumberland, West 9310. 
Western Colored Branch— Tenth and Chestnut. Home 

City 4620; Cumberland, Main 9333. 
Eastern Colored Branch— Hancock and Lampton. 
Home, City 3741. 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary Library— Rev. Edward 
L. Warren, librarian; 100 E. Broadway. Cumberland, 
Main 2729-A. 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Library— Rev. J R. 
Sampev, librarian; 600 W Broadway. Cumberland, 
South 2294. 
Louisville Law Library Co.— Tenth floor Inter-Southern 
Life Building. Judge C. B. Seymour Pres.; Susan A. 
Fleming librarian. Cumberland, Main 878. 
Y. M. C, A. Library— Third and Broadway. Open daily. 

Home, City 719; Cumberland, Main 215. 
Y. M. H. A. Library- Second and Jacob. Home, City 
2179; Cumberland, South 2819. 

CLUBS. 

Active Club of the Louisville Turngemeinde Association- 
South side Broadway between Floyd and Preston. 

Advertising Club— Klein's, 456 South Fourth. 

Annex Social Club— 1804 W. Chestnut. Home, Shawnee 
1294. 

87 



Athletic Club— 1010 Starks Bldg. 

Audubon Country Club— Preston Street Road, beyond City 
limits. Home, City 4595. 

Blue Grass Democratic Club — 1126 W. Broadway. Home, 
City 6795. 

Coulevard Athletic Club — South side Longfield Ave., west 
of Taylor Blvd. 

Business Women's Club— 423-427 W. Walnut. Cumber- 
land, Main 2629. 

Catholic Woman's Club— 615 W. Walnut. Home, City 
3261. 

Cherokee Golf Club— Cherokee Park. Home, City 7155. 

Cherokee Improvement Club— 1950 Duker Ave. 

City Salesman Club— Hotel Henry Watterson. Home. 
City 889. 

Columbia Athletic Club— 621 E. St. Catherine. 

Crescent HHI Forward Club— Crescent Hill. 

Elk's Home— One of Louisville's noted historical land- 
marks. The main building was the home of George 
Keats, a brother of the famous poet, John Keats. 310 
W. Walnut Street. Cumb., Main 587; Home, City 
2428. 

Filson Club— 404 Keller Bldg. 

Harvard Club of Ky.— 906 Lincoln Bldg. 

Lawyers Club— 906 Lincoln Bldg. 

Louisville Athletic Association— Seventh and Kentucky. 

Louisville Automobile Club— 1110 Inter-Southern Life 
Bldg. Home, City 297. 

Louisville Baseball Club— Seventh and Kentucky. Home, 
City 7951; Cumberland, South 173. 

Louisville Commercial Club— 1105-1109 Inter-Southern 
Life Bldg. Home, City 125; Cumberland, Main 125. 

Louisville Boat Club— Cumberland, Main 699. 

Louisville Country Club— Upper River Road. Home, City 
179. 

Louisville Kennel Club— 112 S. Second. 

Louisville Literary Club— 301-303 Library Place. 

Manufacturers Association — Republic Building. 

Medical Library Club— 333 Atherton Bldg. 

New LouisviMe Jockey Club— Office Churchill Downs. 
Home. City 3773. 

Optimists Club — Courier-Journal Office Bldg. 

Pastime Athletic Club— River Road. Home, City 1749. 

Pendennis Club— 322 W. Walnut. Home. City 7938. 

River Valley Club— River Road. Home, City 2526, Cum- 
berland, Main 670. 

Rotary Club— Cumberland, Main 35. 

Soldiers Club— 621 South Fourth. 

South Park Fishing Club— South Park, Ky. Cumb., 
South 1347-Y. 

Standard Club— 1000 S. Third. Home, City 6942. 

Woman's Club of Louisville— 1322 S. Fourth. Cumb., 
South 1716. 

88 



Seelbach Hotel — 400 rooms. European, from $1.50 to $5. 

Homo, City 4200; Cumberland, Main 4200. 
Henry Watterson Hotel— 250 rooms. European, from $1.50 

to $3. Home, City 1977; Cumberland, Main 3400. 
Tyler Hotel— 125 rooms. European, from $1.50 to $3. 

Home, City 9000; Cumberland, Main 3100. 
New Louisville Hotel— 300 rooms. European ariH Amer- 
ican, from $1.50 to $4.50. Home, City 56. 
The Old Inn— 75 rooms. European, from $1.50 to |3. 

Home, City 56. 
Willard Hotel— 125 rooms. American plan only, from $2 

to $4. Home, City 244; Cumberland, Main 2660. 
Victoria Hotel— 70 rooms. European, from $lto $2. Home 

City 2008. 
Watkins Hotel— 115 rooms. European, from 75c to $1.50. 

Home, City 2291. 
Fifth Avenue— 75 rooms. European, from $1 to $3. 

Home, City 627. 
Crescent, The— 403 W. Walnut. Home, City 2040; Cum- 
berland, Main 9136, 
Magnolia Gardens Hotel— Third and Avery— 20 rooms. 

European, from $1.00 to S1.50. Home, City 1633. 
Stag European Hotel— 40 rooms. European, from 50c to 

$1.00. Home, City 1366; Cumberland, Main 9271. 
The Cortlandt— 157 rooms. (Family apartments, few 

transients taken), from $1.00 to $1.50. Home, City 

4304; Cumberland, South 2640. 
The Puritan— 1244 S. Fourth; ninety-four apartments; a 

few transients taken; Sl.OO to $1.50. per dav. Cumb., 

South 2404; Home, City 7222. 
The Hermitage — 50 rooms. European, $1 to $1.50. 

Home, City 9200; Cumberland, Main 1685. 
Antler Hotel Co.— 134-136 W. Jefferson. Home, City 

1941; Cumberland. Main 9302. 
Broadwav Hotel— 830-832 W. Broadway. Home, City 

7813; Cumberland, South 2258 
Capital Hotel— 313-315 E. Market. Home, City 3390 

Cumberland, Main 9361. 
Enterprise Hotel— 228-230 E. Market. Home, City 1934 

Cumberland, Main 9168. 
Normandy Hotel— 111-115 N. Seventh. Home, City 6745 

Cumberland, Main 9251. 
Seventh Avenue Hotel- 116-118 S. Seventh. Home, City 

3784; Cumberland, Main 9354. 



OFFICE BUILDINGS. 
Board of Trade BIdg.— Main and Third. 
Boston BIdg.— 439 S. Fourth. 
Coleman BIdg.— Third and Jefferson. 
Commercial BIdg.— 107 S. Fourth. 
Columbia BIdg.— Fourth and Main. 
Courier-Journal Office BIdg.— Fourth and Green 
Crutcher & Starks BIdg.— Fourth and Jefferson. 
Francis Building— 608 S. Fourth. 
Franklin BIdg.— 654 S. Fourth. 
Gaston BIdg.— 558 S. Fourth. 
Gaulbert BIdg.— 526 S. Fourth. 
Inter-Southern BIdg.— Fifth and Jefferson. 
Iroquois BIdg.— Third and Main. 
Keller BIdg.— 431 W. Main. 
Kentucky Title BIdg.- Fifth and Court Place. 
Kenyon BIdg.- 112 S. Fifth. 
Lincoln Savings Bank BIdg. — Fourth and Market. 
Louisville Trust Co. BIdg.— Fifth and Market, 
Marion E. Taylor BIdg..— 312 S. Fourth. 
Masonic Temple— 316 W. Chestnut. 
Norton BIdg.— 234 S. Fourth. 
Pope BIdg.— Third and Walnut, 
Realty BIdg. — Center and Jefferson. 
Republic BIdg. The— Fifth and Walnut. 
Sachs Law BIdg.— 534 W. Jefferson 
Speed BIdg.— Fourth and Guthrie. 
Starks BIdg.— Fourth and Walnut. 
Stock Yards Exchange— Johnson and Main. 
Todd BIdg. — Fourth and Market. 
Tyler BIdg.— 319 W. Jefferson. 
Union National Bank BIdg.— Sixth and Main 
United States Trust BIdg.— Fifth and Main. 
Walker BIdg.— Fifth and Market. 
Urban BIdg.— 122 S. Fourth. 



90 



BRIDGES. 

The Louisville Bridge was the first one to span the Ohio 
River. It starts at Fourteenth Street and runs to the 
Indiana shore. It was completed and opened for traffic 
on June 24, 1870. It is built on twenty-five piers and cost 
over §2,000,000.00. (It is now being rebuilt, except as 
to piers.) 

The Kentucky and Indiana Bridge, spanning the Ohio 
River from Louisville (Portland), to New Albany, was 
completed June 22, 1886. Length of bridge and ap- 
proaches was 4,519 feet. 

The Second Kentucky and Indiana Bridge, built on the 
same site as the first one, was completed Nov. 27, 1912. 
Length of bridge and approaches, 4,554 feet. The two 
largest spans are 620 feet each. Eight immense piers 
and seven long spans comprise the main structure. One 
of the big spans weighs as much as the entire superstructure 
of the old bridge. The cost was $5,000,000.00. 

Louisville and Jeffersonville Bridge (Big Four), was 
completed in 1895. Six spans cover a total of 2,544 feet 
in length. Total length, including steel viaducts, 5,628 
feet. The cost was over $3,000,000.00. 



CANAL— LOUISVILLE AND PORTLAND. 

Was built and opened for traffic in December, 1830. 
It was operated as a private enterprise until taken under 
control of the United States Government in June, 1868. 
Since that time over $5,000,000.00 has been spent on it 
for improvements. During these eighty-seven years 
work has never ceased on it. Some people naturally 
inquire when will the Canal be completed and work stop. 
The answer is never. It was first capitahzed at $600,000 
in shares of $100 each. The United States Government 
became a shareholder by lirtue of an Act of Congress, 
subscribing for 1,000 shares, and later subscribed for 1.350 
more shares. Tlirough this investment the Government 
got a return of $24,278 more than it had paid for the entire 
stock, which was $257,778. On June 11, 1874, the entire 
control was assumed by the United States Government. 
Tolls were entirely abohshed after midnight, July 1, 1880. 
Since that time the entire expense has been borne directly 
by the United States Government. The Canal is about 
two miles long. On the 21st of December, 1830, the first 
steamboat, the Uncas, passed through it. 



91 



MONUMENTS. 

Henry Clay Statue, in the Rotunda of the Jefferson Co. 
Court House, was unveiled May 30, 1867. Statue is by 
Joel Hart, the sculptor. 

Confederate Monument, Third Street Boulevard, was 
unveiled May 25, 1895. It cost $12,000.00. Erected 
through the efforts of the Louisville Women's Monument 
Association. Main shaft is twenty feet high, surmounted 
by a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier. 

Taylor Monument, erected in the Taylor Burying Ground, 
seven miles east of Louisville on the Brownsboro Road. 
The monument bears a statue of Zachary Taylor, former 
President of the United States. It cost $2,500.00. Com- 
pleted in 1878. 

Daniel Boone Statue, dedicated June 7, 1906. It stands 
in Cherokee Park, and is cast in bronze and was modeled 
by Miss Enid Yandell and cost §5,000.00. 

Thomas Jefferson Monument, stands in front of the 
Jefferson County Court House. The figure of Jefferson 
stands upon a bronze copy of the famous "Liberty Bell." 
It was presented to the people of Kentucky, July 4, 1900, 
by Isaac W. and Bernard Bernheim. The sculptor and 
designer was Moses Ezekiel. It cost $72,000.00. 



HOW TO DEPOSIT MONEY IN THE UNITED STATES 
POSTAL SAVINGS BANKS 



How to Open an Account. 

When a person applies to open an account, he shall 
furnish the necessary information to enable the postmaster 
to fill out an application. This information is entered on a 
cardboard envelope, which the depositor will then be re- 
quired to sign. This application is retained at the post- 
office. 

A SECOND envelope like the first is given to the depos- 
itor. In this the depositor keeps the original certificates 
of deposit which are issued for all sums of 1 1.00 or over up 
to $500.00. 

AMOUNTS from $1.00 to $2,500.00 may be deposited. 
A depositor's balance may not exceed $2,500.00, exclusive 
of interest. 

INTEREST at 2 per cent a year is paid on all eavingB 
from the first of the month after date of deposit. 

MONEY may be drawn out at any time, but interest is 
paid only on the amounts that remain in the bank for the 
full year. 

92 



ANY person 10 years old or over may become a depositor. 

THE ACCOUNT of a married woman is free from inter- 
ference by her husband. 

ACCOUNTS for less than one dollar can be started on 
postal savings cards marked with ten squares. On each 
square the depositor places a special ten-cent stamp until 
the card is full. It is then exchanged for a certificate of 
deposit in the regular postal bank. 

IF A DEPOSITOR loses a certificate he does not lose 
the money deposited. But the postmaster must at once be 
notified of the loss. Mutilation or defacing of a certificate 
may cause delay in payment. 

NO PERSON is permitted to have more than one ac- 
count at the same time. 

THE FAITH of the United States is solemnly pledged 
to the payment of the deposits made in postal savings de- 
positories. (Act of Congress of June 25, 1910.) 

NO PERSON connected with the post office department 
or postal service is permitted to disclose the name of any 
depositor, or give any information concerning his account 
to any person other than the depositor himself unless di- 
rected to do so by the postmaster-general. 

ALL POSTAL SAVINGS depositors have the privilege 
of converting their savings into United States Government 
bonds paying 23-^ per cent interest. These bonds may be 
had in either the coupon or registered form in denomina- 
tions of $20, $100 and $500. There is no limit on the num- 
ber of these bonds a depositor may buy. The bonds are 
exempt from taxes and duties of the Federal government, 
and from State or municipal taxation. The bonds may be 
bought and sold like any other bonds. They can only be 
obtained in the first place by converting Postal Savings 
Certificates, as explained in the first part of the para- 
graph. Postal Savings bonds will be purchased at par by 
the Board of Trustees of the Postal Savings System. 

DOMESTIC MONEY ORDERS issued in the Conti- 
nental United States excepting Alaska, may be paid at 
any Money Order Office in the United States, excepting 
Alaska, if presented for payment on or before the expira- 
tion of the thirtieth day following the date of issue. The 
system thus provides a safe and convenient method for 
traveling men and others to obtain funds at points where 
there are no banks. 

NOW is the time to cultivate the saving habit. 

Foreign Postal Money Order Fees— Sums not exceeding: 

$10.00- .-10c $ 60.00 60c 

20.00 --20c 70.00 . .70c 

30.00 30c 80.00 80c 

40.00 40c 90.00 .,.90c 

50.00 50c 100.00- $1 00 

93 



U. S. GOVERNMENT OFFICES 

Bureau of Animal Industry— Custom House. Home City 
3978. 

Collector of Internal Revenue— Custom House. Home 
City 148; Cumberland Main 811. 

Marine Hospital— Twenty-thijd and High Streets. Home 
Shawnee 932. 

Post Office and Departments— Home City 560; Cumber- 
land Main 560. 

Life Saving Station— River Front between Second and Third 
Streets. Cumberland Main 2733Y 

Railway Mail Service— Custom House. Home City 3966. 

Secret Service— Custom House. Home City 2309. 

Surveyor of Customs— Custom House. Home City 176. 

Weather Bureau- Inter -Southern Bldg. Home City 300; 
Cumberland Main 300. 

UNITED STATES OFFICERS AND OFFICIALS. 

U. S, Circuit and District Courts for the Western District of 

Kentucky, Custom House Building— Walter Evans. 

Judge. Cumberland, Main 1834. 

U.S. District Court Cierl<'s Office— Albert G. Ronald, Clerk . 

U. S. District Attorney— W. V. Gregory. Cumberland, 

Main 3383. 
U. S. Assistant District Attorney— S. M. Russell. 
U. S. Marshal— Edgar H. James, Cumberland Main 2141. 
United, Ckcuit and District Courts are held in Lomsville 

second Mondays in March and October. 
U. S. Commissioner— Jos. A. Craft. Cumberland, Main 

176. 
U. S. Engineer s Office— Lieut. Col. G. R. Lukesh, E. N. 

Parker, Chief Clerk. Cumberland, Main 854. 
U. S. Prohibition Director— Paul Williams, Lexington. 
Prohibition Enforcement Officer— U. G. McFarland, Room 

515. 
Chief Prohibition Inspector— James D. Black (Ex. Gov.) 
Aids— Judge E. Hogge, Henry Maher, Wm. B. Stanfield. 
Inspectors of Steam Vessels— Local 1 

Capt. John E. Abraham, Supervising Inspector and 
Inspector of Hulls. Home City 2819. 

Isaac W. Betts, Inspector of Boilers. 
U. S. Internal Revenue Office — Elwood Hamilton, Collector. 

Wm. F. Grayot, Chief Deputy. Cumberland Main 

1229. 
U. S. internal Revenue Agent — L. A. Miller, Home, City 

1117. 
U. S. Supervising Inspector of Steam Vessels— George M. 

Green. 
U. S. Board of Examining Surgeons for Pensions— Meets 

every first and third Wednesdays at 10 a. m. 
U. S. Post Office— Postmaster, Ernest T. Schmitt; Asst., 

J. Allen Leathers. 
Post Office Inspector— W. E. Greeaaway. 

94 



U. S. Bureau Crop Statistics— H. F. Bryant, Field Agent. 

Room 520. 
U. S. Trachoma Investigation Service— Dr. John S. Mc- 

MuUen. Room 519. 
U. S. Bureau War Risk Insurance— William A.. Robinson. 

Room .521. 
U. S. Special Agent; Bureau of Investigation Department of 

Justice— Claude P. Light. Room 514. 
U. S. Railway Mail Service— Chas. W. "ioung, Chief Clerk, 

Home, City 3996. 
U. S. Army Recruiting Office— Cumberland, Main 738-A. 
U. S. Custodian— Presley S. Ray; W. J. Dealtry, Asst. 

Custodian. 
Secret Service Division— John M. Malley in charge. Home 

City, 2309. 
Surveyor of Customs— Presley S. Ray. Home City 176. 
U. S. Bureau of Animal Industries— John B. Johnson, in- 
spector in charge. 
Custom House and Live Stock Exchange— Home, City 

3978. 
U. S, Weather Bureau— Prof. J. L. Kendall, in charge. 
Inter- Southern Li.'e Building. Cumberland, 

Main 300. 
U. S. Naval Recruiting Office— 
Louisville & Portland Canal- 
Colonel G. M. Hoffman in charge. Home, Shawnee 742. 

Frank 1. Louckes. assistant engineer. 
U. S. Civil Service Commission— Oscar A. Beckman, 

Secretary. 
U. S. Fish Hatchery— North Side Gibson Lane, West of 

Western Parkway; C. W. Burnham, Supt., Shawnee, 

488. 
U. S. Coast Guard— Wm. F. Preston, Captain in Charge. 

Cumberland, Main 2733Y. 
U. S. Marine Hospital— Twenty-third and High Ave., Home 

City 4883, Shawnee, 932, and U. S. Custom House, 

Room 516. 
U. S. National Bank Examiner's Office— Wm. M. Morgan, 

Examiner. Room 205, Home City 2808. 
Consuls and Vice-Consuls— 

L. J. Hermann, Vice-Consul for France and Belgium. 
Office 122 S. Sixth. 

J. Pink Cuneo. Consular Agent for Italy. Office 
340 W. Main. 

R. P. Cane, Consular Agent for Cuba. Office 708 Co- 
lumbia Building. 

LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. 
Private Branch Exchange: 
Home. City 560; Cumberland. Main 560. 
Postmaster— Ernest T. Schmitt. 
Assistant Postmaster— J. A. Leathers. 
Cashier— V. C. Burke. 
Supt. of Mails— C. R. Meeks. 
Office Hours- 
General Delivery, 7 a. m. to 10 p. m. 

Money Order Department, 9 a. m. to 10 p. m. 

Registered Letter Department, 8 a. m. to IC p. m. 

95 



Lettered Stations. 

These stations have all the business qualifications and 
regulations of a post office: 
D — Fifteenth and Kentucky. 
E— Fourth and A. 
F — Fourteenth and Main. 
H— Thirtieth and Broadway. 
Highland Park Branch— Highland Park. 
Baxter Ave. Station— 361 Baxter Ave. 

Numbered Stations. 
No. 1— 

No. 2— 2524 Portland Ave. 

No. 3— Tenth and Chestnut. 

No. 4— Kaufman-Straus Co., 427 S. Fourth. 

No. 5—1764 Frankfort Avenue. 

No. 6— Fourth and Central Ave. 

No. 7—2801 Dumesnil. 

No. 8— 1214 W Market. 

No. 9—400 E. Market. 

No. 10— 

No 11 — ^Louisville Trust Building. 

No. 12— 

No. 14— 1600 Bardstown Road. 

No. 15—541 E Broadway. 

No. 16—2801 W. Chestnut. 

No. 17—2500 W. Market. 

No. 18— 

No. 19— Stewart Dry Goods Co., Fourth and Walnut. 

No. 20—3234 Portland Ave. 

No. 22—2722 Frankfort Ave. 

No. 23—634 W. Main. 

No. 24—101 W. Broadway, 

No. 25—1932 S. Third. 

No. 26—743 E. Market. 

No. 27—1470 S. Seventh. 

No. 28—1600 S. Preston. 

No.29— 

No. 30—1238 S. Eighteenth St. 

No. 31— 

No. 32— 

No. 33—1000 E. Burnett. 

No- 34-Realty Building. 

Post Office Receiots. 

1909 $ 920,846.58 

1910 982,076.37 

1911 1,064,161.87 

1912 1,106,896.26 

1913 1,163,698.18 

1914 1,237,078.32 

1915 1,228.879.96 

1916 1,315,970.11 

1917 1,361,417.40 

1918 1,684,954.63 

1919 1,722,295.33 

96 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 



FOR UNITED STATES, ALASKA, CUBA, PORTO RICO, 
HAWAII, GUAIVI, TUTUILA AND PHILIP- 
PINE ISLANDS 



First Class Matter, two cents an ounce— Letters and all 
other written matter (whether sealed or not), excepting 
manuscript copy accompanying proof-sheets, also matter 
all sealed, 2c an ounce, excepting drop letters at NON- 
CARRIER offices, Ic an ounce. Postal Card, Ic each. 
Return Cards, 2c each. 

Second Class, one cent for four ounces— Newspapers 
and periodicals, published quarterly and oftener, and en- 
tered as second class matter. Publisher's rate from 1% cents 
to 7M cents a pound, according to zone. The general pub- 
lic pay by affixing stamps at the rate of Ic for each four 
ounces or part thereof, when not sealed. 

Third Class, one cent for two ounces — Circulars, other 
printed matter, proof-sheets and manuscript copy, accom- 
panying same, photographs, valentines, sheet music, 
chromos, posters, lithographs and printed advertising 
matter, all, when not sealed, Ic for two ounces or fraction 
thereof. If in packages weighing more than four pounds, 
parcel post rates apply. No writing allowed. 

Sealing — Any matter is regarded as sealed when it is not 
80 wrapped as to allow of a thorough examination without 
in any way injuring the wrapper. 

Registration— First, second and third class matter may 
be registered at any post-office. The fee is 10 cents in 
stamps in addition to the regular postage. 

Special Delivery (extra, in addition to regular postage) > 
ten cents. 

Postal Money Orders — Sums not exceeding 
$2.50 3c $30.00 12c $75.00 25c 

5.00 5c 40.00 15c- 100.00 30c 

10.00 8c 50.00 18c 

20.00 10c 60.00 20c 

One hundred dollars is maximum amount (or which a 
single domestic money order is issued. 

TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

The rates in the case of all foreign countries in the Postal 
Union (except on First Class matter to Canada, Cuba, 
Mexico, Panama, England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, 
Newfoundland, Bahamas, Barbadoes, British Guiana, 
British Honduras, Dutch West Indies, Dominican Re- 
pubhc, Leeward Islands, New Zealand and Trinidad, indu- 
ing Tobago and Windward Islands, which is the same as the 
domestic rate) are as follows: 

Letters, 1st oz. 5c; each additional oz. or fraction, 3c; 
postal cards, 2c each; second and third class matter (called 
"prints"), as described above, Ic for each 2 ounces or frac- 
tion. Commercial papers, deeds, way-bills, invoices, 

97 



bills of lading, insurance policies, manuscript for publi- 
cation, 5c for first 10 ozs., and Ic foreach additional 2 ounces. 
Samples of merchandise, 2c for first four ounces or lesss and 
leant for each additional two ounces or fraction. 

Registration Fee— On letters or packets, 10c. 

Parcels-Post — (For list of countries and limit on size, 
inquire at Post Office), 12c per pound or fraction, with ex- 
ceptions. 

Mall to U. S. Army and Navy — Same as Domestic rates, 
regardless of where stationed. 

PARCEL POST OR FOURTH-CLASS MAIL. 

Rates of Postage, Classification Insurance and C. 0. D. 
Features, Wrapping, Etc. 

Fourth-Class Matter Embraces that known as domestic 
parcel post mail, and includes merchandise, farm and 
factory products, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions, 
and plants, books (including catalogs), miscellaneous 
printed matter weighing more than four pounds, and all 
other mailable matter not embraced in the first, second 
and third classes. 

Extent and Usefulness of Parcel Post. — The domestic 
parcel post offers a convenient, quick, and efficient means 
of transporting mailable parcels to any post office in the 
United States or its possessions. The service reaches more 
places than any other transportation agency. It brings 
producers and consumers into closer contact, thus open- 
ing the way to reducing the high cost of living. Special 
treatment and advantages are accorded to shipments of 
farm products weighing between 20 and 70 pounds. 
Low postage rates, based on the service rendered, are 
provided. The rates to nearby zones are particularly 
advantageous. Parcels may be insured against loss and 
may be sent C. 0. D., and as special-delivery matter. 

Rates of Postage of Fourth-Class or Parcel Post Matter 
—To be FuKy Prepaid— Unsealed— are as follows: 

(a) Parcels weighing 4 ounces or less, except books, 
seeds, plants, etc., 1 cent for each ounce or fraction thereof, 
any distance, 

(b) Parcels weighing 8 ounces or less, containing books, 
seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions and plants, 1 cent for 
each 2 ounces or fraction thereof, regardless of distance. 

(c) Parcels weighing more than 8 ounces, containing 
books, seeds, p'acts. etc., parcels or miscellaneous printed 
matter weighing more than 4 pounds, and all other parcels 
of fourth-class matter weighing more than 4 ounces, are 
chargeable, according to distance or zone, at the pound 
rates shown in the following table, a fraction of a pound 
being considered a full pound. 



98 



Zones. 



71 



§ a 



SOI =-*< 



? 


$ 


S 












0.05 


0.05 


0.05 


$0.06 


$0.07 


$0.08 


$0.09 


$0.11 


.06 


.06 


.06 


.08 


.11 


.14 


.17 


.21 


.06 


.07 


.07 


.10 


.15 


.20 


.25 


.31 


.07 


.08 


.08 


.12 


.19 


.26 


.33 


.41 


.07 


.09 


.09 


.14 


.23 


.32 


.41 


.51 


.08 


.10 


.10 


.16 


.27 


.38 


.49 


.61 


.08 


.11 


.11 


.18 


.31 


.44 


.57 


.71 


.09 


.12 


.12 


.20 


.35 


.50 


.65 


.81 


.09 


.13 


.13 


.22 


.39 


.56 


.73 


.91 


.10 


.14 


.14 


.24 


.43 


.62 


.81 


1.01 


.10 


.15 


.15 


.26 


.47 


.68 


.89 


1.11 


.11 


.16 


.16 


.28 


.51 


.74 


.97 


1.21 


.11 


.17 


.17 


.30 


.55 


.80 


1.05 


1.31 


.12 


.18 


.18 


.32 


.59 


.86 


1.13 


1.41 


.12 


.19 


.19 


.34 


.63 


.92 


1.21 


1.51 


.13 


.20 


.20 


.36 


.67 


.98 


1.29 


1.61 


.13 


.21 


.21 


.38 


.71 


1.04 


1.37 


1.71 


.14 


.22 


.22 


.40 


.75 


1.10 


1.45 


1.81 


.14 


.23 


.23 


.42 


.79 


1.16 


1.53 


1.91 


.15 


.24 


.24 


.44 


.83 


1.22 


1.61 


2.01 


.15 


.25 


.25 


.46 


.87 


1.28 


1.69 


2.11 


.16 


.26 


.26 


.48 


.91 


1.34 


1.77 


2.21 


.16 


.27 


.27 


.50 


.95 


1.40 


1.85 


2.31 


.17 


.28 


.28 


.52 


.99 


1.46 


1.93 


2.41 


.17 


.29 


.29 


.54 


1.03 


1.52 


2.01 


2.51 


.18 


.30 


.30 


.56 


1.07 


1.58 


2.09 


2.61 


.18 


.31 


.31 


.58 


1.11 


1.64 


2.17 


2.71 


.19 


.32 


.32 


.60 


1.15 


1.70 


2.25 


2.81 


.19 


.33 


.33 


.62 


1.19 


1.76 


2.33 


2.91 


.20 


.34 


.34 


.64 


1.23 


1.82 


2.41 


3.01 


.20 


.35 


.35 


.66 


1.27 


1.88 


2.49 


3.11 


.21 


.36 


.36 


.68 


1.31 


1.94 


2.57 


3.21 


.21 


.37 


.37 


.70 


1.35 


2.00 


2.65 


3.31 


.22 


.38 


.38 


.72 


1.39 


2.06 


2.73 


3.41 


.22 


.39 


.39 


.74 


1.43 


2.12 


2.81 


3.51 


.23 


.40 


.40 


.76 


1.47 


2.18 


2.89 


3.61 


.23 


.41 


.41 


.78 


1.51 


2.24 


2.97 


3.71 


.24 


.42 


.42 


.80 


1.55 


2.30 


3.05 


3.81 


.24 


.43 


.43 


.82 


1.59 


2.36 


3.13 


3.91 


.25 


.44 


.44 


.84 


1.63 


2.42 


3.21 


4.01 


.25 


.45 


.45 


.86 


1.67 


2.48 


3.29 


4.11 


.26 


.46 


.46 


.88 


1.71 


2.54 


3.37 


4.21 


.26 


.47 


.47 


.90 


1.75 


2.60 


3.45 


4.31 


.27 


.48 


.48 


.92 


1.79 


2.66 


3.53 


4.41 


.27 


.49 


.49 


.94 


1.83 


2.72 


3.61 


4.51 


.28 


.50 


.50 


.96 


1.87 


2.78 


3.69 


4.61 


.28 


.51 


.51 


.98 


1.91 


2.84 


3.77 


4.71 



99 



Zones — Continued. 






3 5R 


-2 S 


s^ 








o'g 


s'a 


^H 
































tn 


s-^ 




$2.90 


$3.85 


$4.81 


2.9fi 


3.93 


4.91 


3.02 


4.01 


5.01 





S 


$ 


$ 




48 


.29 


.52 


.52 


$1.00 


49 


.29 


.53 


.53 


1.02 


50 


.30 


.54 


.54 


1,04 


51 


.30 


.55 


.55 


1,06 


52 


.31 


.56 


.56 


1.08 


53 


.31 


.57 


.57 


1.10 


54 


.32 


.58 


.58 


1.12 


55 


.32 


.59 


.59 


1.14 


56 


.33 


.60 


.60 


1.16 


57 


.33 


.61 


.61 


1.18 


58 


.34 


.62 


.62 


1,20 


59 


.34 


.63 


.63 


1.22 


fiO 


.35 


.64 


.64 


1.24 


61 


.35 


.65 


.65 


1.26 


62 


.36 


.66 


.66 


1.28 


63 


.36 


.67 


.67 


1.30 


64 


.37 


,68 


,68 


1.32 


65 


.37 


.69 


.69 


1.34 


66 


.38 


.70 


.70 


1.36 


67 


,38 


.71 


,71 


1.38 


68 


.39 


.72 


.72 


1.40 


69 


.39 


.73 


.73 


1,42 


70 


.40 


.74 


.74 


1.44 



$1. 
1 

2.03 



$5.76 
5.88 
6.00 



NOTES: Zones and Unit 
Numbers. For parcel post 
purposes the United States is 
divided into units of area 30 
minutes square, which form 
the basis of 8 postal zones. 
The number of the unit in 
which each office is located 
(a branch office or station be- 
ing in the same unit as the 
main office) is shown after the 
name of the office in the State 
list of the Official Postal 
Guide, except those in Alaska, 
Canal Zone, Guam, Samoan 
Islands, and the United States 
Postal Agency, Shanghai, 
China, concerning which see 
paragraph in next column. 
Additions and changes in unit 
numbers appear in the monthly supplements to the 
Postal Guide. 

To ascertain in which zone a post office is located 
from the office of mailing, first obtain the unit number of 
the office of address from the Guide, then find the line 
containing this number in the zone key for the unit of the 
mailing office, and the figure in the column opposite will be 
the number of the zone. The Guide is applicable to all 
offices, but a separate zone key is required for each unit. 
The zone keys, which make the use of parcel post maps 
unnecessary, are furnished to purchasers of the Postal Guide 
and, upon application, to the postal service. 

NOTE: The local rate apphes to parcels mailed: 

(1) At any post offiee for local delivery at such office. 

(2) At any city letter-carrier office, or at any point 
within its deUvery limits, for delivery by carriers from that 
office. 

(3) At any post office from which a riu'al route starts, 
for delivery on such a route, or when mailed at any point on 
a rural route for delivery at any other point thereon, or at 
the office from which the route starts, or for delivery on any 
other rural route starting from the same office. 



100 



Official Postal Guide: $1.50 per copy. 

Supplements issued monthly, except in July. Supple- 
ments add 7oc to the above cost. Orders for the Postal 
Guide may be obtained from Disbursing Clerk, Post Office 
Dept., Washington, D. C, upon receipt of above prices. 

INSURANCE OF FOURTH-CLASS PARCEL POST MAIL. 

Fees and conditions. — Fourth-class or domestic parcel 
post mail (but no other) may be insured against loss, rifling 
or damage, upon payment of a fee of 3c for value not ex- 
ceeding $5.00; 5 cents for value not exceeding S25; 10 cents 
for value not exceeding $50, or 25 cents for value not ex- 
ceeding $100.00, in addition to the postage, both to be 
prepaid, with stamps affixed. It may not be registered. 

Such mail may be insured at any post office or station 
thereof, or by rural carriers. 

Return Receipts for Insured Parcels may be obtained by 
indorsing the parcels "Return receipt desired." 

Indemnity for Lost Insured Parcels— Indemnity within 
the prescribed limit will be paid for the market value of 
merchandise lost, or the actual, usual, direct or necessary 
cost of repairs whichever the Department may decide upon. 

No indemnity will be paid for lost or damaged insured 
mail unless the claim is made within six months from the 
date the parcel was mailed, unless it is established to the 
satisfar:tion of the Department that the delay was unavoid- 
able and due to no fault of the claimant. 

COLLECT-ON-DELIVERY SERVICE 

The sender of a mailable parcel of fourth class matter 
on which the postage is fully prepaid may have the price 
of the article and the charges thereon collected from the 
addressee on payment of a fee of 10 cents in postage stamps 
affixed, provided the amount to be remitted does not ex- 
ceed $50, and on the payment of a fee of 25 cents in postage 
stamps affixed, provided the amount to be remitted does 
not exceed $100. Such a parcel will be insured against 
injury or loss, without additional charge, in an amount 
equivalent to its actual value, but not to exceed $50 when 
a 10-cent fee is paid, and $100 when a 25-cent fee is paid. 

The sender of a C. 0. D. parcel will not be permitted 
to pay a fee of only 10 cents thereon when the amount 
to be remitted is greater than $50.00, even though he 
should be wiUing to accept indemnity only for $50.00 in 
case of loss; but when the value of the contents of a parcel 
exceeds $50.00 and the remittance to be made to the 
sender is 850.00 or less, the parcel may, if the sender so 
desires, have a 25-cent fee paid thereon, entitling him to 
indemnity for any loss or damage sustained, not in excess 
of $100.00. A parcel on which the remittance is to be 
$50.00, but on which, because of the money order fee, 
the collection from the addressee would be in excess of 
that amount, will require only a 10-cent fee. 

101 



A Receipt is given to the sender of a "CO. D." parcel 
at the time of mailing but no return receipt is furnished, aa 
the remittance shows that delivery has been made. 

Examination of Contents of a "C. Q. D." Parcel is not 
permitted until it has been receipted for and a', charges 
paid. 

Indemnity for Lest "C. 0. D " Farce's is paid for the 
actual value not to exceed $100.00, according to fee paid, 
under the conditions governing the payment of indemnity for 
lost insured parcels. 

INTEREST CALCULATIONS 

RULE — Multiply the principal by as many one hun- 
dredths as there are days, and then divide as follows: 
Percent, 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 
Divide by 90 72 60 52 45 40 36 30 

EXAMPLE— Interest on SIOO. for 90 days at 5 per cent.: 
100 X 90=9.00 divided by 72 = 1.25 (one dollar and 25 
cents); on $1. for 30 days at 6 per cent.: 1 x .30— .300, 
divided by 60 =.005 (5 mills). 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Troy Weight— 24 graina=l pwt.: 20 pwts. = l ounce; 
12 ounces =1 poimd. Used for weighing gold, silver, and 
jeweLs. 

Apothecaries' Weight— 20 grains =1 scruple; 3 scruples = 
1 dram; 8 drams = 1 ounce; 12 ounces =1 pound. The ounce 
and pound in this are the same as in Troy weight. 

Avoirdupois Weight— 27 11-32 grain3=l dram; 16 drams 
= 1 ounce; 16 ounces = l pound; 25 pounds=l quarter; 4 
quarters = 1 cwt.; 2,000 pounds = 1 short ton; 2,240 pounds = 
1 long ton. 

Dry Measure— 2 pint«i = l quart; 8 quarts=l peck; 4 
pecks =1 bushel; 36 bushels =1 chaldron. 

Liquid Measure — 4 gill3 = l pmt; 2 pints=l quart; 4 
quarts=l gallon; 31H gallons = l barrel; 2 barrels=l hogs- 
head. 

Time Measure — 60 seconds=l minute; 60 minutes=l 
hour; 24 hours = l day; 7days=l week; 28, 29, 30 or 
31 days=l calendar month; (30 days=l month in com- 
puting interest); 365 days=l year; 366 days=l leap year. 

Circular Measure— 60 seconds = 1 minute; 60 minutes =1 
degree; 30 degrees =1 sign; 90 degrees = 1 quadrant; 4 
quadrants =12 signs, or 360 degrees =1 circle. 

Long Measure— 12 inches = 1 foot; 3 feet=l yard; 5H 
yards =1 rod; 40 rods=l furlong; 8 furlongs =1 stat. mile; 

3 miles=l league. 

Cloth Measure — 234 inches =1 nail; 4 nails =1 quarter; 

4 quarters =1 yard. 

Mariners' Measure — 6 feet=l fathom; 120 fathoms=l 
cable length; 7H cable lengths = l mile; 5,280 feet=l stat. 
mile; 6,085 feet=l naut. mile. 

Miscellaneous — 3 inches=l pahn; 4 inches = l hand; 6 
inche8=l span; 18 inche3=l cubit; 21.8 inches=l Bible 
cubit; 2J^ feet=l mihtary pace. 

102 



Square Measure — 144 sq. inche3=l square foot; 9 sq. 
feet=l sq. yard; Z(i}4 sq. yard3=l sq. rod; 40 sq. rod8=l 
rood; 4 roods = 1 acre; 640 acr&s=l sq. mile. 

Surveyors' Measure — 7.92 inche3=l link; 25 link3=l 
rod; 4 rods=l chain; 10 sq. chains or 160 sq. rods=l acre; 
640 acres =1 sq. mile; 36 sq. miles (6 miles square) = 1 
township. 

Cubic Measure— 1,728 cubic inches = 1 cubic foot; 27 
cubic feet=l cubic yard; 2,150.42 cubic inches=l standard 
bushel; cubic 263.3 inches = l standard gallon; 1 cubic 
foot=abQut four-fifths of a bushel; 128 cubic feet=l cord 
(wood); 40 cubic feet=l ton (shipping). 

Metric Equivalent s— Linear— 1 centimeter =0.8987 
inches: 1 decimeter = 3.937 inches=0.328 feet; 1 meter= 
39.37 inches = 1.0936 yards; 1 dekameter= 1.9884 rods, 1 
kilometer=0.62137 miles. 
Square— 1 sq. centimeter=0.1550 sq. in.; 1 sq. deci- 
meter=0.1076 sq. ft.; 1 sq. meter= 1.196 sq. yds.; 
1 acre=3,954 sq rds.; 1 hektar=2.47 acres; 1 sq. 
kilometer =0.386 sq. miles. 
Volume— 1 cubic centimeter =0.061 cubic in.; 1 cubic 
decimeter =0.0353 cubic ft.; 1 cubic meter. 1 8ter= 
1.308 cubic vds., 0.2759 cd; 1 liter=0.908 qt. dry, 
1.0567 qts. liq.; 1 dekaliter=2.6417 gals., .135 
peck; lhektohter=2.8375bus. 
Weights— 1 gram=0.03527 ounce; 1 kilogram =2.2046 
lbs.; 1 metric ton= 1.1023 English tons. 
Approximate Metric Equivalents— 1 decimeter=4 inches; 

1 meter = l.l yard; 1 kilometer=ys of mile; 1 hektar = 23^ 
acres; 1 star, or cubic meter =3^ of a cord; 1 liter = 1.06 qts. 
liquid, 0.9 qt. dry; 1 hektoliter=238 bushels; 1 kilogram = 

2 1-5 lbs.; 1 metric ton=2,200 lbs. 

LEGAL WEIGHTS OF PRODUCE PER BUSHEL 
IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The following are minimum weights of certain articles 
of produce according to the laws of the U. S.: 

Per Bushel 

Wheat 60 pounds 

Corn, in the ear 70 " 

Corn, shelled 56 " 

Rye 56 " 

Buckwheat 48 " 

Barley 48 " 

Oats 32 " 

Peas 60 " 

White Beans 60 " 

Castor. Beans 46 

White Potatoes 60 " 

Sweet Potatoes 55 " 

Onions 57 " 

Turnips 55 " 

Dried Peaches 33 " 

103 



Per Bushel 

Dried Apples 26 pounds 

Clover Seed 60 " 

Flax Seed 56 " 

Millet Seed 50 " 

Hungarian Grass Seed 50 " 

Timothy Seed 45 " 

Blue Grass Seed 44 " 

Hemp Seed 44 " 

Salt (see Note below). 

Corn Meal 48 " 

Ground Peas 24 

Malt 34 " 

Bran 20 " 

SALT— Weight per bushel as adopted by different 
States ranges from 50 to 80 pounds. Coarse salt in Pennsyl- 
vania is reckoned at 80 pounds, and in Illinois at 50 pounds 
per bushel. Fine salt in Pennsylvania is reckoned at 62 
pounds, in Kentucky and IlUnois at 55 pounds per bushel. 

WHEN AND HOW TO DISPLAY THE FLAG OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 

When the Flag should be Displayed at Full Staff. 

Lincoln's Birthday February 12th. 

Washington's Birthday February 22nd. 

Jefferson Day April 17th. 

Battle of Lexington (Patriots Day) April 19th. 

♦Memorial Day May 30th. 

Flag Day June 14th. 

Battle of Bunker Hill June 17th. 

Independence Day Ju'y 4th. 

LaFayette Day September 6th . 

"Star Spangled Banner" Day (Baltimore) .September 13th. 

Paul Jones Day September 23rd. 

Columbus Day October 12th. 

Battle of Saratoga October 17th. 

Surrender of Yorktown October 19th. 

Evacuation Day (New York) November 25th. 

*0n Memorial Day, May 30th, the Flag should fly at 
half staff from sunrise to noon, and full staff from noon to 
sunset. 

STARS AND STRIPES 

Is the official name of the National Flag of the United 
States. In the Army our National flag is called the Stand- 
ard, also the Colors. When borne with another flag, the 
regimental color, the two flags are called a "Stand of 
Colors." In the Navy our National flag is known as the 
U. S. Ensign. 

To Show Proper Respect for the Flag the Followihg 
Should be Observed: 

DISPLAY 
The flag should not be hoisted before sunrise nor al- 
lowed to remain up after sunset. 

104 



At "Retreat" sunset, civilian spectators should stand 
at "attention" and uncover during the playing of the 
"Star Spangled Banner." Military spectators are re- 
quired by regulation to stand at "attention" and give the 
military salute. During the playing of the National 
Hymn at "Retreat", the flag should be lowered but not 
then allowed to touch the ground. 

When the flag is flown at half staff as a sign of mourning, 
it should be hoisted to full staff at the conclusion of the 
funeral. 

In placing the flag at half staff, it should first be hoisted 
to the top of the staff, and then lowered to position, dropping 
it from the top of the staff the distance of the width of the 
flag, and preliminary to lowering from half staff it should 
first be raised to the top. 

On shipboard, the National Flag is the flag to be raised 
first and lowered last. 

Wliere several flags are displayed on poles, with the 
National Flag, the Stars and Stripes should be hoisted 
first, and on the tallest, and most conspicuous staff. Where 
two flags are displayed, one our National Flag, it should be 
placed on the right. (To ascertain the right of a building, 
face in the same direction as the building.) No flag should 
ever be flown from the same staff as the U. S. Flag, ex- 
cept in the Navy; then only during Divine Service, when 
the Church Pennant may be displayed above the National 
Flag — God above Country. 

WTien, in parade, the National Flag is carried with any 
other flag, it should have the place of honor, at the right. 
If a number of flags are carried, the National Flag should 
either precede the others or be carried in the center, above 
the others, on a higher staff. 

When flags are used in unveiling a monument, tablet 
or statue, they should not fall to the ground, but be car- 
ried aloft, forming a distinctive feature of the ceremony. 

When the National Flag is used as a banner, the union 
should be at the_ right (as you face the flag). When used 
as an altar covering, the union is at the right (as you face 
the altar), and nothing should ever be placed upon the 
flag except the Holy Bible. 

The Flag should never be flown reversed except 'd case 
of distress at sea. 

Portraying the Flag. 

To properly illustrate the flag, the staff should always 
be at the left of the picture with the flag floating to the right. 
When two flags are crossed, the National Flag should be 
at the right. If the National Flag is pictured as a banner, 
the union is at the right. 

105 



Salute. 

When the National Colors are passing in parade or in 
review, the spectator should, if walking, halt, and if sitting 
arise and stand at "attention" and uncover. 

The National Salute is one gun for every State. 

The International Salute is, under the Law of Nations, 
21 guns. 

On shore the flag should not be dipped by way of salute 
or compliment. 

Oral Flag Salute. 
"I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the Republic for 

which it stands: 
One nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all." 

TABLE — Showing the number of days from any date 
in one month to the same date in any other month 

FROM ~ 

I "" " ■ 



TO 



>^ 



^ 2. 



"o en- 



Jan ... 
Feb.... 
March 
April . . 
May .. 
June .. 
July .. 
Aug . . . 
Sept... 
Oct ... 
Nov .. 
Dec... 



.3651 31 59 
,334365 28 
, 3063371365 
,275 306'334 
, !245;276;304 
,214 245 274 
1841215 243 
153!184!212 
122153181 
I 92123151 
I 611 92120 
31! 62, 90 



90120 

59; 89, 

31 61 
365 30 61 
335,365 
304334 
273 304 
243 273 
212 242 
182212 
151181 
121151 



151:181212 
1201.50181 

92,122153 
91 122; 

31: 6li 92 
3651 30 61 
335 365 31 
304 334 365 
273 303 334 
243 273 304 
212 242 273 
182 212 243 



1243 273 304 334 

212 242 273 303 

ll84'214'245 275 

153,183,214 244 

123 1531184 214 

92122153183 

62 92123153 

31| 61 92122 

3651 30 61 91 

335365 31! 61 

304334 365 30 

274304 335 365 



EXAMPLE — How many days from May 5th to October 
5th? Look for May at left hand and October at the top; 
in the angle is 153. In leap-year add one day if February 
is included. 

INCOME ON INVESTMENTS 
Par Value $100 



Cost 


4 prct 


5 per ct 6 pr ct,7 pr ctl 8 per ct 


10 prct 


< 50.00 


S8.00 


SIO.OO $12.00$14.0o!$16.00 


$20.00 


60.00 


6.67 


8.33 


10.00 11.66 13.33 


16 66 


70.00 


5.71 


7.14 


8.57 10.00 11.42 


14.28 


75 00 


5.34 


6.66 


8.00 9 33 10 66 


13.35 


80 00 


5.00 


6.25 


7.50j 8.75 10 00 


12.50 


85.00 


4.70 


5 88 


7.05 8.23; 9.41 


11.76 


90.00 


4 44 


5.55 


6.66| 7.771 8.88 


11.11 


95.00 


4.21 


5.26 


6.31! 7.36 8.42 


10.52 


100.00 


4.00 


5.00 


6.OO1 7.00 8.00 


10.00 


105.00 


3.81 


4.76 


5.71 


6.66 7.61 


9.52 


110.00 


3.64 


4.54 


5.45 


6.36 7.27 


9.09 


115.00 


3.48 


4.34 


5.21 


6.081 6.95 


8.69 


120.00 


3.33 


4.16 


5.00 


5.831 6.66 


8.33 



106 



TABLE— Showing the time in which a sum will double 
itself at' the following rates of interest. 



Rate 



Simple Interest | Compound Interest 



2 per cent, j 50 years ; 35 years 1 day 



3 per cent 

4 per cent. 

5 per cent . 

6 per cent . 
8 per cent . 

10 percent. 



33 years, 4 months . 

25 years 

20 years 

16 years, 8 months. 
12 years, 6 months. 
10 years 



23 years 164 days 

17 years 246 days 

14 years 75 days 

11 years 327 days 

9 years 2 days 

7 years 100 days 



LOUISVILLE & INTERURBAN RAILROAD 

Terminal Station on Jefferson Street, between Third 

and Fourth. Time Table in Effect Monday, 

April 26, 1920. 

Lagrange Division — Trains for Lagrange and way 
stations leave Brook and Liberty daily 4:16 a. m.. Terminal 
Station daily and hourly 5:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m.; then 8:00, 
9:30 and 11:30 p. m. Additional trains daily, except Sun- 
days and Holidays, for Lagrange 5:30 p. m.; for Pewee 
Valley 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30 a. m., and daily at 2:30, 3:30, 
4:30, 5:30, 6:30 p. m. 

Shelbyville Division— Trains for Shelbyville and way 
stations leave Brook and Liberty daily 3:50 a. m. Ter- 
minal Station daily 4:45, 5:15, 6:15, 8:15, 10:15 a. m., 12:15, 
2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 8:15, 10:15 and 11:40 p. m. 

Prospect Division— Trains for Prospect and way sta- 
tions leave Terminal Station daily 5:22 a. m., hourly 6:08 
a. m. to 10:08 p. m.; then 11:22 p. m. Additional trains 
daily except Sundays and Holidays to Harrods Creek 6:08 
a. m., to Florida Heights 7:34 a. m., to Glenview 4:18 p. m., 
and to Prospect 5:38 p. m. 

Jeffersontown Division— Trains for Jeffersontown and 
way stations leave Terminal Station daily 5:00, 6:05, 7:05; 
then hourly 8:20 a. m. to 7:20 p. m., 9:20 and 11:20 p. m. 
Additional trains daily except Sundays and Holidays, 4:33, 
6:35 a. m., 5:50 p. m., and on Saturday and Sunday only 
at 8:20 and 10:20 p. m. 

Salt River Division— Trains for Orell and way stations 
leave Terminal Station daily 5:00 a. m., hourly 5:50 a. m. 
to 9:.50 p. m., 11:40 p. m. Additional trains daily 5:20 
p. m., daily except Sundays and Hulidays 4:35, 6:20 a. m.; 
Sundays only 12:20, 1:20, 2:20, 3:20, 4:20, 6.20, 7.20 p.m., 
and on Satm-day and Sunday only at 10:50 p. m. 

Fern Creek Division— Trains for Fern Creek and way 
stations leave Terminal Station daily and hourly 4:50 a. m. 
to 7:50 p. m., 9:50 and 11:35 p. m. Additional trains daily 
except Sundays and Holidays 5:20 a. m., 5:20 p. m., and on 
Saturday and Sunday only 8:50 and 10:50 p. m. 

107 



Okolona Division— Trains for Okolona and way sta- 
tions leave Terminal Station daily 5:13, 6:23, 7:52, 9:22, 
10:52 a. m., 12:22, 1:52, 3:22, 4:52, 6:22, 7:52, 9:22, 11:00 
p. m. Additional train daily, except Sundays and Holidays, 
5:37 p. m. 



INDIANAPOLIS & LOUISVILLE TRACTION RY. CO. 

Jno. E. Greeley, General Manager, 
offices, Scottsburg, Ind. 

Hoosier Flyers leave Louisville for Scottsburg, Sey- 
mour, Columbus, Franklin, Edinburg and Indianapolis 
at 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 a. m., and 1:30, 4:30 and 6:30 p. m. 
Local cars leave Louisville for Seymour and all intermedi- 
ate points at 6:30, 8:30 and 10:30 a. m. and 12:30, 3:30, 5:30, 
8:30 and 11:15 p.m. 

Connection at Seymour with local cars for Indianapolis 
and intermediate points Southeastern line and B. & 0. 



LOUISVILLE & NORTHERN RAILWAY AND LIGHTING 
COMPANY. 

Terminal Station, Third, bet. Green and Walnut. 
Main Line — Louisville to Indianapolis. 
Charlestown Division— Jeffersonville, Watson and Charles- 
town. 
Daisy Division— New Albany and Silver Hills. 

OWL CARS. 
Fourth Avenue. 

Leaving Central Ave, 

A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. 
1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 

let & Main 

1:27 1:57 2:27 2:57 3:27 3:57 4:27 5:00 



Portland and Shelby. 

Leaving Portland 

A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. 

12:32 1:02 1:32 2:02 2:32 3:02 3:32 4:02 4:32 6:02 

Shelby St. 

12:42 1:12 1:42 2:12 2:42 3:12 3:42 4:12 4:42 .... 



108 



via Walnut Street. 

Leaving 46th and Broadway 

A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. A.M. 

12:04 1:04 2:04 3:04 4:04 5:04 

Parkland 

12:38 1:38 2:38 3:38 4:38 

Douglas Blvd. 

1:04 1:34 2:04 2:34 3:04 3:34 4:04 4:34 5:12 

Market Street. 



Leaving 
Shawnee Park 
Clifton 


A.M. A.M 
12:05 1:05 
12:44 1:44 

Crescent Hi!l. 


A.M 
205 
2:44 


A.M. 
3:05 
3:44 


A.M. 
4:05 
4:44 


7th & Jefferson 
Crescent Hill 


A.M. 
1:00 
1:30 


A.M. 
2:00 
2:30 


AM. 
300 
3:30 


A.M. 
4:00 
4:35 



STEAM BOAT LINES. 

Louisville & Cincinnati Packet Co.— Wharfboat, foot of 

Third St. 'Phone City 141. 
Louisville & Evansville Mail Line Co.— Wharfboat, foot of 

Fourth St. 'Phone Main 171. 
Louisville & Kentucky River Packet Co.— Wharfboat, foot 

of Third. 



109 



POPULAR ROAD TRIPS. 

THE DIXIE HIGHWAY. 

The Dixie Highway is the most historic and the favorite 
route to the South from Louisville. It is built on the old 
Louisville and Nashville Turnpike, which was constructed 
by the State of Kentucky at a cost of $10,000 a mile. It 
has no grade on it over four per cent from Louisville to 
Nashville and not a single reverse curve. The gear of an 
automobile does not have to be changed over the whole 
route. Jefferson, Hardin and Hart counties, which carry 
the tourist to Lincoln Farm and to Mammoth Cave, have 
spent in the last two years under State supervision $200,000 
in resurfacing this magnificent highway. It is seventeen 
miles shorter to Lincoln Farm and nineteen miles nearer 
to Mammoth Cave than the Jackson Highway. It passes 
through Elizabethtown, one of the oldest and most historic 
places in Kentucky. It was at this place that Thomas 
Lincoln, the father of Abraham Lincoln lived. It was 
where he married his second wife, Miss Bush, who raised 
the Martyred President. A log cabin near the Dixie 
Highway was built by Thomas Lincoln and still stands. 
It was the home of Gov. Helm and Gov. John Young Brown 
and of Gen. Ben Hardin Helm, who was killed at Chica- 
mauga. Several cannon balls still in the house can be seen, 
shot there by Gen. John Morgan when he captured the 
city from a regiment of Federal troops. The Dixie High- 
way passes through the principal street of the city, which 
is regarded as the prettiest from Chicago to Miami. Mun- 
fordville, the county seat of Hart, is also full of historic 
interest. It was here that Gen. Bragg fought a great 
battle and it was the home town of Gen. Simon Boliver 
Buckner. 

LINCOLN FARM. 

Lincoln Farm is located in La Rue county, Kentucky, 
three miles from Hodgenville, the county seat. The prop- 
erty was settled and cleared by Thomas Lincoln in the 
early years of the Nineteenth century, and a rude cabin 
of one room was built on the hill above the spring. In this 
cabin Abraham Lincoln was born February 12, 1809. 
The property passed through the hands of a number of 
owners, until an association was formed to purchase it 
and dedicate it to the nation as a memorial to Lincoln. 
A memorial building has been erected at a cost of $160,000, 
and the original cabin is now housed in this building. 

The building is kept closed, but an attendant may be 
found at the gate house at the entrance to the park. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY. 
(Via West Point and Elizabethtown to Mammoth Cave, 
also to Hodgenville and Lincoln Farm.) 
Routes No. 1 and 2. 
0.0 99.6 LOUISVILLE. Fourth and Walnut streets. 
Seelbach Hotel. Go South on Fourth Street 
two blocks. 
0.3 99.3 ^roadway, turn right with trolley two blocks. 

110 



0.5 99.1 Large brick church on left; turn left with trolley 

on Sixth Street. 
1.3 98. 3 Oak Street, turn right with trolley under R. R. 

at 1.6 and 1.9. 
2.5 97.1 Eighteenth Street, turn left with trolley, passing 

Laib Co. 3, and crossing trolley 3.7. 
5.8 93.8 St. Helens straight ahead. Rejoin trolley 5.9. 

Follow trolley on Kentucky rock asphalt 

road. Trolley ends 14.5. 
14.8 84.8 Orell, road forks; turn right. 
15.8 83.8 Meadowlawn, 3-corners; straight through along 

the Ohio River bank. 

19.0 80.6 Cross R. R. and take right-hand road beyond. 

Cross long iron bridge high above Salt River 
21.2andR.R. 21.4 into 
21.5 78.1 WEST POINT, 4-corners; straight through. 
Avoid road to right 22.5 and cross R. R. at 
station 22.6. Go under R. R. 24.1 and 
ascend long, winding grade up Muldraugh's 
Hill. Pass Dripping Springs on left 25.2 
and continue up easy grade, winding and 
rolling. 

29.1 70.5 Fork; bear left with travel. Follow poles direct 

into 

46.0 53.6 ELIZABETHTOWN. Court House ahead in 

small square. Jog right and left around 
square, and then left and right into main 
road. Cross R. R. at station 46.2 and again 
46.3—46.7—47.2. 

48.2 51.4 3-corners; bear slightly right. 

(Left is dirt and macadam road to Lincoln 

Farm 12.2.) 

Follow poles avoiding road to right just beyond. 

55.7 43.9 Turn left across iron bridge and right beyond. 

56.5 43.1 Curve left and right around small school on 

hillock to right. Avoid road to right 56.6 — • 

57.8. Go through irregular 4-corners 59.0. 

63.1 36.5 UPTON, church on right; keep slightly left. 

Cross R. R. 63.4 and switch at quarry 64.1, 
recrossing R. R. 65.3-66.5-68.3. 
69.7 29.9 BONNIEVILLE, 3-corners at station; straight 
through, crossing R. R. 71.5. Follow fair 
road, coming on old R. R. grade 73.5. Cross 
R. R. 74.2 and descend beyond. 

77.3 22.3 MUNFORDVILLE, Court House on left at 

4-corners. Straight through. 

77.4 22.2 End of road, water-tower on right; turn right, 

avoiding road to left just beyond. 

77.5 22.1 Fork; bear left downgrade. 

77.6 22.0 Cross long wood and iron bridge over Green 

River (toll 50c). At farther end 77.8, bear 
right upgrade, curving left around cliff on 
macadam into 

78.2 21.4 WOODSONVILLE, 3-corners; straight through. 

Go over R. R. bridge 79.6. 

79.7 19.9 ROWLETTS; straight through with poles. 

Ill 



85.5 14.1 HORSE CAVE; fork, bear right. Left leads 
to the business center. Follow pike across 
R. R. 87.3. 

89.3 10.3 5-corners; straight through with poles. 

89.5 10.1 CAVE CITY, large wood school on left; turn 

square right. Cross R. R. at station 89.7, 
continuing on good stone road. Go up long, 
winding grade over 2 miles. 

93.4 6.2 Fork; bear slightly left, going downgrade and 

curving left 95.2. Follow direct road over 
hilly country. Go down short, steep grade 
96.4 past church, school and cemetery 96.5. 
Avoid road to right 98.0 and road to left 98.2. 
Continue, winding through woods, across 
R. R. and bearing right along same 99.1. 
Cross another R. R. 99.6—99.8, keeping 
straight ahead past sawmill 99.9 to hotel 
entrance. 

99.6 0.0 Mammoth Cave. Mammoth Cave Hotel on 

left. 

ROUTE NO. 3— JACKSON HIGHWAY. 

(Via Bardstown and Mammoth Cave.) 

Bardstown is a city of 3,000 inhabitants, the county 
seat of Nelson county, and one of the oldest towns in the 
State. It is shown on Filson's Map of Kentucky aa 
"Beardstown." 

Points of interest are: St. Joseph's Cathedral, which 
contains numerous masterpieces of Old World paintings; 
Gethsemane Abbey, the home of the Trappist Monks in 
America; Nazareth Academy, a school for girls; "Federal 
Hill," where Stephen Foster wrote "My Old Kentucky 
Home," and many other fine old colonial homes. 

0.0 117.0 LOUISVILLE. Fourth and Walnut Streets. 

Seelbach Hotel. Go South on Fourth 

Street two blocks. 
0.3 116.7 Broadway and Fourth Street. Go east with 

trolley on Broadway; cross R. R. 1.5. 
2.0 115.0 At Cave Hill Cemetery jog slightly right and 

left on Cherokee Road. 

3.0 114.0 Castleman Monument, Cherokee Park on 

left; turn right on Cherokee Parkway to 
end of street. 

3.1 113.9 Bardstown Road; meeting trolley, turn left 

with same, going through 5-corners 4.3. 
4.8 112.2 Fork; bear right with trolley and marked 
poles, following trolley across R. R. At 
Buechel 7.7; straight through Fern Creek 
where trolley leaves 11.7. Follow heavy 
poles; pass cemetery (on right — 15.4) 
going down long, winding grade 16.4. 

114 



Caution for numerous sharp turns, going 
over Floyds Fork concrete bridge at foot 
of grade 17.3. 
17.8 99.2 Prominent fork; poles divide; bear right 
across small wooden bridge. Caution for 
sharp hairpin curve on upgradje 18.4. 
Follow poles on winding road. 

20.4 96.6 MT. WASHINGTON. Jog right and im- 

mediately left with poles and travel, going 
down long grade 20.8; ford small creek 21.7, 
straight through Smithville, 23.4. Curve 
right across long iron bridge over Salt 
River, 23.5, following poles on rough road 
over hilly country with numerous pretty 
views. Go up long winding grade 24.4; 
go between two churches at Riverview 

25.3, through High Grove 26.4. 

26.7 94.3 Fork; bear right through covered bridge. 

Caution for sharp turn on long, winding, 
steep upgrade 27.0. Continue ahead with 
poles on good stone pike; cross iron bridge 

31.4. Straight through 4-corners at Cox 
Creek 33.2. Go ahead with poles, passing 
Fair Grounds 37.0; cross R. R. at station 
38.9, straight ahead to Court House. 

39.5 77.5 BARDSTOWN. Open square. (Old Ken- 

tucky Home). Jog right and left one- 
quarter way around square, turning right. 

39.8 77.2 Fork; brick church on right. (This is the 

oldest church west of the Allegheny Moun- 
tains). Bear left with poles, running be- 
tween distilleries; go through covered 
wooden bridge 40.8, running upgrade 
beyond. Follow heavy poles on good 
stone on winding road over rolling country 
through BALLTOWN 45.4. Avoid road 
to left (leading to Gethsemane Abbey 
48.4); follow poles. 

53.8 63.2 NEW H.WEN. (Road to left leads to 

Gethsemane). Straight through, crossing 
R. R. 53.9; cross long iron bridge 54.5; 
cross R. R. at Athertonville 55.6 

56.9 60.1 Fork; bear left with poles and travel, using 

caution for steep, winding upgrade on 
Muldraugh's Hill (made famous by the 
bandit, Jesse James). 

61.2 55.8 Follow road leading to the right. 

62.4 54.6 Cross shallow ford and again at 62.6. 

63.0 54.0 Cross bridge and note short turn to the right. 

65.0 52.0 Cross wooden bridge and go up hill into 

65.8 51.2 HODGENVILLE. Court House on the 

left. Lincoln Monument on the right; up 
grade following good macadam road to 

68.9 48.1 ENTRANCE TO LINCOLN PARK. Turn 

right. 

115 



69.0 48.0 LINCOLN MEMORIAL (at entrance, 

straight ahead, taking first road to the left, 
is route to Mammoth Cave). 

69.1 47.9 Turn left on good Macadam road. 

71.5 45.5 BUFFALO. Turn right, straight through, 
running onto poor roads. Go through 
Magnolia 77.1, and passing church and 
cemetery at 77.3. 

77.4 39.6 Forlc; house in angle; bear left on poor, 
rough road, avoiding road to right 77.6. 
Straight through village of Pikeview 81.9. 
Pass school 82.1; follow poor, winding 
road, going down long, winding grade. 
Caution for sharp tiu-ns 86.3, running 
onto slightly better road. 

87.2 29.8 Cross long iron bridge over Green River 

(toll 40c), running onto good gravel, with 
many beautiful views of river 300 feet 
below in valley. Straight ahead on wind- 
ing road through Canmer 89.6. Picking 
up poles, follow same on good stone pike. 

92.3 24.7 HARDYVILLE. Straight through, avoiding 

road to left 92.4. Follow heavj' poles on 
winding road over slightly rolling country; 
pass brick school (on right— 96.4); straight 
through Uno 97.4. 
100.5 16.5 BEAR WALLOW. Fork; small red store 
on right. Bear right with poles straight 
through prominent 4-corners 103.3. Con- 
tinue with poles on winding road, turning 
left with road 105.8 and right 105.9, curving 
left past pond . 

106.5 10.5 Right-hand road, large school on left; turn 

right. 

106.6 10.4 CAVE CITY. Straight ahead across R. R. 

at station 106.7, continuing on good stone. 

Go up long, winding grade over 2 miles 

long 107.9. 

110.4 6.6 Fork; bear slightly left, going down grade 

and curving left 112.2. Continue over 

hilly country, going down short, steep 

grade 113.4; pass church, school and 

cemetery 113.5; avoid road to right 115.0, 

road to left 115.2 and road to right 115.3. 

Continue ahead, winding through woods 

across R. R. and bearing right along same 

116.1. Cross another R. R. 116.6—116.8, 

keeping ahead past sawmill 116.9 to hotel 

entrance. 

117.0 0.0 MAMMOTH CAVE. Mammoth Cave 

Hotel. 

There is another road to Bardstown via Taylorsville and 

Bloomfield, which is 54.7 miles. The road is longer and 

not so good, but furnishes a change of scenery. Road 

good to Fisherville, fair to Taylorsville, good to Bloomfield 

and good, with the exception of three miles to Bardstown, 

116 



ROUTE No. 4— Louisville to Shepherdsville, 20 Miles. 

Shepherdsville, the county seat of Bullitt county, is a 
village of 500 inhabitants, located on Salt River. It ie a 
very old town, and an attempt by a Congreasman from the 
district to secure an appropriation for making Salt River 
navigable to Shepherdsville led to his retirement, and 
originated the expression, applied to a defeated candidate, 
that he was "sent up Salt River." Paraquet Spring is 
located a short distance from the town. 

Road good to Bullitt county line— only fair gravel from 
that point. 
0.0 20.0 LOUISVILLE; Fourth and Broadway, east on 

Broadway to Third Street. 
0.1 19.9 Turn right on Third. 
1.3 18.7 Turn left on Burnett. 
1.8 18.2 Cross railroad and turn immediately right on 

Preston street with car hne. 
2.5 17.5 End of brick street, straight ahead with trolley. 

3.7 16.3 Cross trolley. 

3.8 16.2 Under raih-oad. 
4.0 16.0 Cross koUey, 

8.9 11.1 OKOLONA, end of trolley, straight ahead. • 
12.6 7.4 County line, good road to this point, straight 

ahead on winding road with poles. 
17.0 3.0 Cross iron bridge and pick up raihoad from 

right. 
18.0 2.0 GAP IN KNOBS. Turn right over railroad 

bearing left with same to 
20.0 .0 SHEPHERDSVILLE. Court House on left. 

ROUTE No. 5— Louisville to Elizabethtown via Shepherd»> 
villa 51.8 Miles. 

Elizabethtown, the county seat of Hardin county, is the 
largest town on the old L. & N. pike between Louiflville 
and Bowling Green. 

The records of the Lincoln family are on file at the 
Court House here, as what ie now Larue county was part 
of Hardin, in 1809. 

Elizabethtown is an important shipping point as two 
railroads pass through. White Mills, a well-known summer 
resort, is located on the Nolin River in the southern part 
of the county, and the automobile route to Dawson Springs 
passes through this city. 

With the improvement of Hardin county roads, some 
attractive country will be opened to motorists. 

Road good to Jefferson county line; poor gravel and dirt 
across Bullitt county; poor dirt to Boston; fair gravel to 
top of Muldraugh's Hill; fair macadam and gravel to 
Elizabethtown. 
20.0 31.8 SHEPHERDSVILLE; Court House on left. 

straight through. 
20,2 31.6 Cross Salt River bridge. 
20.5 31.3 Fork. Go straight ahead under raiboad, bear- 
ing right along raikoad, 

117 



20.6 31.2 SALT RIVER; Btation on right. 

20.8 31.0 Fork. Go right along railroad. 

23.9 27.9 BARDSTOWN JUNCTION; cross railroad 

three times to 
24.4 27.4 Fork; turn left and cross railroad. 
24.9 26.9 Fork; go right. 
27.0 24.8 Fork; go right to 
27.9 23.9 BELMONT; through short distance to 
28.0 23.8 Fork; take left, curving right on dirt road, 

fording creek, picking up railroad on right, 

leaving same to right and 

29.8 22.0 Go up very steep hill. 

32.6 19.2 Pass road to left, bearing right to railroad and 

turning left along railroad through winding 
narrow streets into 

33.2 18.6 LEBANON JUNCTION; turn left at main 

cross, go one block, turn left again, go one 
block and turn right on poor dirt road to 
35.4 16.4 Fork; go left over hills. 

36.4 15.4 Cross very rough ford, shortly picking up rail- 

road on right and follow to 

38.7 13.1 BOSTON; cross railroad, bear away from same 

to right. 

39.5 12.3 Pass road to left. 

40.7 11.1 Pass road to right. 

41.3 10.5 Cross iron bridge over Rolling Fork River. 

41.9 9.9 Fork; go left. 

42.8 9.0 Fork; avoid road to left; go right up hill nearly 

two miles long, shortly running onto good 

stone road after reaching summit of hill. 
47.2 4.6 Pass cemetery on left, straight ahead. 
50.0 1.8 Cross railroad; use caution; bear left along 

tracks, going into 
51.8 0.0 ELIZABETHTOWN; Court House directly in 

front, Main street to left. 



ROUTE No. 6— Louisville to Shelbyville, 30.5 Miles. 

Shelbyville, the county seat of Shelby county, is a thriv- 
ing city of 4,000 population, located near the center of the 
county. It is the third largest loose leaf tobacco market 
in the State. A new and very handsome Court House 
has just been completed. It is the home of Science Hill, 
a school for girls, which is known throughout the South. 
Shelby county has a large mileage of excellent macadam 
roads, and is probably more familiar to Louisville motorists 
than any county in the State, other than Jefferson. Road 
good. 
0.0 30.5 LOUISVILLE. Fourth and Broadway east on 

Broadway. 
1.2 29.3 Railroad crossing. 

1.7 28.8 Pass Cave Hill Cemetery ; bear right into Chero- 
kee Road. 
2.6 27.9 Circle monument, turn 90 degrees left into 

Cherokee Park. 
3.5 27.0 Pass road to right at fountain in park. 



118 



3.7 26.8 Turn right into Workhouse road at large dis- 
tillery; go up hill. 

6.0 24.5 Cross railroad, bear right on Shelbyville pike. 

6.1 24.4 ST. MATTHEWS, straight through. 

8.0 22.5 Cro.«s trolley, straight ahead, follow trolley, 

11.8 18.7 Trolley crossing. 

12.2 18.3 MIDDLETOWN, through. 

13.9 16.6 Trolley crossing. 
15.9 14 6 Floyd's Fork bridge. 

17.2 13.3 EASTWOOD, bear left. 

18.3 12.2 Cross iron bridge, Boston. 
19.0 11.5 Church on right. 

22.5 8.0 Double railroad crossing, dangerous. 

22.8 7.7 SIMPSONVILLE, straight through. 

29.4 1.1 Shelby County Fair on left. 
30.0 .5 Railroad crossing. 

30 5 .0 SHELBYVILLE. Court House on left. 



ROUTE No. 7— Louisville to Frankfort, via Shelbyville 
51 miles. 

Frankfort is the capita! of the State and the county seat 
of Franklin county. The capita! was established in Frank- 
fort in 1793, and seven buildings have been used. The 
old Capitol, built in 1828, is still standing, and in the stair- 
way has an architectural feature of note. The new Capitol 
is one of the most attractive buildings in the country. The 
Frankfort cemetery contains the tomb of Daniel Boone. 
The house is still standing in which Aaron Burr was tried 
for treason. The Penitentiary, the State Arsenal and the 
Colored State Normal are located here. 

Road good entire distance. 

30.5 20.5 SHELBYVILLE, Main street; Court House on 

left; straight through, crossing bridge at edge 
of town. 
31.2 19.8 Pass road to left (at top of hill pass Kentucky 
Old Mason's Home on left). Follow old 
State pike with main line of poles. 

36.6 14.4 CLAY VILLAGE; through. 

39.1 11.9 PEYTONIA; cross roads (left to Bagdad, right 
to Waddy); bear right beyond store, shortly 
going down hill, and follow small creek to 

42.8 8.2 GRAEFENBURG; through, bear left. 

43.1 7.9 Pass road to right just before crossing covered 

bridge. Follow main road. 
46.1 4.9 Cross iron bridge into BRIDGEPORT. 

49.9 1.1 Down long hill, with fine view of Kentucky 

State Capitol on right. 
50.6 .4 Turn to right on Second street. 
50.8 .2 Turn left on St. Clair street, crossing long iron 

bridge over Kentucky River. 
51 .0 FRANKFORT, Main and St. Clair streeta. 

ROUTE No. 8— Louisville to French Lick, via New Albany 
and the Paoli Pike, 58.3 IVIiles. 
This is a pike all the way, but rough in places. 

119 



0.0 5S.3 LOUISVILLE; Fourth and Broadway; west on 
Broadway to Twenty-sixth street. 

2.0 56.3 Turn right on Twenty-sixth street, go straight 
ahead. 

3.4 54.9 Portland avenue; turn left, going under railroad 
to 

3 6 54.7 Thirty-first street; turn right to 

3.8 54.5 K. & I. bridge (pay 23 cents for car and 5 cents 

for each person; get ticket); cross long bridge 
over Ohio River; give up ticket at end of 
bridge; cross two railroads at stations 
straight ahead to 

4.9 53.4 Spring and Vincennes streets; turn left on Spring 

street, with trolley. 
5.0 53.3 Cross railroad. 
5.9 52.4 NEW ALBANY, State and Spring streets. 

Court House on near left; turn right on State 

street with trolley. 
7.2 61.1 End of trolley; straight ahead, shortly going 

up long winding hill. 

10.2 48 1 MOORESVILLE; through; follow old pike, 

which is unmistakable. 
14.4 43.9 GALENA. 
15.7 42.6 Through two covered wooden bridges. 

17.7 40.6 GREENVILLE. 

24.3 34 PALMYRA; toll gate; pay 20 cents 

29.0 29.3 FREDERICKSBURG; through covered wooden 

bridge just bevond. 
34.2 24.1 HARDINSBURG. 
36 9 21.4 REGO. 

41.8 16.5 CHAMBERSBURG. 

46.6 11.7 Five points in edge of town; bear left into 

46.8 11.5 PAOLI; Court House directly in front. Jog 

half way round Court House and go out of 
town straight ahrad. 
48.0 10.3 Cross railroad and keep down valley. 

52.9 5 4 Covered wooden bridge. 

53.6 4.7 Cross iron bridge and another at 54.9. 

55.9 2.4 PROSPECT CORNERS; turn left at store 
through. 

56.2 2.1 Covered wooden bridge and cro^s railroad at 

end of bridge; caution; turn right with rail- 
road. 

56.7 1.6 WEST BADEN, main cross; turn right cross 

railroad to WEST BADEN HOTEL; bear 

left around hotel. 
56.9 1.4 Turn left around hill to 
57.6 .7 Cross roads at French Lick golf links; turn left 

across railroad crossing, again twice in going 

around station to 

58.3 .0 FRENCH LICK; hotel on left 



ROUTE No 9— Louisville to Indianapolis, via Seymour, 

125.9 Mi IPS. 

This is the shortest road between the two cities and is 

recommended during the summer when the roads are good. 

But as it contains some dirt road, it get.« bad in wet weather. 

120 



0.0 125.9 LOUISVILLE, Fourth and Broadway; west 
on Broadway to Twenty-sixth street. 

2.0 123.9 Turn right on Twenty-sixth street, straight 
ahead. 

3.4 122.5 Portland avenue, turn left, goinr; under rail- 

road. 

3.6 122.3 Thirty-first street; turn right to 

3.8 122.1 K. & I. bridge (pay 25 cents for car and 5 

cents per person; get ticket); cross long 
bridge over Ohio River; give up ticket at 
end of bridge; cross two railroads at sta- 
tion, straight ahead to 

4.9 121.0 NEW ALBANY. Spring and Vincennea 

streets; straight ahead. 

5.7 120.2 Five points at end of brick street; turn right 

with trolley 
8.3 117.6 Turn left on fine macadam, just after passing 
store on right. 

8.5 117.4 Turn right with macadam at school; follow 

main line of poles to 

12.1 113.8 HAMBURG; cross roads through. 

13.3 112.9 SELLERSBURG, pick up trolley from right, 
follow trolley. 

14.3 111.6 SPEEDS; through; cross iron bridge. 

14.7 111.2 Straight ahead; avoid road to right; jog along 
over railroad at next crossing; follow be- 
tween railroad and trolley to 

19.2 106.7 Turn right across railroad and immediately 

left around railroad station. 

19.4 106.5 MEMPHIS: follow railroad. 

20.9 lOi.O CANEY; turn to right away from railroad. 

22.9 103.0 Cross roads; turn left. 

23.7 102.2 HENRYVILLE; turn left ar>ros9 railroad at 
station and take first right at store. 

24.7 101.2 Turn right at Forest Reserve, away from rail- 
road; follow winding road to 

25.6 100.3 Cross roads; turn ieft. 

27.7 98.2 End of road; turn left to railroad and right 

along railroad to 
28.9 97.0 UNDERWOOD; turn right away from rail- 
road. 

29.5 964 Cross roads at top of hill; turn left on hill 

road to 

32.6 93 3 VIENNA; straight through. 

32.7 93.1 Turn left. 

33.1 92.8 SCOTTSBURG; Court Hou.<»e on right; turn 
right at Court House. 

33.8 92.1 Turn short to left. 
34.7 91.2 Pass road to right. 

37.6 88.3 Cross roads; straight ahead. 
40 6 85.3 Cross roads; turn "harp left. 
42.0 83.9 Cross roads; strai(!,ht ahead: cross iron bridge, 

bearing right up grade. 
42.4 83.1 Turn right. 
45.4 80.5 Cross roadi; turn to left 

46.3 79.6 Turn right at end of road. 

121 



47.0 78.9 Turn left. 
48.4 77.5 Turn right into 

48.6 77.3 CROTHERSVILLE; center; turn right and 
take first left at church. 

49.6 76.3 End of road; bear right. 
52 3 73.6 UNIONTOWN; through. 
59.0 66.9 End of road; turn right. 
59.9 66 Cross railroad and trolley. 

61.0 64.9 Cross roads; turn right and go straight, 

crossing railroad, to 

63.3 62.6 Second street; turn right to 

63.4 62.5 SEYMOUR, Second and Chestnut; straight 

ahead on Second street to 
63 6 62.3 Ewing avenue: turn left away from trolley. 

64.1 61.8 Cross railroad, follow poles to 

65.5 50 1 Cross road'?, turning left, crossing railroad. 

07.0 58.9 Turn right with poles again crossing railroad. 
71.9 54.0 Pass JONESBORO. to left on railroad. 

75.1 50 8 Turn right at school, through WAYNES- 

VILLE. 
76 2 49.7 Turn left to railroad, and turn right along 
tracks. 

77.8 48.1 Turn right away from railroad; bearing left 

into 
78.5 47 4 WALESBORO; through; pick up railroad on 

left. 
82 4 43.5 End of road; turn right across long iron bridge 

and railroad. 

82.9 43.0 Second and Washington streets; turn left. 

83.0 42.9 COLUMBUS: Court House on left; straight 

through business center on Washington 

83.2 42.7 Cross railroad. 

83.5 42.4 Turn left on Eighth street; cross railroad and 

bear right. 
83.9 42.0 Cross covered bridge, shortly getting back 
to trolley on right. 

85.3 40.6 Turn left away from trolley, taking first right, 

again picking up trolley on right and fol- 
lowing. 

89.7 36.2 Turn left away from trolley, taking first right, 

going through edge of 

90.4 35.5 TAYLORSVILLE; end of road just beyond; 

turn left, taking first right, 90.7; straight 
ahead. 

94.1 31.8 Turn right at large cemetery, taking first 

left, 94.2 through edge of 

94.6 31.3 EDINBURG. 

94.7 31.2 End of road: turn left, curving right across 

95.2 30.7 Long iron bridge at old mill. 
95.6 30.3 Fork; turn right; straight ahead. 

100.1 25.8 Cross trolley; through 

100.4 25..5 AMITY, again crossing trolley. 

104.9 21.0 Cross two railroads. 

105.0 20.9 Turn left at end of street, crossing railroad. 



122 



105.5 20.5 FRANKLIN; turn right at Court House, 
turn left around same; straight ahead, 
crossing railroad. 

105 7 20.2 Turn right at Walnut street, straight out of 
town. 

106.4 19.5 Pass reverse fork to right and pick up trolley 
following same. 

106.9 19.0 Cross trolley, follow through. 

110.9 15.0 WHITELAND; cross trolley just beyond, 
follow to 

117.4 8.5 GREENWOOD; through with trolley, cross- 
ing same just before reaching 

120.8 5.1 SOUTHPORT. 
121.3 4.6 EDGEWOOD. 

123.7 1.2 Five points in edge of city; bear right, crossing 
two railroads. 

125.9 0.0 INDIANAPOLIS, Madison street and Monu- 

ment Place. 



ROUTE NO. 10— Louisville to Springfield, via Bards- 
town, 58.7 Miles. 

Springfield is a town of 1,500 inhabitants, the county 
seat of Washington county and the center of a prosperous 
farming section. 

St Catherine Academy, a school for girls, is located 
on the Bardstown road, two miles from town. The Con- 
vent of St. Rose, one of the oldest institutions in the State, 
dating back more than one hundred years, is an attractive 
place. 

Leave Louisville on Route No. 1 to Bardstown 

39.5 19.4 BARDSTOWN. Court House directly in 

front; turn left 99 degrees on Market street 
(east) . 

38.6 19.3 Bear right and left down hill, turning right at 

foot across bridge. 

39.8 19.1 Fork, turn right, go up long hill passing Federal 

Hill on right near summit. 

45.4 13.5 Pass fork on right and bear left through. 

45.5 13.4 BOTLAND, shortly going down long hill with 

attractive views to left. 
48.4 10.5 Cross iron bridge over Beech Fork, bearing 

left into 
49.0 9.9 FREDERICKSTOWN. Turn left between 

stores, with main travel, follow creek bottom. 

55.7 2.2 Pass St. Catherine school on right. 

57.9 1.0 Pass reverse fork on left (to Bloomfield). 

68.2 .7 Railroad crossing shortly crossing iron bridge, 
passing tobacco warehouse into 

58.9 .0 SPRINGFIELD. Main street. Court House 
on left. 



ROUTE NO. 11— Louisville to Taylorsville. 32.8 Miles. 

Taylorsville the county ceat of Spencer county, ia a 
town of 800 population, located at the junction of Brashears 
Creek with Salt River. The roads of the county are only 
fair. 

123 



Road good to Fiflherville, but only fair the remainder 
of the trip, 
0.0 32.8 LOUISVILLE. Fourth and Broadway, east 

on Broadway. 
L2 3L6 Railroad crossing. 
1.7 31.1 Cave HiU, bear right into Cherokee Road. 

2.7 30.1 Circle Monument. Turn right on Cherokee 

Parkway, then left on Bardstown Road with 
trolley. 
4.5 2S.3 Cross trolley, fork, take left, follow trolley on 
left. 

6.8 26.0 Cross trolley. 
7.1 25.7 Cross trolley. 

7.7 25. 1 Pass road each way, store on right. 
10.8 22.0 Cross railroad. 

11.2 21.6 Cross trolley. 

11.6 21.2 JEFFERSONTOWN, public square, turn left 

taking tirst right at church. Pass numerous 
diverging roads, follow main road. 

14.7 18.1 Pass road on right. Store on left. 

16.3 16.5 Cross iron bridge, road to right. 

17.7 15.1 FISHER\aLLE, through bearing right. 

17.8 15.0 Iron bridge over Floyd's Fork, bear left. 
18.6 14.2 Fork, bear right up hill. 

23.8 9.0 WILSONVILLE, Through. 

26.5 6.3 Cross wooden bridge to end of road, turn right 

through town of ELK CREEK, follow creek 
short distance, leave creek to right, go up 
sharp hill, follow main road over rolling 
country. 

31.6 1.2 Spencer County Fair on right. Road bears 

right with creek, later turns to left. 
32.5 .3 Cross iron bridge into 
32.8 .0 TAYLORSVILLE, Court House on left. 



ROUTE NO. 12— Louisville to West Point 20.5 Miles. 
West Point is a town of near 1 000 population in Hardin 
county at the junction of Salt River with the Ohio. The 
hill above the town to the east is the site of Fort Hill, 
fortified during the Civil War to command the Ohio River. 
The town has been practically cut off from Louisville 
until recently, when the new Hardin-Jefferson bridge 
was completed. The drive from the town to summit of 
Muldraugh's Hill is one of the most attractive around 
Louisville. Road good. 

0.0 20.5 LOUISVILLE, Fourth and Broadway, south 
on Fourth street. 
.7 19.8 Fourth and Oak streets. Turn right on Oak. 
1.0 19.5 Seventh and Oak streets. Then left on Seventh 

street. 
1.4 19.1 Cross raib-oad. 
1.9 18.6 Cross raih-oad. 

2.2 18.3 Pass Avery's on left. 

4.3 16.2 Cross railroad and pass road on left. 

4.4 16.1 Cross railroad and pass Jefferson County 

Asylum on left. 

124 



4.8 15.7 ST. HELEN'S, Dixie Highway on right, bear 
left with same, picking up trolley from 
right, follow trolley. 

6.7 13.8 Cross trolley , 

7.8 12.7 Cross trolley. 

8.6 11.9 PLEASURE RIDGE. Road left to Iroquois 

Hark 

9.7 10 8 Waverly Hills Sanitorium on hills to left. 

11.5 9.0 VALLEY STATION, with trolley through. 

13.6 6.9 ORELL. end of trolley. 
13.8 6.7 Road forks, turn right. 

17.0 3.5 KOSMOSDALE, through. 

18.1 2.4 Turn left, cross railroad and turn right with 

railroad. 

20.2 .3 Long bridge over Salt River. 

20.5 .0 WEST POINT, cross raib-oad station on left. 



ROUTE NO. 13— Louisville to Harrodsburg and Graham 

Springs via Shelbyville and Lawrenceburg 74.7 Miles. 

Harrodsburg, the county seat of Mercer county, is an 
oljl and attractive city of 3,500 people, with excellent roads 
radiating from it in all directions. Graham Springs, 
located on the heights overlooking the city, is one of the 
best-known medicinal springs in the State, and was for- 
merly owned by the United States government, there 
being located here a hospital for soldiers. A fine hotel 
at the springs caters particularly to motor tourists, and 
affords excellent accommodations. The Historical So- 
ciety has many valuable manuscripts and relics among 
them being the old Lincoln cabin built from the logs of 
the home occupied by the Lincoln family in Washington 
county. 

Lawrenceburg, the county seat of Anderson county, is a 
city of 2,000 population, and a very attractive residence 
town. The streets are wide and beautifully shaded and 
the roads of the county are fair. Kentucky River is the 
eastern line of the county. 

Road good except a few rough places. 

Leave Louisville on Route No. 6 to Shelbyville. 

30.5 24.7 SHELBYVILLE; Court House on left; straight 

ahead, crossing bridge at edge of town. 
31.2 24 Pass road to left; follow old State Pike with 
main line of poles. 

36.6 18.6 CLAY VILLAGE; through. 

39.1 16.1 PEYTONIA; cross roads; bear right beyond 

store, shortly gomg down hill and follow 

small creek to 
42.8 12.4 GRAEFENBURG: through. 
43.0 12.2 Turn to right between church on right and 

bridge; follow winding road with poles. 
46.4 8.8 Pass road to right. 
50 7 4.5 ALTON; through. (Reverse fork in north 

edge of town is good road to Frankfort.) 

51.4 3.8 Pass church on left. 

53.5 1.7 Pass reverse fork on left. 

64.7 .5 Raikoad crossing; straight ahead into 

125 



55.2 .0 LAWRENCEBURG; Court House on left. 
(The second street to left north of the Court 
House is the road to Versailles, crossing 
• Kentucky River at Tyrone on ferry.) 

55.2 19.5 LAWRENCEBURG; Court House on left; 

straight ahead on good plain road. 
56.0 18.7 Pass cemetery on right. 
56.5 18 2 Cross railroad. 

57.2 17.5 SPRINGVILLE; through. 

63.7 11.0 SALVIS.'^; through; follow old State Pike. 

which 5s unmistakable. 

73.8 .9 Pass reverse fork on left, which is confusing 

when going in opposite direftions. 

74.3 .4 Cross railroad; take first left on Lexington 

street, go two blocks and turn right up hill to 
74.7 .0 HARRODSBURG, Main street; Court House 
on right. (To reach Graham Springs, go 
straisht ahead to end of street, turn right 
two blocks, turn left up hill; hotel on right. 
Ben C. AUin, Mgr.) 



ROUTE No. 14— Louisville to Madison, Ind., on the North 

Side of the River, 57.4 Miles. 

Madison is an attractive city of 6,000 population, the 

county seat of Jefferson county, and the site of the Indiana 

Hospital for the insane. The roads are fair through the 

county, with most attractive views of the Ohio River from 

the bluffs north of the town. The road from Louisville 

is fair, with the exception of a few miles on either side of 

Lexington, Scott county. 

0.0 Louisville, Fourth and Broadway; west on Broadway 

to Twenty-sixth street. 
2.0 Turn right on Twenty-sixth street, straight ahead. 
3.4 Portland avenue, turn left, going under raihroad. 

3.6 Thirty-first street; turn right to 

3.8 K. & L Bridge (pay 25 cents for car and 5 cents per 

person; get ticket); cross long bridge over Ohio 
River; give up ticket at end of bridge; cross two 
railroads at station, straight ahead to 

4.9 NEW ALBANY, Spring and Vincennes streets; 

straight ahead. 

5.7 Five points at end of brick street; turn right with 

trolley. 
8 3 Turn left on fine macadam, just after passing store 

on right. 
8.0 Turn right with macadam at school; follow main 

line of poles to 
12.1 HAMBURG: cross roads, through 
13.3 SELLERSBURG; pick up trolley from right, follow 

trolley. 
14.3 SPEEDS; through; cross iron bridge. 
14.7 Straight ahead; avoid road to right; jog right over 

railroad at next crossing; follow between railroad 

and trolley. 

126 



19.2 Turn right across railroad and immediately left around 
railroad station. 

19.4 MEMPHIS; follow railroad. 

20.9 CANEY; turn to right away from railroad. 

22.9 Cross roads; turn left. 

23.7 HENRYVILLE; turn left across railroad at station 

and take first right at store. 
24.7 Turn right at Forest Reserve, away from railroad; 
follow winding road to 

25.6 Cross roads; turn left. 

27.7 End of road; turn left to railroad and right along 

railroad to 
28.9 UNDERWOOD: turn right away from railroad. 

29.5 Cross roads at top of hill; turn left on hill road to 

32.6 VIENNA; main cross; turn right (east), passing 

school on right. 

33.7 Cross roads; straight ahead, pass cemeteries, 34.0, 

36.8 and 39.7; following telephone poles all the 
way to 

40.2 LEXINGTON; large school on right; turn right 

around school on Main street, to first left. 

40.3 Turn left, bearing immediately right down hill. 
40.6 Cross railroad, follow poles on poor macadam to 

50.8 HANOVER; turn left in front of brick store (straight 

ahead to Hanover College and landing); follow 

poles to stone road. 
54.5 Down long winding hill with fine views of river to 

right. 
56.5 Cross railroad on Main street, pick up trolley. 

57.4 MADISON; Court House on right (straight ahead 

up river to Brooksburg and Vevay.) 



ROUTE No. 15— Frankfort to Lexington via Versailles 
and Old State Pike. 

Lexington is a city of 35,000 population, the county seat 
of Fayette county, and the center of the famous "Blue- 
grass Country." 

The Kentucky State University and the State Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College are located here. It is one of 
the principal horse markets in the country, and the trotting 
races every fall draw large crowds from all over the United 
States. It is also a large tobacco market, the "Bluegrass 
Country" growing a high grade of burley tobacco. 

Fine roads radiate from the city in all directions, and 
beautiful country homes adorn every section. Some of the 
best known of these are "Ashland," the former home of 
Henry Clay, which is located a short distance from the 
city on the R,ichmond Pike; "Elmendorf." with its ten 
thousand acres, seven mile; north of the city on the old 
State pike; "Woodiawn." fifteen miles north of the city, 
the home of "Maud S.," and "Poplar Hill/' the home of 
"Nancy Hanks." Many others a= attractive are found in 
all directions. 



127 



This is the old State pike from Louisville to Lexington, 
and is the route usually taken by motorists. Road good 
the entire distance. 

Leave Louisville by Route No. 1 to Shelbyville, going 
straight through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort., 
0.0 28.5 Frankfort, corner Main and St. Clair streets; 
turn right on Main street, follow trolley to 
Lexington. (State Arsenal on right, Peni- 
tentiary on left, under hill.) 
0.7 27.8 Pass large cemetery on right (burial place of 

Daniel Boone.) 
2.4 26.1 Fork; turn right with trolley. 
3.7 24.8 Fork; bear right with trolley, shortly crossing 

same. 
4.0 24.5 Over railroad. 

4.7 23.8 JETT; follow trolley. 

5.8 22.7 Pass road to left (Shady Lane to Lexington); 

keep straight ahead with trolley. 
14.0 14.5 Pass road on left (to Midway). 

15.0 13.5 Fork; bear right pass stand-pipe. 

15.2 13.2 VERSAILLES; Court House on far right; turn 
left with trolley. 

16.1 12.4 Cross railroad. 

21.1 7.4 FORT SPRING. 

27.2 1.3 Cross two railroads on High street. 

27.5 1.0 Bear 45 degrees right on to Maxwell street. 
27.9 .6 Turn left at trolley on Broadway. 

28.3 .2 Cross raih-oad and turn right on Main street. 
28.5 .0 LEXINGTON; Court House on left. 



ROUTE No. 16— Frankfort to Lexington via Lexington Pike. 

This is an attractive road, good the entire distance through 
"Shady Lane," making it very delightful for midsummer 
touring. 

Leave Louisville by Route No. 1 to Shelbyville, going 

straight through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort. 

0.0 25.1 FRANKFORT, corner Main and St. Clair 

streets, turn right on Main street, following 

trolley up hill out of city. (State Arsenal 

on right. Penitentiary on left under hill.) 

0.7 24.4 Pass large cemetery on right. (Burial place of 

Daniel Boone.) 
2.4 22.7 Fork; turn right with trolley. 
3.7 21.4 Fork; bear right with trolley (left to Midway 

and Lexington), shortly crossing trolley. 
4.0 21.1 Cross railroad. 

4.7 20.4 JETT; follow trolley. 

5.8 19.3 Fork; turn sharp left away from trolley (straight 

ahead to Versailles). 
7.0 18.1 Pass store on right, cross railroad, bear right, 
follow good road over attractive country. 

128 



7.9 17.2 Pick up railroad from right pass diverging 
roads, keep straight ahead. (Pass the Alex- 
ander Stock Farm, home of Longfellow, the 
famous race horse, on right.) 

12.6 12.5 Cross roads; straight ahead (right to Ver- 

sailles, left to Midway.) 
12.9 12.2 Cross raih-oad; WALLACE; straight ahead on 
fine road. 

23.7 1.4 Pass large distillery on right on Manchester 

23.9 1.2 Under railroad. 

24.3 .8 Turn left on Cox street; cross two raib-oads up 

grade. 

24.4 .7 Turn right on Main street, with trolley. 
25.1 .0 LEXINGTON: Court House on left. 



ROUTE No. 17— Lexington to Maysville. 

Maysville, the county seat of Mason coimty, is located 
on the Ohio River at the mouth of Limestone Creek, and 
was the northern terminus of an Indian trail that touched 
Blue Lick Springs and passed through Lexington and south 
to the Indian settlements in Tennessee. 

This trail road afterward grew into the State pike from 
Lexington to the Ohio, which follows practically the same 
route to the Salt Licks of Fleming county. 

Maysville is an enterprising city of 7,5(X) population, 
has beautiful streets and the drives south from the city over 
the hills afford excellent scenery. 

Road is good the entire distance, except where the old 
State pike has been neglected in Nicholas and Fleming 
counties. 

Leave Louisville by Route No. 1 to Shelbyville, going 
straight through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort, thence by 
either Route Nos. 15 or 16 to Lexington. 
0.0 62.5 LEXINGTON; Court House on left; straight 

ahead to Limestone street. 
0.1 62.4 Turn left (north) on Limestone with trolley 

and follow same to Paris. 
1.2 61.3 Cross raiboad. 

3.4 59.1 Caution for sharp t;irn under raih*oad. 
4.1 48.4 Lexington Country Club on right. 
6.6 55.9 ELMENDORF, straight ahead. 
16.1 46.4 Pass Bourbon County Fair Grounds on right. 
16.7 45.8 Cross raih-oad. 
17.1 45.4 Trolley leaves to left, straight ahead. 

17.7 44.8 PARIS; Court House on left; straight ahead, 

bearing right through 

17.8 44.7 Covered wooden bridge. 
18.1 44.4 Pass large distiller>-. 

18.5 44.0 Pass road on right, which goes to Mt. Sterling; 

pick up railroad. 
23.3 39.2 Cross railroad. 

129 



25.4 37.1 Cross railroad. 

26.5 36.0 Cross railroad and iron bridge, bearing left into 
26.9 35.6 MILLERSBURG. public square on right. 

Through, follow old State pike, which is un- 
mistakable. 

31.7 30.8 Fork, keep straight ahead. Road to right with 

poles goes to Carlisle. 

33.5 29.0 OAKLAND MILLS, through to 

34.8 27.7 ELLISVILLE, through 

35.6 26.9 Covered bridge. 

36.6 25.6 Covered bridge. 

38.0 24.5 Cross long iron bridge over Licking River into 

38.1 24.4 BLUE LICK SPRINGS, through, using caution 

for sharp curve. 

43.7 18.8 FAIRVIEW, through. 
45.4 17.1 Covered wooden bridge. 
50.0 12.0 MAYSLICK, through. 

55.0 7.5 Through covered bridge bearing left past 

Pyles stores. 
58.7 3.8 WASHINGTON, through, shortly going down 
long hill with several sharp turns. 

61.9 .6 Fork, bear left. 

62.1 .4 End of street. Turn right on Third street. 

62.4 .1 Third and Market streets. Turn left to 

62.5 .0 MAYSVILLE. straight ahead to ferry. 



ROUTE No. 18— Lexington to Winchester. 

Winchester, the county seat of Clark county, is a city on 
8,000 population, and the largest with one exception if 
the Bluegrass. It is known as the "Gateway to the Moun- 
tains." Clark county compares favorably with any other 
county in the state in its wealth of beautiful country 
homes, and the excellence of its roads. The best road to 
Boonesboro is from Winchester. It has some of the finest 
churches, and boasts the largest Sunday School in the State. 
Tourists will find excellent hotel accommodations. 
Road good the entire distance. 

Leave Louisville on Route No. 1 to Shelbjnnlle, straight 
through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort, there taking Route 
No. 15 to Lexington. 

0.0 18.4 LEXINGTON, Main street. Court House on 
left. Go straight ahead on Main street to 
0.1 18.3 Limestone street, turn left with trolley to 
0.4 18.0 East Third and Limestone streets. Turn right 

on Third Street. 
0.7 17.7 Cross railroad. 

1.1 17.3 Cross railroad, pass end of asphalt. 

1.2 17.2 Cross railroad and bear left passing L. & E. 

shops on left, pass numerous diverging roads, 
but to follow good wide road straight ahead 
over beautiful country with numerous hand- 
some country homes. Pick up high tension 
power line on left. 



130 



7.8 10.6 Cross road, straight ahead. 

8.5 9.9 Pass church on left. 
12.8 5.6 Pass Watson's store. 

17.8 .6 Cross raih-oad. 

18.4 .0 WINCHESTER. Lexington avenue and Mali 
street. Turn left one block to Court House 
(Straight ahead past Court House on Mair 
street leads to Paris, Mt. Sterling, or Indiaii 
Fields; turn right at Main and Lexington 
go two blocks and turn right again at large 
church is the road to Boonesboro and Rich- 
mond.) 

ROUTE No. 19— Winchester to Mt. Sterling . 

Road good the entire distance. Leave Louisville via 

Route No. 1 to Shelbyville, straight through on Route No 

7 to Frankfort, there taking Route No. 15 to Lexington. 

From Lexington take Route No. 18 to Winchester 

0.0 15.3 WINCHESTER. Corner Main street and 

Lexington avenue. (Court House one block 

to left.) Turn left (north) on Main street. 

0.3 15.0 Cross two railroads straight ahead, cross bridge 

over railroad to 
0.7 14.6 Fork in edge of town; turn right (straight ahead 

to Paris 15.7 miles) over hill road. 
6.0 9.3 Pass Tanner's store and covered wooden bridge 

7.6 7.7 Covered wooden bridge. 

8.6 6.7 Shallow ford and road to left. 

10.2 5.1 Pass store and blacksmith shop. 
12.6 2.7 Double curve up hill. 

15.3 .0 MT. STERLING. Court House on left 

(Straight ahead to Olympian Springs, left at 
Court House to Maysville.) 

ROUTE No. 20— Mt. Sterling to Olympian Springs. 

Road good to Mt. Sterling, but rough from that point tc 
Olympian Springs. 

Leave Louisville on Route No. 1 to Shelbyville, straight 
through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort, there take Route 
No. 15 to Lexington, from that point take Route No. IS 
to Winchester, and Route No. 19 to Mt. Sterling. 
0.0 19.9 MT. STERLING. Court House on left, straight 

through, cross railroad just beyond. 
3.0 16.9 Turn right just before reaching railroad (left 

across railroad to Owingsville.) 
3.3 16.6 Turn right and follow main road over hilij 
with numerous sharp turns. 

9.2 10.7 Rough hill with sharp turn to left at foot of 

hill; follow creek to 

9.3 10.6 Turn right up long hill 

12.0 7.9 Cross small wooden bridge, and go up long hill 

13.9 6.0 PRESTON, through, bear right just beyond 

follow main road to 
17.9 2.0 OLYMPIA, through, cross railroad. 
9.9 .0 OLYMPIAN SPRINGS HOTEL. 

131 



ROUTE No. 21— Frankfort to Georgetown. 

Georgetown, the county seat of Scott county, is a city 
of 2,500 population, located on the Elkhorn in the very 
prosperous "Bluegrass Country." The well-known George- 
town College, a Baptist school, is located here. The 
Indian Refining Company operate a large plant at this 
point, employing a number of persons. A trolley line con- 
nects this city with Lexington, following the pike the en- 
tire distance. 

Road good the entire distance. Leave Louisvil' e on Route 
No. 1 to Shelbyville; straight through on Route No. 7 to 
Frankfort. 

0.0 18.0 FRANKFORT. Main and St. Clair streets; 
east on Main street up-grade out of city with 
trolley; pass State Arsenal on right and State 
Penitentiary under hill to left. 
0.7 17.3 Pass large cemetery on right (burial place of 
Daniel Boone); pass large school on left 
(Colored State Normal). 

2.4 15.6 Fork, bear left away from trolley (right is 

Route No. 15 to Lexington). 
3.7 14.3 Pass large distillery in creek bottom to left. 

4.5 13.5 FORKS OF ELKHORN; cross covered wooden 

bridge, cross road just beyond, straight ahead 
circhng around hill; follow main road with 
heavy poles to 
7.0 11.0 WOOD LAKE: through. 
9.9 8.1 WHITE SULPHUR; through. 
15.1 2.9 Cross iron bridge; pass road on right (to Mid- 
way); Elkhorn Creek on left. 
18.0 .0 GEORGETOWN; Court House on left. 



ROUTE No. 22— Lexington to Danville. 

Road good the entire distance. Leave Louisville on Route 
No. 1 to Shelbyville, straight through on Route No. 7 to 
Frankfort. Frankfort take Route No. 15 to Lexington. 
Where the turn 's made in Lexington from Maxwell street 
to Broadway go right instead of left, as to go to the center 
of the city and proceed out the Harrodsburg pike. For 
convenience on other routes, this logging will show from the 
Court House and the previous route will be No. 15. 
0.0 37 4 LEXINGTON, Court House, go west on Main 

street. 
0.1 37.3 Turn left on Broadway with trolley, crossing 

railroad. 
0.6 36.8 Cross railroad. 
0.8 36.6 Cross railroad. 
1.1 36.3 End of car line at Trotting Track. Go straight 

ahead, avoiding left hand road at 81.4. 
6.1 31.3 Fork (Elkhorn). Take left with poles (road to 
right is Keene pike to Troy and Mundy's 
Ferry) 
10,8 26.6 NEALTON, cross railroad. 

132 



11.4 26.0 Pass road to right. 

11.5 25.9 Pass road to left. 
13.7 23.7 Pass road to left. 

14.3 23.1 Fork, bear right away from telephone poles. 

15.2 22.2 Pass road to right. 

16.5 20.9 Pass road to left. 

17.2 20.2 Pass road to right. Go down long winding hill, 
using caution for sharp turns to 

18.2 19.2 BROOKLYN BRIDGE, cross Kentucky River 
Up long winding hill. Views of High Bridg( 
to left from summit. 

24.2 13.2 SHAKERTOWN (historic home of the Shakei 
colony in Kentucky). Visitors will be al 
lowed to go through certain of the building! 
by applying to the superintendent, whose 
home is large building with porch, well bad 
on lawn on right side of road, near center o 
colony. Turn to left on fine road. 

28.0 9.4 Cross railroad. 

29.0 8.4 Pass road to left, which would be confusing ir 
the reverse direction. 

29.5 7.9 Jog left through four corners in edge of BURGIN 

34.0 3.4 Covered wooden bridge. 

36.8 .6 Pass road to left (avoid in reversing) curvinj 
right into Third street. 

37.4 .0 DANVILLE, Third and Main streets. Couri 
House on right. 



ROUTE No. 2a— Georgetown to Cincinnati. 

Leave Louisville on Route No. 1 to Shelbjrville, go 
straight through on Route No. 7 to Frankfort; east on Main 
street on Route No. 21 to Georgetown; turn north at 
Georgetown between hotel and Court House. Road good 
entire distance with the exception of a few miles in Grant 
county on either side of Williamstown. 
0.0 71.5 GEORGETOWN. North, passing Court 

House on right. 
0.4 71.1 Railroad crossing. 
0.7 70.8 Covered wooden bridge. 
3.7 67.8 Covered wooden bridge, pass roads right and 

left, but follow main road with poles. 
4.6 56.9 Covered wooden bridge. Numerous hog backs 
through this section, and covered bridges 
every few miles to 
22.4 49.1 End of road, bear left with poles to 
22.8 48.7 CORINTH. Straight ahead, bear right at 
fork in edge of town, road keeps in sight of 
railroad almost to Cincinnati. 
23.7 47.8 Cross bridge over railroad. 
25.0 36.5 BLANCHETT. Pass station on left, follow 
railroad crossing same at grade or overhead 
five times in the next five miles to 



133 



29.5 42.0 MASON. Pass depot at fight. 

31.2 40.3 Fork, turfl right over railroad, follow same 

crossing again over bridge and at grade jiist 

before reaching 
34.5 37.0 WILLIAMSTOWN. Court House on left, bear 

left along railroad 

37.4 34.1 Cross railroad. 

38.2 33.3 DRY RIDGE. Road forks go right past 
stores, cross railroad four times before reaching 

42.1 29.4 SHERMAN. Station on right, follow railroad, 

crossing four times before reaching 

45.5 26.0 CRITTENDEN, through, follow railroad, 

crossing over once to 

46.5 25.0 Toll gate (pay 20 cents, get ticket), cross rail- 

road at grade four times before reaching 
48.9 22.6 BRACHT. Depot on left, follow poles to next 

51.2 20.3 Toll gate (give up ticket), turning left and re- 

turning to raiboad, crossing over on bridge to 

52.2 19.3 WALTON, through, crossing raihroad twice at 

grade to next. 
53 6 17.9 Toll gate (pay 15 cents), curve right and left 
over railroad bridge to 

54.3 17.2 KENSINGTON, through, cross railroad once 

at grade before reaching 

55.6 15.9 RICHWOOD. Depot on right, through, pass 

Fair Grounds to 

61.0 10.5 Fork in ede:e of town, bear right through 

61.1 10 4 FLORENCE, straight ahead to 

62.7 8.8 Toll gate (pay 10 cents) in edge of 

62.9 8.6 ERLANGER, straight through, crossing rail- 
road and picking up trolley on left. 

67.7 3.8 Toll gate (pay 15 cents), go down long hill 
overlooking Ohio River and cities of Cin- 
cinnati and Covington. 

69.2 2.3 Pick up trolley from left, follow same on Pike 

70.1 1.4 COVINGTON. Pike and Madison streets, 
turn left with trolley, go two blocks to Fourth 
street, turn right one block to Court street, 
turn left between Court House and City 
Hall, straight ahead to 

70.6 .9 Toll gate at end of bridge (pay 15 cents), cross 
bridge over Ohio River, straight ahead to 

71.1 .4 End of street, turn left, taking first right at 
Vine street. 

71.5 .0 CINCINNATI. Fifth and Vine. Fountain 
Square. 



ROUTE No. 24— Louisville to Nashville, via Bardstown, 
Buffalo, Cave City, Gallatin. 

Road good to Bardstown, fair to Gallatin, excepting 
the last twenty-two miles in Kentucky. Balance is good 
macadam. Leave Louisville on Route No. 6. 



134 



40.8 BARDSTOWN. Turn right into Market streel 
at Court House and keep straight ahead. 

43.2 Through covered bridge. 

58.3 NEW HAVEN. Straight through. 
59.0 Cross river bridge. 

60.6 ATHERTONVILLE. Cross railroad. Straighi 
ahead. 

66.3 Take left fork. 

70.4 Straight through cross roads. 
71.3 Straight through cross roads. 
72.0 Ford creek. Deep and narrow. 

73.2 BUFFALO. Straight through. The Lincoh 

cabin, birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, two miles 
to right of this place. Good roads. 
"^9.0 MAGNOLIA. Straight through. 

79.6 At white church take right fork. 

79.7 Take left fork. 

84.6 PARKVIEW. Straight through. 

90.3 GREEN RIVER. Toll bridge (40 cents). 
93.0 CANMER. Straight through. 

98.0 HARDYVILLE. Bear right and keep straighi 

ahead. 
98.0 Straight through cross roads. 
101.5 UNO. Straight through. 
105.2 BEAR WALLOW. Take right fork down hill 

Follow wires. 
108.2 Turn left at cross roads, leaving poles. 
109.1 Turn left into single road at blacksmith shop. 

111.1 Turn right into main road at schoolhouse. Follovi 

wires to 

125.2 GLASGOW. Turn left one block. At Court Hous( 

turn right into Green street and keep straight. 
133.9 LUCAS. Straight through. 
136.5 PAGEVILLE. Straight through. 

138.4 Cross river bridge. 

142.2 CEDAR SPRINGS. Straight through. 

149.5 Cross railroad and go straight to Court House. 
•150.2 SCOTTSVILLE. Bear right and left around Court 

House and go straight. 

154.2 Cross raih-oad. 

156.3 Cross iron bridge. Go under railroad. 

157.1 PETROLEUM. Straight through. Cross railroad 
157.5 Cross iron bridge. 
158.1 Cross raiboad. 

135 



160.4 ADOLPHUS, KY. Straight through. 
160.8 Ford creek. 

162.2 SUGAR GROVE, TENN. Straight through. 

163.5 TURNER STATION. Straight through. 

164.3 Ford creek. 

167.5 At end of road, take right fork. 
168.2 Take left fork down hill. 

172.4 BRADSFORD. Straight through. 
175.4 BETHPAGE. Straight through. 

178.6 Straight through cross roads. 
180.0 . SIDEVIEW. Straight through. 
186.4 GALLATIN. Straight through. 
186.8 Cross raib-oad. 

191.4 Cross iron bridge and trolley. 

192.2 Avoid all right forks and follow trolley straight. 

192.7 Cross raihoad. 

194.4 Avondale. Cross raiboad. Straight ahead. P'ollow 

trolley. 
198.6 HENDERSONVILLE. Straight through. 

200.3 Cross bridge over railroad. Ford creek. 

201.5 Cross concrete bridge. 

206.3 Cross raib-oad. Keep straight on Eleventh street. 

213.3 Bear right with trolley into Woodland street. 
Cross river bridge. Straight into Bridge avenue 
(which is a continuation of Woodland St.) to 
Court House. 

215.2 NASHVILLE. 



136 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE— 1828-1916 









Popular 
Vote 


Elec- 


Year 


Candidate 


Party 


toral 


1828 


Jackson 


. Democrat 


.. 647,231 


178 




Adams 


..Federal 


.. 509,097 


83 


1832 


Jackson 


..Democrat 


.. 687,502 


219 




Clay 


..Whig 


.. 530,189 


49 




Floyd 


..Whig 




11 




Wirt 

VanBuren 


..Anti-M 


.. 33,108 


7 


1836 


. Democrat 


.. 761,549 


170 




Harrison 


. Whig 




73 




White 


-Whig 




26 




Webster 


..Whig 


.. 736,656 


14 




Mangum 


-Whig 




11 


1840 


VanBuren 


.-Democrat 


,..1,128,702 


60 




Harrison 


..Whig 


..1,275,017 


234 




Birney 


..Liberty. 


.. 7,059 




1844 


Polk 


..Democrat 


..1,337,243 


170 




Clay 


.-Whig 


...1,299,068 


105 




Birney 


..Liberty 


... 62,300 




1848 


Taylor 


-Whig... 


...1,360,101 


163 




Cass... 


..Democrat 


...1,220,544 


107 




VanBuren... 


..Free Soil 


.. 291,263 




1852 


Pierce .. 


..Democrat 


...1,601,474 


254 




Scott 


..Whig 


...1,380,678 


42 




Hale 


..Free Soil 


... 156,149 




1856 


Buchanan 


. Democrat 


...1,838,169 


174 




Fremont 


..Republican 


...1,341,264 


114 




Fillmore 


..American 


... 874,534 


8 


1860 


Douglas 


..Democrat 


...1,375,157 


12 




Breckeuridge. 


..Democrat 


.. 845,763 


72 




Lincoln 


..Republican 


...1,866,352 


180 




Bell 


. Union- 


... 589,581 


39 


1864 


McClellan... 


..Democrat 


— 1,808,725^ 


21 




Lincoln 


..Republican 


...2,216,067 


216 


1868 


Seymour 


..Democrat 


...2,709,613 


80 




Grant 


..RepubUcan 


...3,015,071 


214 


1872 


Greeley 


..Democrat 


...•2,834,079 


*66 




O'Conor 


..Ind. Dem 


-. 29,408 






Grant 


..Republican.... 


.-3,597,070 


292 




Black 


..Temperance... 


5,608 




1876 


Tilden.. 


.-Democrat 


. 4,284,885 


184 




Hayes 


.-Republican 


—4,033,950 


185 




Cooper 


..Greenback 


-. 81,740 






Smith 


..Prohibition 


9,522 






Walker 


..American 


2,636 




1880 


Hancock 


- Democrat 


...4,442,035 


155 




Garfield 


-.Republican 


-.4,449,053 


214 




Weaver 


..Greenback... . 


-- 307,306 






Dow 


--Prohibition 


-- 10,487 






Phelps 


--American 


707 




1884 


Cleveland-... 


..Democrat 


--4,911,017 


219 




Blaine 


--Republican 


...4,848,334 


182 




Butler- 


..Greenback 


-. 133,825 






St. John 


--Prohibition 


... 151,809 


... 



Popiilar Elec- 

Year Candidate Party Vote toral 

1888 Cleveland Democrat 5,540,050 168 

Harrison Republican 5,444,337 233 

Streeter Union Labor 146,897 ... 

Fisk Prohibition 250.125 ... 

Cowdrey United Labor.... 2,808 ... 

1892 Cleveland Democrat.. 5,554,414 277 

Harrison Republican 5,190,802 145 

Bidwell Prohibition 271,058 ... 

Weaver People's 1,027,329 22 

Wing Socialist 21.164 ... 

1896 McKinley...... Republican 7,035,638 271 

Bryan Democrat 6,467,946 176 

Levering Prohibition 141,676 

Bentley National 13,969 ... 

Matchett Socialist Labor... 36,454 

Palmer Nat. Dem 131,529 ... 

1900 McKinley...... Republican 7,219,530 292 

Bryan Democrat 6,358,071 155 

Woolley Prohibition 209,166 ... 

Barker People's 50.232 ..: 

Debs Soc. Dem 94,768 ... 

Malloney Soc. Lab. 32,751 ... 

Leonard. United Chr 518 ... 

Ellis... UnionR 5,098 ... 

1904 Roosevelt Republican 7,628,834 336 

Parker Democrat. 5,084.491 140 

Swallow Prohibition 259,257 ... 

Debs Socialist 402,460 ... 

Watson -People's 114,753 

Corregan Soc. Lab.. 33,724 ... 

Holcomb- Continental 830 

1908 Taft Republican. 7,679,006 321 

Bryan.. Democrat 6,409,106 162 

Chafin Prohibition 252,683 ... 

Debs.- Socialist... 420,820 ... 

Watson People's 28,131 ... 

Hisgen. Independence 83.562 

Gillhaus Soc. Lab. 13,825 ... 

Turney United Chr. 461 ... 

1912 Wilson.. Democrat 6.286.214 435 

Roosevelt Progressive 4.126.020 88 

Taft.. Republican 3.483.922 8 

Debs Socialist 897.011 ... 

Chafin. Prohibition 208.923 ... 

Reimer Soc. Lab. 29,079 ... 

1916 Wilson Democrat 9,129.269 277 

Hughes Republican 8,547,328 254 

Hanlv Prohibition 221.329 .... 

Benson So;ialist 590.579 .... 

Reimer Son. Lab 14,180 .... 

♦Owing to the death of Mr. Greeley, the 66 electoral votes 

were variously cast. Thomas A. Hendricks received 42, 

B. Gratz Brown 18, Horace Greeley 3, Charles J. Jenkins 2, 

David Davis 1. 

138 



ELECTORAL VOTE BY STATES 1916 

Alabama Wilson 1 

Arizona Wilson 

Arkansas Wilson 

California Wilson 1 

Colorado Wilson 

Connecticut Hughes 

Delaware Hughes 

Florida Wilson 

Georgia Wilson 1 

Idaho Wilson 

Illinois Hughfes 2 

Indiana Hughes 1 

Iowa Hughes 1 

Kansas Wilson 1 

Kentucky Wilson 1 

Louisiana Wilson 1 

Maine Hughes 

Maryland Wilson 

Massachusetts Hughes 1 

Michigan Hughes 1 

Minnesota Hughes 1 

Mississippi Wilson 1 

Missouri Wilson 1 

Montana Wilson 

Nebraska Wilson 

Nevada Wilson 

New Hampshire Wilson 

New Jersey Hughes 1 

New Mexico Wilson 

New York Hughes 4 

North CaroHna Wilson 1 

North Dakota Wilson 

Ohio Wilson 2 

Oklahoma Wilson 1 

Oregon Hughes 

Pennsylvania Hughes 3 

Rhode Island Hughes 

South Carolina Wilson 

South Dakota Hughes 

Tennessee Wilson 1 

Texas Wilson 2 

Utah Wilson 

Vermont Hughes 

Virginia Wilson ] 

Washington Wilson 

West Virginia Hughes 

Wisconsin Hughes 1 

Wyoming Wilson 

TOTAL FOR UNITED STATES 

Popular Electora 
Vote Vote 

Democrat— Wilson 9 , 129 , 269 277 

Republican— Hughes 8,547,328 254 

Socialist— Benson 590,579 

Probibitionist— Hanly 221,329 

139 



POPULAR PRESIDENTAL VOTE 1916. 

States Wilson I 

Alabama 97,606 

Arizona 33,170 

Arkansas 112,282 

California 466,289 

Colorado 178,816 

Connecticut 99,786 

Delaware 24,753 

Florida .■ 55,984 

Georgia 127,763 

Idaho ■ 70,054 

Illinois 950,229 

Indiana 334,065 

Iowa 222,505 

Kansas 314,588 

Kentucky 269,990 

Louisiana 79,875 

Maine 64,118 

Maryland 138,359 

Massachusetts 247 ,885 

Michigan 283,993 

Minnesota 179,157 

Mississippi 80,422 

Missouri 397,016 

Montana 101,063 

Nebraska 159,027 

Nevada 17,278 

New Hampshire 43 ,781 

New Jersey 211,018 

New Mexico 33,693 

New York 759,426 

North Carolina 168,383 

North Dakota 55,206 

Ohio 604,361 

Oklahoma 148,626 

Oregon.... 120,087 

Pennsylvania 521 ,784 

Rhode Island 40,394 

South Carolina 61,837 

South Dakota 59,335 

Tennessee 152,955 

Texas 285,950 

Utah 81,025 

Vermont 22,708, 

Virginia 102,824 

Washington 182,993 

West Virginia 140,403 

Wisconsin 193,042 

Wyoming 28,316 



Totals 9,129,269 

tVilson over Hughes 581 , 941 



140 



ELECTORAL VOTE 1916. 

The Electoral Vote of the States for President of the 
United States— Woodrow Wilson received the majority 
of votes. 

State Wilson Hughes 

Alabama 12 

Arizona 3 



California .• 13 

Colorado 6 

Connecticut 7 

Delaware 3 

Florida 6 

Georgia 14 

Idaho 4 

Illinois 29 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 10 

Maine 6 

Maryland. 



18 

Michigan 15 

12 



10 

18 

Montana 4 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 14 

New Mexico 3 

New York 45 

North Carolina 12 

North Dakota 5 

Ohio 24 

Oklahoma 10 

Oregon 5 

Pennsylvania 38 

Rhode Island 5 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 5 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 20 

Utah 4 

Vermont 4 

Virginia 12 

Washington 7 

West Virginia 8 



Wisconsin. 

Wyoming 3 

Totals 277 254 

Total mmiber electoral votes 531. Necessary for elec- 
tion 266. 

141 



CONGRESS 
Party Divisions in the House of Representatives— 66tb 
Congress, ending IVIarch 4, 1921. 

State Rep. Dem. Proh. Ind. Soc. Prog. 

10 



Arizona 


.... 6 
.... 3 
.... 4 
.... 1 

'.'.'.'."2 
.... 22 
.... 13 
.... 11 

.... 7 
.... 4 

'.'.'.'."4" 
.... 11 
.... 3 
.... 12 
.... 7 


. 1 . . 






Arkansas 

California 


. 7 ... 
4 
1 . . . 


1 ....... 




Colorado 






Connecticut 


1 ... 






Delaware 








Florida 


4 . . 






Georgia 


.12 ... 






Idaho 








Illinois 


5 . 














Iowa 








Kansas . . 


1 






Kentucky 

Louisiana 


7 ... 

. 7 ... 




.'." r 




4 ... 
3 . 


... I .. 




M aryland 






1 ... 






Minnesota 

Mississippi . 


1 ... 

8 . 


... 1 .. 


.. 1 




.... 5 
.... 1 
.... 6 
.... 2 

7 


11 ... 






Montana . ... 


1 ... 






Nebraska 
















Nevada.. . . 


1 ... 






New Jersey 


5 








. ... 1 








New York 


.... 26 
2 


17 . 






North Carolina.. , . 


10 ... 






North Dakota 




... 1 .. 




Ohio 


. ... 14 
.... 1 
.... 3 
. . . . 29 
.... 3 


8 






Oklahoma 


7 ... 






Oregon 








Pennsylvania 


6 ... 


. . . 1 . .. 




Rhode Island 




South Carolina 




7 ... 






South Dakota 


2 


1 








. .. 2 


8 ... 






Texas 


...2 


18 ... 
2 ... 






Utah 














Virginia 


.... 1 
... 5 
... 5 
... 10 
... 1 


9 .... 






Washington 

West Virginia 








1 .... 






Wisconsin 




] 






















Totals.. 


...241 


189 1 


4 1 


2 



Republican 241; Democrat 189; Independent 4; 
Progressives 2; Prohibitionists 1; Socialists 1. 

142 



51 



Sw. 



cS e9 g 4J 



o o _o 'a "a 
OOWQQ 



£§§05 c5 
£.sM 2 2 

H-) C3 c^ O O 



&H c c >> D. o. 

62B fc S S 

«c3 t, t-.Si fl a ^ o o 

a a a Eti toM^ — — 
§ S 2 S fe'^'fl'a 
H<i<J OOHQQ 

■* -^ ■* OOt^lMC^lM 



a a 



ii a a a a 

M O O O) O 

.S 2 S:2 2 o 5 «u ai 

ooo oggge 



) O Tf< OO <M CC < 
I O O O -H -^ < 



00 OO OC OO 00 



t-" C^ l>- t^ t^ 09 



£| 



I CO COlO 

) t^ 05 lO 
■ ^ CO 05 



>2?;i 



CO -^ t^ "5 «0 
^ «0 CT) CO CO (M 



•■HO 
. . • O) - 

"S a d fl 3 
goo opgc 

o^_ii^ 2 5 



143 



^ esi 00 T^ CO 



»-i-*O00lCt^O50»OCSI->*l00G0( 
OlOOOO»OI>.CO^irOCO<Mt>.CO' 






1' (M ^ O ■* 

o ^^ t^ t^ t-C 



_o ^ o 






o >.2: 



c3-.;50 .o- 



MsS^:^ 






• ■^GOco'noor^ioioiO'— I 



• ^' «■ M "O a> ^- • — — -t: i^ ii S 
a a a ^-ij g g g.c.S'o^ =«-§ 



" OS t^OOCO 



)-<0505i:CO< 

I CQ CO 05 05 00 ■ 



•iO -"^lOt^ 



.iooo5r^<Mcciot^iot^->#oo5 

■ ■ " " < CO -H rjc rt o 

I C<1 C<1 CO (M C<1 



(M^OiO-^lCCOt^—^c 






o a-B 

•<j<oO(?q<oo-^oo<rqoo-:f<oocsicc: 

C0Ot^t^0000000505OOO-^.-l 
0000000000000000000303050505 



144 



ill 

1^ - 

lii 



ill 

" ■* o o 



to ® S 

CI gCQ 






i"0>>C(M00050000505000ilO 

C ^ .-1 CO '-I — < T^ r^ ^ CO ■>*< 



•J.,-clMCO — 1— I— 11— 1 CS|>0 



1 1>. 05 o esi oo 



COCOCD->*<OOOCOC^(MI 



1 C^ O lO OO O O "O 



"O'^-^'MCiOOCnOiC 



2:i 



ccDcoo5-H(Mi-.mco-^oooco 

OOOOOOCO'O'-H 

5^ 



■0-52^? 



1 rt — . « M IC 



CO 

CcO"— IC005«DOOC>M< 

oJt^t^evjiO'— ie<it^-«*<c 



)r^t^i^ooi-^co'-icoNi 



: 7-1 c<ic^ ^ 1 



oo r-. 

or- 

CO ■>*l 






-g£ 



.23-5 03 C3 



f;r ^ •;. o y 05 

■g =s a '^^ J 






OCOOO<Me<I(M(M»OC^I^ — (?qcO 

tO^OJCOCDt^-^-^OOOOlTt*^ 
— 00<M0500(N»0^t^«500iO 
> rt C^ CO ^ rt rt -H IM XO 



O CO 
lO oo 



t: 


-a 


:£ 


^ 


.£ 




^ 


:£ 


.^ 


rf 

s 


1 


•1 

1 





145 



LOUISVILLE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION OF VOTERS 

OCTOBER 8-9, 1918. 

Fred O. Nuetze!, County Clerk. 



yNards 


Si 


ii 


1l 


175 

12 


First 


1665 
1784 
2766 

683 
1387 

881 

nil 

837 
496 
431 
2340 
4596 
218 


1067 

978 

2196 

960 

1428 

672 

596 

690 

904 

1662 

2512 

2956 

275 


289 
288 
677 
183 
335 
244 
229 
157 
127 
142 
438 
970 
33 


3021 


Second 


3050 


Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

ffighland Park 


5639 
1826 
3150 
1797 
1936 
1684 
1527 
2235 
5290 
8522 
526 








19195 


16896 


1 4112 


40203 



146 



003 



> 

zo 
o- 

oo 

Z" 
~Q 
UJZ 

l> 



cc 



"eg 

c CO b 
o ? 






11 



•a 9 



C^ <— I l^ O >0 t^ O l^ iO lO >o o 



CO ■<*< C<l 50 (M ( 



I-" 



■»ti -^ O 05 CO 



( c-1 CO I oo 



' O 'H C^ 

1 1^ CO -ti 



cc 00 00 —I CO i^ CO 
o; CO CO 00 C3 o: O 
t-, O t^ -^ CO 05 l^ 



CO CO cc CO CO < 

(N O CO CO t^ • . 

cvj ir<i oo o »c oo t^ I 



.o^cmt-iOoccoco^^i-^ 
ic^ooo»or^coc^coioccf^ 






^ I 



r-ii-HioO-^t^colr^oOiOCOiO 



C000C005--i(M-^»000OC<lT-l 
C0C!i(MiO0O.— li0050'-H-^i— 1 
CO-*«5COCOC2>— it^iO-^OO 



C<l (>1 oo O lO 00 I 



irfcooct^c^con'coaio'ir^ 

lOiMcot^c-qcooooii— i-^co 

|iOC0CCC?00Ot^-^-^O00 



I ^ I 



^§:h|:s 






147 



RESULT OF VOTE IN JEFFERSON COUNTY, 
NOVEMBER, 1918. 





Senator. 


Cong'- 
man. 


Ap'late 
Judge. 


PRECINCTS. 
















^i 


fed 


^e 


a d 


Sa 


. d 
















^W 


g« 


jft 


?r« 


s" 


•'4« 




CQ 


m 


CQ 


O 


o 


O 


Anchorage 


124 


119 


127 


115 


125 


115 


Allison 


184 
95 


168 
243 


211 
99 


139 
237 


189 
100 


161 


Albemarle 


235 


Boston 


79 
62 


65 
93 


82 

77 


64 

78 


82 
62 


64 


Cherokee 


94 


Crossroads 


41 


38 


44 


37 


43 


36 


E.Oakdale 


132 


114 


129 


113 


129 


108 


Fisherville 


92 


101 


92 


101 


94 


97 


Fairmont 


72 


67 


76 


62 


79 


64 


Fern Creek 


85 


81 


95 


75 


92 


77 




166 
105 
85 


185 
161 
93 


171 
112 
91 


179 
151 
83 


163 
112 
86 


18'^ 


Hokes 


151 


Harrods Creek ... 


86 


Indian Hill 


68 


76 


78 


64 


75 


68 


Jefifersontown . . . 


155 


159 


164 


145 


163 


148 


Jacob Park 


99 


131 


101 


127 


99 


128 


Jacob Addition . . . 


91 


107 


92 


103 


87 


105 


Middletown 


163 


117 


170 


112 


161 


117 


Malott 


61 

82 


65 
114 


58 
85 


65 
114 


57 

85 


65 


Meadowlawn 


111 


N.Highland P.. . 


97 


79 


95 


78 


97 


76 


O'Bannons 


58 


50 


62 


48 


61 


49 


Robbs 


101 
81 


105 
145 


101 

81 


103 
142 


103 
80 


103 


S.Highland P.... 


142 


Spring Gar 


85 


121 


88 


116 


88 


117 


Springdale 


70 


74 


71 


69 


73 


60 


St. Helens 


75 


138 


75 


138 


75 


138 


Shively 


75 
136 


118 
223 


79 
121 


113 
234 


78 
119 


111 


Schardeins 


232 


Two-Mile H 


188 


233 


225 


201 


198 


223 


Valley 


79 

28 


63 
40 


81 
29 


58 
38 


81 
27 


57 


W.Highland P.. . 


40 


W.Oakdale 


97 


79 


97 


75 


97 


76 


Woods 


61 


95 

3860 


62 
3421 


90 
3667 


61 
3311 


92 


Totals 


3272 


3734 



148 






1S^ 



CSOOOOOOrOCOCSOCOCDCD 
CO CO «D <N T»< (m' (m' C^ M <m' CD O 



COt^OOCO<M!OOCOCO'*ICJ>a5 
•>*<-hC0CDtJ<0503000>I^C»O 

cocoooooooicoor^cst^c^i 



t^OCOOCOiOCtiCrfiOC-^" 
t^rlOlOCOCOOO-^-^OOOt 



.-HMCO'-KM^ T-(T-(, 



cc ® 
uu 

It 



ecu 



_ to 



O<Mt^OCit^-^i0!M<MOC0 

C500«scoo-*-^'rec^'0(M 
<M-^oo<MTt(cocoe<i'-i<-<«cco 



-<^ CO <^^ lO Tjt ^ <M I 

C^l Cq O O CO ■*■<*< i_ 



c lO CD M CXI CD lO " 



t— iO^CD-^CO-^-^iOOOOTt< 
t^OON03l-^<MOiOI^COTf<t^ 

C^COOCOClCiOO^-^CSlCSlcC 



oD'^HOOioioccmoot^io 

TttiOCSlTjtcOCOTjtcOlOt^O-* 



05r-litlt^0200Cl002lCCOC005 
OOCOt-~COt^t^OOOCDOOiC^ 
t>.OOt:^05(MiCiCOt^C5'OT-<(>l 






5l 


1.552 

2.021 

2.875 

756 

1.608 

1.020 

1.348 

970 

603 

473 

2.946 

5.019 




00 


1 

C5 


^1 


SilisliSisis 


05 


00 






821 

1.184 

1.549 

447 

854 

613 

488 

554 

379 

306 

1.510 

2.885 


o 


o 


i 



.5S 



p»hcocch;2;e-iweh 
149 



Official Vote of Louisville and Jefferson County for 

Governor, and Other State, County and 

City Officers— 1919. 

The official count of the vote cast for Governor 
in the Fifth District shows that Edwin P. Morrow received 
30.847 votes and James D. Black, 21,399, a majority of 
9,448 for Morrow. 

The vote by wards and in the county follows: 

Black Morrow. 

First 1,377 1,719 

Second 1,664 1,667 

Third 2,464 3,663 

Fourth 640 1,482 

Fifth 1,366 2,249 

Sixth 877 1,203 

Seventh 1,172 1,071 

Eighth 829 1,209 

Ninth 505 1,364 

Tenth 403 2,130 

Eleventh 2, 108 3,574 

Twelfth 4,249 4,801 



17,654 26,132 
County 3,745 4,715 



Total 21,399 30,847 

The totals for the district in other State races were 
as follows: 

Lieutenant-Governor— Shanks, D., 21,262; Ballard, 
R., 30,692. 

Secretary of State— Cohen, D., 20.848; Vaughan, R., 
29,668. 

Attorney-General— Daueherty, D.. 20,975; Dawson, 
R., 29,545. 

Auditor— Bosworth, D., 20,845; Craig, R., 29,469. 

Treasurer- Turner, D., 20,908; Wallace, R., 29,407. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction— Foster, D., 
20,887; Colvin, R., 29,409. 

Commissioner of Agriculture— Newman, D., 20,832; 
Hanna,R., 29,495. 

Clerk Court of Appeals— Goodman, D., 20,678; Speck, 
R., 29,541. 

Railroad Commissioner— Douthitt, D., 20,746; Cooper, 
R., 29,181. 

Following was the vote for County Conunissioner: 
Nevin,D., and Meshling, D., 20,799 and 20,606; Grinstead, 
R., and Hunt, R., 29,084 and 29,619. 



150 



The vote for Park Commissioners was as follows: 
McKay, D., 17,097; Murphv, D., 17,001; Bizot, D., 17,016; 
Gray, R., 24,975; Carrell, R., 24,815; Drexler, R., 24,985. 

Arthur A. Will led the RepuUican Aldermanic ticket 
with 24,774 votes, and S. L. Watkins led the Democratic 
Aldermanic ticket with 17,157. Felix Dumas, with 25,203 
votes, and Arthur S. Kaltenbaeher, with 17,167, led the two 
Councilmanic tickets. 

The closest race was that in which Joseph Lazarus, R., 
defeated Muir Weissinger for Representative from the 
Sixth and Seventh wards by a majority of 98 votes. 

The sewer bond issue received 15,591 votes and 5,107 
were cast against it. 

For the prohibition amendment 12,351 votes were cast 
and it was opposed by 37,344 voters, a majority of 24,993. 

The vote for constitutional amendment for automatic 
removal of officers yielding to mob \aolence was 10,484 
against 7,425. 



151 









II 


■(a) U!A|O0 


1541 
1582 
3527 
1421 
2053 
1150 
1031 
1162 
1318 
2049 
3429 
4583 


S' 


i 


■(a) Jajsoj 


2So^^SSSS235S^ 


si 


i 


H 


•(a) 90BIIBM 




S3S 


i 


•(a) jeujnx 


TjHOTt<OCCC0OTtH05«0t^C0 
COCO^t^COOOj-HGOTltCOOiT-, 


11 


i 


< 


•(a) BiBJO 




IS 


1 


(a) quoMsoa 


^o^S^SSSlc^o^ 


2S 


iO 


1 

>• 

< 


•(a) UOSMBQ 




55§ 


To 

i 


(Q XijaqenBo 






JO 




•(a) uBMSnBA 


MO'O'-ICCl-^tlOS'— 100tJ<O5i— 1 


ii 


i 


•(a) U9MO0 




si 


00 








-J o 


■(a) pjBiiBa 


llillillliii 




i 


(a) s>|UBMS 




c5 


1 
3 


(a) Mojjoi/\i 






s 

^ 


(a) >ioBia 


^iiii^Siiisi 


ii 


?3 




Q 
CC 

i 


. 






1 




^ 

^ 


^ 




.1 


1 


ii 


"a 

s 


1 



152 






o 
U 



•japojQ 



Xbxoj^ 



•junH 



pBa;snijQ 



•3niiqo8j^ 



■niA9^ 



•(^ jadooo 



(a) Miq^noQ 



•(H) 5io9ds 



(a) nBuipoor) 



CH) Bna^H 



(q) OBOLiia^ 






I »0 C2 (M OO CO 1 



1 CO 50 CO lO 



cor^oc^»oio-*iOT-iT}tcocs 



lO^coM— <T»<^^05Cncot^ 

COCCCOCDCOOO'— IOO->1<COOO 



. O t^ oo r-~ 05 < 

I COi-H 005 00 ■ 

1 OO >-H 00 ■<*< CO < 



lt^C0t-^lOO5CO-Jt<C<l( 
i^HcOC^iOCO'-HOO! 

iTj<«;cqoo-Hooioco< 



COiOlO-*-— 11— CO"— iCOO-^i 



ira u-3 Tt< -H — 1 o ^ 



CO M lO lO 00 

_ 1— 1 CO o ■* »o 

M^-Hrt^MCOTti 



iTj(T^COCOC<l-^«OOi<M00t^ 
((Mt^C^^COOOO-. C5COCO 
ICDCOc»COCOOOOTt<COO^ 



COCflOTt<0005C5COOOCO(MC^ 
i0r005C0^C0OOOOt^(M 
O CO O CO 00 -^ 00 "5 CO O --I 



■<*iO05t^00t>.<NIC5'-H00t^ 
OOOrt(M-^.-iO^CO^CD 

omiracoo-HO-Hcocs-^io 

^^COi-c(M»-lrtrt^^C0-^ 



lO CO 






-H CO 

t— CO 



' '-^ CO ^ lo ^ o 



CO lO >0 Tt< --H -H (_ 

1— li— ICOt-hC^'— li— li-Hr-IC 



^■^OOOrtcOt^cO^iOrtiO 
cDcoc^cocoiraio— 1005100 

COCOTtlCOIMOOOOOlOCOOO 



-HOci0C2-rt<-H^H.— ilr^coooo 
COOOO"— i-<*<iOl>JCO-HiOiOC2 



l^05t~I:^»-<lOC0»0l0O00 
• ■»tl'-lCOCOt-~»0-H005Tj<0 
ICO-^COCOOO'-100->*000>— c 



03 CO 
i-H CO 
t^ CO 



153 



5 >. TS 



OFFICIAL VOTE OF KENTUCKY FOR OFFICERS, 

1919, PROHIBITION AND MOB LAW 

GOVERNOR 

Edwin P. Morrow 254,290 

James D. Black 214,114 

George H. Becker. 4,221 

Morrow's plurality 35, 955 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

S. Thruston BaUard 239,641 

W. H. Snanks. 205,085 

John Thobe 3,750 

Ballard's plurality 30,406 

SECRETARY OF STATE. 

Fred A. Vaughan 237,870 

Mat S. Cohen 204,281 

Thomas H. Demaree 2,951 

Vaughan's plurality 30,638 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

Charles I. Dawson 237,177 

Frank E. Daugherty 204,868 

Dawson's majority 32,309 

AUDITOR. 

John J. Craig 238,097 

H. M. Bosworth 204,143 

Albert Schmitz 3,698 

Craig's plurality 30,255 

TREASURER. 

James A. Wallace 236,890 

Henry F. Turner 203,773 

Ben Noe 3 , 646 

Wallace's plurahty 29,471 

STATE SUPERINTENDENT. 

George Colvin 237,336 

L. E. Foster 198,890 

Colvin's majority 38,446 

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE. 

W. C. Hanna 236,403 

John W. Newman 203,859 

W. A. Haskins 3,713 

Hanna's plurality 28,831 

CLERK OF THE COURT OF APPEALS. 

Roy B. Speck 236, 618 

J. A. Goodman 203,749 

William Chappell 3,630 

Speck's plurality 29,239 

RAILROAD COMMISSIONER. 
First District. 

Frank N. Burns, Democrat 70,072 

J. A. Miller, Repubhcan 66,513 

Burns' majority 3,559 

154 



Second District. 

J. S. Cooper, Republican 77,405 

Sid Douthitt, Democrat 72,597 

Cooper's majority 4 , 708 

Third District. 
E. C. Kash. Republican 89,867 

No opposition. 

STATE WIDE PROHIBITION. 

On official count, State Wide Prohibition won by a 
majority of 10,717. 

Mob Law Wins By 46,247. 

Constitutional amendment No. 1, directing the Gen- 
eral Assembly to ena't a law providing for removal from 
office any peace officer who releases a prisoner to a mob, 
carried by 46,247. The vote stood: Yes, 88,678; no, 
42,430. 

DEMOCRATIC STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE 

(Chosen at State Convention held in Louisville, May 4, 
1920) Headquarters Seelbach Hotel, Louisville. 

Judge Charles A. Hardin, Harrodsburg, Chairman; 
Sidney N. Glenn, Eddy^alle, Ky., Secretary. 

STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 
Member from State at large. 
George R. Martin, Catlettsburg. 
First District— Arch Nelson, Marshall 'County. 
Second District— Ira D. Smith, Christian County. 
Third District— T. P. Dickerson, Glasgow 
Fourth District— \V. C. Montgomery, Hardin Countv. 
Fifth District— Henry J. Tilford, Louisville. 
Sixth District— Judge Otto Wolfe, Newport. 
Seventh District— Thomas P. Middleton, Henry 
County. 

Eighth District— J. H. Nichols, Boyle County. 
Ninth District— Foster B. Co.x, Nicholasville. 
Tenth District— J. R. Robinson, Pike County. 
Eleventh District— Edward Gatliff, Williamsburg. 
DEMOCRATIC STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
(Selected at State Convention held in Louisville, 
May 4, 1920.) 

DEMOCRATIC STATE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE 
John L. Grayot, Chairman. 

STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Member from State at large. 
J. A. Robinson, Lancaster. 
First District— Thomas Turner, Trigg County. 
Second District— John L. Dorsey, Henderson. 
Third District — Dr. Joe M. Ferguson, Muhlenburg 
County. 

Fourth District— Charles Hubbard, Larue County. 
Fifth District— Fred Forcht, Louisville. 
Sixth District— W. N. Hind, Covington. 

155 



Seventh District— W. F. Klair, Lexington. 
Eight District— Dr. T. R. Welch, Jessamine County. 
Ninth District- Dr. J. D. Whitaker, Morgan County. 
Tenth District— Bailey P. Wooten, Perry County. 
Eleventh District— Cecil Williams, Pulaski County. 

Democratic National Committeeman. 

Johnson U. Camden, Versailles, Ky. 

DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIALS ELECTORS. 
State At Large. 

Marion E. Taylor, Louisville; A. J. A. Alexander, 
Fulton County. 

First District— Robert Scott, Paducah; J. Elliott Baker, 
Princeton, assistant. 

Second District — G. L. Withers, Webster; James 
Breathitt, Jr., Christian County, assistant. 

Third District— Alex P. Cheney, Bowling Green; 
Coleman Gill, Todd County, assistant. 

Fourth District— T. Scott Mayes, Washington County; 
Charles Carroll, Bullitt County, assistant. 

Fifth District— J. 0. Ames, Louisville; Henry T. Craft, 
Louisville, 



Sixth District— J. Lucas Reed, Kenton; Edward P. 
Barker, Pendelton, assistant. 

Seventh District— Robert Crowe, La Grange. 

Eighth District — Gordon Montgomery, Adair County; 
E. C. Moore, Casey County, assistant. 

Ninth District— R. T. Kinnard, Carter County 

Tenth District— Frank W. Stowers, Pike County; 
John B. Webb, Knott County, assistant. 

Eleventh District— Guy Patterson, Bell County; Vir- 
gil P. Smith, Somerset, assistant. 

DELEGATES TO DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVEN- 
TION AT SAN FRANCISCO. 
Named at the Democratic State Convention, 
held at Louisville, May 4, 1920. 

DELEGATES FROM THE STATE AT LARGE 

J. C. W. Beckham, U. S. Senator. 

A. 0. Stanley, U. S. Senator. 

Allen W. Barkley, Congressman from 1st District. 

Ben Johnson, Congressman from 4th District. 

Desha Breckenridge, Editor Lexington Herald. 

156 



Miss Laura Clay, Lexington. 

Mrs. Cora Wilson Stewart, Frankfort. 

Mrs. Nora Layne, Fort Thomas. 

DISTRICT DELEGATES. 

First District— Clem S. Nunn, Crittenden County; John L. 
Dismukes, Graves County; alternates, Mrs. Edmond 
M. Post, Paducah, and Dr. Ben D. Keys. 

Second District — Josh T. Griffith, Owensboro; Judge J. F. 
Gordon, Madisomille; alternates, Miss Lulu T. Cox, 
McLean County; W. J. Nesbitt, Providence. 

Third District— John H. Durham, Franklin; Thomas S. 
Rbea, Logan County; alternates, Mrs. Nat D. Terry, 
Glasgow, and Mrs. James A. Mitchell, Bowhng Green. 

Fourth District— J. H. McChord, Washington County; R. 

E. Lee Simmerman, Ohio County; alternates. Miss 
Luella Mae Stiles and Mrs. T. L. Richardson, Hardin 
County. 

Fifth District— A. P. Humphrey and P. H. Callahan, Louis- 
\'ille; alternates, W. W. Da\nes and Wallace Embry, 
Louisville. 

Sixth District— Hess Rouse, Kenton; R. B. Brown, Galla- 
tin; alternates, the Rev. James Crutchfield, Campbell; 

F. B. Adcock, CarroU. 

Seventh District— June Gayle, Owenton; Robert R. Friend, 
Irvine; alternates, J. M. Stevenson, Winchester, and 
Victor Bradley, Georgetown. 

Eighth District— Dr. B. F. Shields, Spencer County; W. H. 
Shanks, Lincoln County; alternates, James P. Parks, 
Madison County, and Robert Johnson, Anderson 
County. 

Ninth District— Stanley F. Reed, Mason County; Charles 
W. Mathers, Nicholas County; R. L. Vincent, Law- 
rence County; alternates, Dan B. Caudill, Rowan 
County, and C. D. Patterson, Montgomery County. 

Tenth District— F. T. Hatcher, Pike County; G. C. 
Wells, Johnson County; alternates, E. W. Pendleton, 
Floyd County, and S. V. Metzger, Magoffin County. 

Eleventh District — A. W. Rhorer, Middlesboro; Clarence 
Duncan, Monticello; Robert Rowe, Pulaski County; 

C. J. Siffle, Laurel County. 

REPUBLICAN STATE CAMPAIGN COMiVIITTEE 

Chesley H. Searcy, Louisville, Chairman. 

Alvis S. Bennett, Secretary. 

James F. Ramey, Speaker's Bureau. 

Thomas L. Walker. Treasurer. 

A. T. Hert, Louisville. 

W. L. Prince, Benton. 

W. T. Fowler, Hopkinsville. 

John H. Gilliam, Scottsville. 

D. 0. Burk, Bradfordsville. 
Chas. W. WTiite, Louisville. 

157 



John J. Craig, Covington. 
Ed. C. O'Rear, Frankfort. 
W. C. Hanna, Shelby^ille. 
T. A. Field, Ashland. 
Fred A. Vaughan, Paintsville. 
L. W. Bethunim, Mount Vernon. 
W. L. Moss, Pineville. 
Chas. A. Segner, Louisville. 
Harry GiovanoUi, Lexington. 
W. H. Jones, Glasgow. 

REPUBLICAN STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

Chesley H. Searcy, Chairman, Louisville. 

R. W. Hunter, Vice-Chairman, Providence. 

Alvis S. Bennett, Seretary. 

Elliott Callahan, Treasurer, Louisville. 
Headquarters — Republic Bldg., Louisville. Ky. 
First District— W. L. Prince, Benton. 
Second District— Virgil Y. Moore, Madisonville. 
Third District— Clayton S. Curd, Greenville. 
Fourth District— D. 0. Burks, Bradfordsville. 
Fifth District— J. Matt Chilton, Louisville. 
Sixth District— G. A. Seller, Covangton. 
Seventh District — Clarence Miller, Irvine. 
Eighth District — H. B. Bastin, Lancaster. 
Ninth District— T. A. Field, Ashland. 
Tenth District— Sam CoUins, Whitesburg. 
Eleventh District— Charley Finley, Williamsburg. 

STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE AT LARGE. 

Mrs. John W. Langley, Pikeville. 
Maurice Galvin, Covington. 
Robert Hunter, Providence. 
Ed Chenault, Le.xington. 

REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. 
First District— J. F. Heath, Benton. 
Second District— Dr. C. B. Johnson, Madisonville. 
Third District — W. 0. Moates, Morgantown. 
Fourth District- 0. W. Stanley, Bardstown. 
Fifth District— Frank B. Russell, Louisville. 
Sixth District— R. R. Edwards, Walton. 
Seventh District— S. D. Pinkerton, Versailles. 
Eighth District— J. L. Perr\-man, Columbia. 
Ninth District— John M. Theobald, Grayson. 
Eleventh District— W. T. Tipton, Corbin. 
State At Large— W. J. Deboe, Marion; Samuel Willis, 
Ashalnd. 

DELEGATES TO REPUBLICAN NATIONAL 
CONVENTION. 
First District— Adolph Weil, Paducah; Charles L. Ferguson, 

Livingston. 
Second District — Gray Haynes, Owensboro; Claude R. 
Clark, Hopkinsville. 

158 



Third District — A. A. Demumbrura, Brownsville; Shermau 

Carver, Edmonton. 
Fourth District— Sherman Ball, Hardinsburg; Gabe A. 

\\Tiarton, Springfield. 
Fifth District— William Heyburn, Louisville; Charles A. 

Segner, Louisville. 
Sixth District— Maurice Galvin, Covington; W. A. Bur- 

kamp, Newport. 
Seventh District— Richard Stoll, Lexington; Thomas M. 

Owsley, Lexington. 
Eighth District— W. J. Wallace, Richmond; J. L. Butler, 

Danville. 
Ninth District— W. C. Halbert, Vanceburg; M. S. Grain, 

Jackson. 
Tenth District— Tolbert Holliday, Hazard; C. F. Ramey, 

Hazard. 
Eleventh District— J. A. Brown, Monticello; Hiron Johnson, 

London. 

DELEGATES AT LARGE. 

Mrs. Christine Bradley, Frankfort. 
Governor Edwin P. Morrow, Somerset. 
A. T. Hert. Louisville. 
Dr. S. H. George, Paducah. 

ALTERNATES. 
H. Green Garrett, Winchester. 
Mrs. John W. Langley, Pikevalle. 
Dr. Ben L. Bruner, Louisville. 
George F. David, Lexington. 

HEADQUARTERS REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN 

COMMITTEE. 

CITY OF LOUISVILLE 

Louisville Trust BIdg. 

S. Thruston Ballard, Chairman. 
W. T. Basket, Secretary. 
Robert H. Lucas, Chairman of Organization. 
Chesley H. Searcy, Chairman Finance Committee. 
Paul Burlingame, Chairman Publicity Committee. 
Joseph Seligman, Chairman Legal Comnaittee. 
Ernest King, Chairman Speaker's Committee. 
George T. Wood, Treasurer. 

JEFFERSON CO., KY. 

REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Elected— 1920. 

Headquarters— Louisville Trust Building. 
Robert H. Lucas, Chairman. 
William Heyburn, Vice Chairman. 
Harry Browning, Vice-Chairman. 
J. William Spanyer. Secretary. 
Edward J. Miller, Treasurer. 

159 



J. W. Bomar, Sergeant-at-arms. 

Members of the committee are: 
First Ward— Harry Browning. 
Second Ward-J. D. Thomas. 
Third Ward— Peter Roser, Edward J. JVlilIer, Robert H. 

Lucas. 
Fourth Ward— C. V. Mehler. 
Fifth Ward— L. D. Baldauf, H. P. Ogden. 
Sixth Ward— Chesley H. Searcy. 
Seventh Ward— William Heyburn. 
Eighth Ward— M. J. Filben. 
Ninth Ward— Harry Levy. 

Tenth Ward— Dr. E. D. Whedbee, Dr. P. R. Peters. 
Eleventh Ward- W. C. Washington, Louis Eppinger, 

Chester P. Koch. „, „ , ,-, * 

Twelfth Ward- Eugene M. Daily. F. W. Sulzer, W. A. 

Beckham, J. William Bomar, Frank L. Watson. 
First Magisterial District— S. Thruston Ballard. 
Second Magisterial District— B. Bernheim. 
Third Magisterial District— C. E. Barton. 
Fourth Magisterial District— T. A. Dover. 



160 



NOTICE 

To the holder of this publication: 

The publishers are not to be held re- 
sponsible for any errors that may appear 
in this publication. 

The data herein has been gathered 
from various sources and is as near correct 
and up to the date of publication as is 
possible to secure. 

The statistics and statements are pub- 
lished just as gathered, and we would 
respectfully suggest that anyone finding 
errors therein be kind enough to advise 
us, so that in succeeding issues we may 
make the necessary corrections. 

It is the purpose and desire of the 
publishers to make of "Louisville Infor- 
mation" a publication of great interest 
and value to every citizen of Louisville 
and of service and information to the 
"stranger within our gates." 
Yours very truly, 

THE STANDARD PRINTING CO., 

PUBLISHERS 

By D. B. G. ROSE, 

President-General Manager 

January 1, 1921. Call 3500 



U u l-i 

moo 

o 



OC5 



00-^ 

CO O (M 
«0 ■* CO 









U5 


CO 












o o r~ Oi -^ 



m»OTfOC0>0<M05lC00l^C0-H 

:^o-Ht^t^-*icooco!nco-*'t=>oo 

rt CO (M O O O CO O i-i ■* t- 



«C -^ 00 O T-4 10 



_ I^ 05 10 CO 

•* 'rff CC >0 CO 



(M 00 CJ 00 CO T-i O 



c3-<l'CO-<*<'-ICO-H00«»(M«)-«*<->*rHT*<t^O>— ICO— lO^^i—CTl 

fc^ iuio-*ooo5co<Mo;T-<cot^oicoc^coci— 'co<Mc;coc;c;c5 

S gC<Hr5CO^Ot^OOlO'-iiOCOcOC3-^-*iOC;00-*0-. (Mt^ 

O Cc005iCO-<*<00>Ot^cO-*l'— iI>->OOt^OCOcOCOC<ICn'«« 
ScO(MOC<10C^C0030'*lCOrtiNOOi-0 00>COOt^COTH5 



• COtH cot^ 






UJ >> 

CCfQ 



.S:i:<^'-^c^cn^M'OMKc<i<>oP-t~--oooco»o^LOOc-q- 

r3_QCOOOOOC<lCvlOO<yDOCO'*COCD(M-.S<lOCO^^OO-^CO' 



c20CO<M(MOOOCCOlOmi->00-*OOOOOOb-eO»0'-l-^(M 



C5 r;^t^O'^C005C<)T}<T-<00Cc0-<*C:(MC0OC0^(MO.— 1 

Wi^t^ COCOC^t>-(M >«■<*<■«*<(» IMCiCOCOiOCOC'OCOQOcOT-i,-i< 
jS co^cq -* coo CO Til i-c<M corpus 1 



e 



O 2 ^ &-0 MO 

^t: o S rt-C 5: 



-^ iH i^ C3 O O 






.2 c 

-3 & 






III 11 



S 5 g'3 rtJ.2.S.2.2 















1 
^ 




{2 






1 



o 






o" 


^ : 



«0 COO 

05 r- -H 

«o «o >o 

COM 



Tf <o o 00 1~ «ra 

t~- <M 05 <M -^ ^O 
t^ OC t:~- »0 CO (M 



Jlis 


■*<riCsii^-oo--— 1-^00 




00O5 5CCOCO 


.o, — f:^ 


CO 00 t- IC Ol O ■<1< 
O U5M t- 


c^ooco 


oo^o- 



I o CO eo CO 00 o I 



I ■* do O CO I 



'OtOcOCC'C:tDCOT^I 



: O l>- CC C-J CO ( 



t^ 05 0> CO CO 1 



' o »o t^ o »o o < 



r>C:cOcOO'-'-<*<OCOI 

T^ 03 CO i 

i-H CO . 



I -^ 03 CO '-I T-H 



oeoeoco<-"#'-ioococ^vflco»cc:)! 



I O C5 IC CO 00 I^ I 



Ci — ' lO lO ' 



I O C5 CO 00 00 t^ CO < 



•.S-2 



coQ 



is^is^: 



C3-0.5-S 



o c >> 



2ocg 






^ =" ? 35 i« 



Cox Macauley 

Soc.-Labor Single Tax 

Connecticut 1,491 

Delaware 39 

Illinois 3,471 775 

Indiana 566 

Iowa 982 

Maine 310 

Maryland 1, 178 

Massachusetts 3 , 583 

Michigan 2,539 484 

Minnesota 5,828 

Missouri 2,764 

New Jersey 923 517 

New York 17,428 

Ohio 2,153 

Oregon 1,515 

Pennsylvania 753 803 

Rhode Island 495 100 



Totals 42,950 5,747 

American 
Party 
Texas 47,495 

Black 
and Tan 
Texas 27,247 

Popular vote, Harding over Cox, 7,001,763. 

Total popular vote, all candidates, 26,759,708. 

Unofficial figures giving the vote of the various States 
have previously been published. The total vote of 1920, 
an increase of 9,091.881 over four years ago, was largely 
due to the enfranchisement of women by the Nineteenth 
Amendment to the Constitution. 



H .2 





.0 19 • • 


rj -»J 


1 1 


^ O 


•^—1 • 


o = 


CO^OIM '(MlO 


""« 


^^000 • 


^ 


NN \(M 


^1 


05 ^ M ■* 00 <M =« 


=>cS 


^<MOOC-t- C^ 


(M,-l CO 



3—3 02 r^ i~~ £*? ''^ 

^ C2 O 00 CO t^ 



■w "^^"^ ,-1 C<I 03 »o ?o 



^s 



PQ COCO.-I 

:sr3 ococooOM'"* 
■: ^ C5 oco t^ 00 



^ 05 O'^ 05 O >£5 



««•= . t:z 

Qgg^O «co^- 



S"^r- ■■^iOO<M^'^'=^'^ 




00 O <M O •* »0 »« 1 
t>. Tt< CO '-' <M T-H 1-1 



'P, cPi-j'^"S-r3 t^ ,-( CO ■<*< CO 05 C5 •* ■* o «~- 1- 1- <=^ 



S|h5 

a> 0D3; 

= Q-UJ 
<1P> 



S^ 



S 5 
§1 






lll^ll|-|3-||«««^^«^ 



161 



THE 10TH AND FfNAL BALLOT BY STATES. 



I'l 


Ala 


8 
G 
13 


3 


3 






fi 


Ariz 






IS 


Ark 










'>fi 


Cal 






26 




1'> 


Colo 

Conn . . . 


12 
13 
6 

73/2 

10 
2 
38 1-5 
21 
26 
18 
26 
12 








14 






1 




f^ 


Del 








8 


Fla 


3 








17 


Ga 








8 

58 


Idaho 

Ill 


2 

1 


1 

18 4-5 




30 


Ind 




■^fi 


Iowa 




'>0 


Kan 


1 






1 


''fi 


Kv 








1'> 


La 










1'> 


Me 


12 
10 

17 

1 

21 








Ifi 


Md 




17 
25 
2 
12 
36 






1 


?"! 


Mass 








SO 


Mich 




4 
1 




?4 


Minn 




1'> 


Miss 




S6 


Mo 




- 






8 


Mont 






8 
7 
1 




Ifi 


Neb 


4 
3M 


5 






6 


Nev 


m 


8 


N H 


8 
15 






'>8 


N.J 


5 

6 
68 
20 
10 
48 
18 

2 

60 
10 
11 

4 
20 
23 

5 




7 


. 1 


6 


N.Mex 

N.Y 




88 


6 

2 


3 




4 


99 


N. C 




16 


N D 








dS 


Ohio 










''O 


*0kla 


3^ 
14 








10 


Ore 




5 

1 




7fi 


Penn 




10 


R.I 




11 


S C 










10 


S. D 

Tenn 


6 








'>0 








QCj 


Tex 

Utah 










8 


1 


2 







*Oklahoma H not voting. 



162 



THE 10TH AND FINAL BALLOT BY STATES 
- Continugd. 



1 

> 


s 


a 
1 


1 


1 


1 


W 


8 

15 

14 

16 

26 

6 

2 

2 

9 


Vt 




8 

1 








Va 


14 
14 
16 
1 
6 
2 

2 
2 








Wash 

W.Va 

Wis 

Wyo 

Alaska 

D. ofC 

Hawaii 

Phil 
























































2 


9 








Porto R . . . : . . 

Totals 


2 






















6721-51 176 


13 


804-5 


91 



Total votes cast 984. 

Scattered votes: Wisconsin, LaFollette 24; Mass 
Coolidge, 1; New York, Coolidge, 4; Lenroot, 1 and Butlei 
2; Oklahoma, Hays, 1; Pennsylvania, Knox, 1. 

BALLOTS CAST IN PREVIOUS REPUBLICAN 
CONVENTIONS. 

No. ( 
Year. Nominee. Ballo 

1860 Lincoln 

1864 Lincoln 

1868 Grant 

1872 Grant 

1876 Hayes 

1880 Garfield ' 

1884 Blaine 

1888 Harrison 

1892 Harrison 

1896 McKinley 

1900 McKinley 

1904 Roosevelt 

1908 Taft 

1912 Taft 

1916 Hughes 

'Acclamation. 

REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE. 

Will H. Hays, Chairman, Indiana. 
John T. Adams, Vice-Chairman, Iowa. 
Clarence B. Miller, Secretary, Minnesota. 
Edwin T. Thayer, Sergeant-at-arnis. 
Guy Howard, .\ssistant Sergeant-at-arms. 

163 



DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES FOR 

PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT 

Nominated at the Democratic Convention held at 

San Francisco, Cal., July 4, 1920 



FOR PRESIDENT 

JAMES M. COX, Governor of Ohio 

VICE PRESIDENT 

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT of New York 

FOR PRESIDENT 

I Cox 1 McAdooi Palmer 

First ballot 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

Thu-teenth 

Fourteenth 

Fifteenth 

Sixteenth 

Seventeenth 

Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-first 

Twenty-second 

Twenty-third 

Twenty-fourth 

Twenty-fifth •. . . . 

Twenty-sixth 

Twenty-seventh 

Twenty-eighth 

Twenty-ninth 

Thirtieth 

Thirty-first 

Thirty-second 

Thirty-third 

Thirty-fourth 

TMrty-fif th 

Thu-ty-sixth 

Thirty-seventh 

Thirty-eighth 

Thirty-ninth 

Fortieth 

Forty-first 

Forty-second 

Forty-third 

♦Forty-fourth 

♦Nomination made unanimous. 

164 



134 


266 


159 


289 


177 


323J^ 


178 


339 


181 


357 


195 


3681^ 


295 


384 


315 


380 


321 


386 


321 


385 


332 


380 


404 


375)^ 


428H 


363H 


443H 


355>^ 


468>^ 


SWA 


454i/9 


337 


442 


332 


458 


330M 


468 


327M 


456i/9 


340M 


426H 


395>^ 


430 


mvz 


425 


385 


489 


SMVz 


424 , 


dOiVz 


424^ 


371 


423^ 


371^ 


423 


368H 


mv9 


394^ 


400M 


4033^ 


391 


414^ 


391 


421 


380H 


421 


279H 


my2 


376H 


409 


377 


399 


386 


405 


3831^ 


405H 


468^^ 


440 


490 


467 


4971^ 


458 


5401/^ 


427 


568 


412 


702^ 


266J^ 



The 44TH AND FINAL BALLOT BY STATES 
The forty-fourth and last ballot by States follows: 



States 1 Cox | McAdool Davis Owen 




13 
3 
18 
13 
9 
12 
3 
12 
28 


8 
3 


3 














California 


13 
3 
2 
3 






Colorado 












Delaware 






Florida 














Idaho 


3 
13 








44 
30 
26 


1 




TnHiana 












Kansas . . 


20 








26 

20 

5 

35 

13M 
















5 
















2H 




MipViioran fnasspH^ 




Minnesota (1 absent) 

Mississippi 


8 
20 
18 
6 
5 
6 
2 
28 


15 










Missouri (1 absent) 


17 
2 
2 










Nebraska 




9 








6 














6 
20 
24 

4 






New York 


70 












North Dakota 


2 

48 




4 


Ohio 




Oklahoma 






20 






10 
4 

1 

18 
3 






Pennsylvania (1 absent) . . . 
Rhode Island 


68 
9 


3 










S. Dakota (1 absent) 


5 


■■24' 


1 






40 

7 




Utah 


1 












Virginia (1 absent) 

Washington 


2M 


16 








Wisconsin 


23 
3 
6 
6 
6 
4 
5 


3 
3 










XlaskT 






Di<5+ nf rinliimhia 


















2 
1 

2 












Canal Zone 







.165 



FOR VICE-PRESIDENT 
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 
Was nominated by acclamation 

BALLOTS CAST IN PREVIOUS 

DEMOCRATIC CONVENTIONS 

IN THE PAST 

1832 — Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee, nominated by 

acclamation at Baltimore. 
1835 — Martin Van Buren, of New York, nominated on 

first ballot at Baltimore. 
1840 — Martin Van Buren, of New York, nominated by 

acclamation at Baltimore. 
1844 — James K. Polk, of Tennessee, nominated on ninth 

ballot at Baltimore. 
1848 — Lewis Cass, of Michigan, nominated on fourth ballot 

at Baltimore. 
1852 — Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, nominated 

on ninth ballot at Baltimore. 
1856 — James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania, nominated on 

seventeenth ballot at Cincinnati. 
1860 — Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois, led on fifty-seventh 

ballot. Convention then adjourned at Charleston, 

S. C, to reconvene at Baltimore, where Douglas 

was nominated on second ballot. 
1864 — George B. McClellan, of New Jersey, nominated on 

first ballot at Chicago. 
1868— Horatio Seymour, of New York, nominated on 

twenty-second ballot at New York. 
1872 — Horace Greeley, of New York, nominated on first 

ballot at Baltimore. 
1876 — Samuel J. Tilden, of New York, nominated on second 

ballot at St. Louis. 
1880 — Winfield S. Hancock, of Pennsylvania, nominated 

by acclamation after second ballot at Cincinnati. 
1884 — Grover Cleveland, of New York, nominated on second 

ballot at Chicago. 
1888 — Grover Cleveland, of New York, nominated by ac- 
clamation at St. Louis. 
1892— Grover Cleveland, of New York, nominated on the 

first ballot at Chicago. 
1896 — William J. Bryan, of Nebraska, nominated after 

the fifth ballot at Chicago. 
1900 — William J. Bryan, of Nebraska, nominated by ac- 
clamation at Kansas City. 
1904 — Alton B. Parker, of New York, nominated after 

first ballot at St. Louis. 
1908— William J. Bryan, of Nebraska, nominated after 

first ballot at Denver. 
1912 — Woodrow Wilson, of New Jersey, nominated on 

forty-sixth ballot at Baltimore. 
1916— Woodrow Wilson, of New Jersey, nominated by ac- 
clamation at St. Louis. 
1920— James M. Co.x, of Ohio, nominated on the 44th ballot. 

166 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF WARREN G. 
HARDING, U. S. SENATOR OF OHIO 

Republican Nominee for President of the 
United States 

Warren G. Harding was born on a farm near the 
village of Blooming Grove, Morrow county, 0., November 
2, 1865, the eldest of eight children. His father, George T. 
Harding, was a country doctor, whose forbears came from 
Scotland. Before going to Ohio the Hardings were resi- 
dents of Pensylvania, where some of them were massacred 
by Indians. Others fought in the Revolutionary war. 
The mother of Warren, Mrs. Phoebe Dickerson, was des- 
cended from an old-time Holland Dutch family, the Van 
Kirks. 

In his youth Warren Harding lived the life of a 
farmer boy, attending the village school until 14 years of 
age, when he entered Ohio Central College, of Iberia, from 
which he was graduated. As editor of the college paper 
he first displayed a talent for journalism. He was 
obliged to stop school now and then and earn money 
with which to pursue his college course. At one time 
he cut corn, at another painted barns, and at still 
another drove a team and helped to grade the roadbed of 
a new railway. At 17 he taught a district school and 
played a horn in the village band. 

At odd times he worked in the village printing office, 
in time becoming an expert typesetter, and later a linotype 
operator. He is a practical pressman and a job printer, 
and as a "make up man" is said to have few equals. The 
luck piece he has carried as a Senator is the old printer's 
rule he used when he was sticking type. 

In 1884 Dr. Harding moved his family to Marion. A 
short time afterwards the father purchased for Warren 
Harding the Star, then a small paper. 

On the paper Warren Harding performed every func- 
tion from devil to managing editor. In all the years the 
Senator has owned it there has never been a strike or a 
threatened one. 

Senator Harding is closely identified with many othei 
large business enterprises in Marion and other parts of the 
State. He is a director of a bank and several other large 
manufacturing plants, and is a trustee of the Trinity Bap' 
tist church. 

Mr. Harding has twice represented the Thirteentl 
Senatorial district of Ohio in the State Legislature, anc 
served one term as Lieutenant Governor. At the 1914 
election Harding was elected United States Senator by i 
majority of more thanlOO,000, running 73,000 ahead of th( 
next highest on the ticket. In the Senate he is a membei 
of the Committee on Foreign Relations. Nominated foi 
President of the United States at the Republican Conven- 
tion, held at Chicago, June 12, 1920. Senator Harding 
married Miss Florence Kling in 1891. He has alwayi 
been a resident of the State of Ohio. In private businesi 
life he is publisher of the Marion, (0.) Star. 
167 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 

of 

CALVIN COOLIDGE, GOVERNOR 

OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR VICE-PRESIDENT 

OF THE UNITED STATES. 

He was born in Plymouth, Vermont, July 4, 1872. 
His family was typical American, and behind him were 
generations of Massachusetts ancestors who had served 
their country in every emergency. He was educated at 
Amherst College. He was an able and industrious scholar. 
In his senior he won the first prize, a gold medal, for the 
best essay on the principles of the war for American 
Independence. This competition was open to the under- 
graduates of all American Colleges. 

He studied law in the law offices of Hammond & Field, 
in Northampton, Mass., and was admitted to the bar. As 
a boy he had worked hard on the farm. His willingness 
to work hard, his actual devotion to his duties as a lawyer 
in a small city, where reputation with one's fellow citizens 
is based on achievements rather than adjectives, fi.\ed his 
status as a member of the bar in whose membership were 
combined abihty, integrity, energy and purpose. 

Calvin Coolidge entered politics early in life in his 
home town, Northampton, Mass., in 1899. 

He has held the following offices: 

Member Northampton City Council 1899 

Northampton City Solicitor 1900, 1901 

State Representative 1907, 1908 

Mayor of Northampton 1910, 1911 

State Senator 1912,1913,1914,1915 

President of the Senate 1914, 1915 

Lieutenant Governor 1916, 1917, 1918 

Governor 1918, 1919, 1920 

Nominated for Vice-President of the United States at 
the Republican Convention held at Chicago June 12, 1920, 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 
of 
JAMES M. COX, GOVERNOR OF OHIO, 
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR PRESIDENT OF 
THE UNITED STATES. 
James Middleton Cox was b^rn on a farm near 
Jacksonburg, Butler county, Ohio, in 1870. He attended 
district school and held his first position as a teacher of the 
school in which he took his first lessons. He taught school 
three years. While attending school and during spare time he 
worked in a printing office, serving as a "printer's devil," 
etc. In a few years he resigned as school teacher and re- 
ceived his first assigimient on the reportorial staff of the 
"Cincinnati Enquirer." After serving ten years with the 
Enquirer he went to Washington as private secretary to 

168 



Congressman Paul Sorg, of Ohio. In 1898 he purchased 
the Dayton Daily News, borrowing most of the money to 
pay for it. Five years later he purchased the Springfield 
"Daily News;" thus becoming manager and owner of two 
newspapers. Since that time his connection with newspaper 
work has been constant. 

Business success paralleled his political achievements 
and through his own efforts Mr. Co.x has amassed a fortune. 

He bacame eventually a leader of the Democratic 
party in Ohio. In 1912 he was elected Governor of Ohio. 

He was three times elected and served as Governor — 
an honor enjoyed by only one other Ohioan, Rutherford 
B. Hayes, who eventually became President of the United 
States. Mr. Cox was also a member of Congress for three 
years. 

On July 4, 1920, he received the nomination for Presi- 
dent of the United States on the forty-fourth ballot at the 
Democratic Nations! Convention held at San Francisco, 
California. 

He recently purchased the farm near Jacksonburg 
Ohio, on which he was born, and has made it a modern 
farm home, where he expects to live on retirement from 
public life. He married twice. By his first wife he had 
three children (all living): he married second, in 1917, Mar- 
garet Blair, daughter of Thomas S. Blair, Jr., Chicago, HI. 

Address, until expiration of term as Governor, The 
Capitol, Columbus, Ohio. He built and maintains a 
beautiful home, "Trail's End," near Dayton, Ohio. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH 

of 

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, OF NEW YORK, 

DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR VICE PRESIDENT 

OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born in Hyde Park, 
near Poaughkeepsie, New York, January 30, 1882, the 
son of James and Sara Delano Roosevelt. He is a fifth 
cousin of the late President Colonel Theodore RoDsevelt, 
on his father's side, and related to the Astors through his 
mother. The family Roosevelt is of Dutch origin, the first 
to come from Holland to this country arriving in 1648. 
Their descendants intermarried with Flemish, Scotch and 
Irish people and were the first settlers of New York City 

Mr. Roosevelt was educated at Groton School, at 
Harvard University, where he graduated in 1904, with the 
degree of A. B., and at Coulmbia University Law School 

169 



in 1907, was admitted to the bar in the same year, and be- 
came the managing clerk of the law firm of Carter, Ledyard 
& Milburn, New York City. He remained in that position 
until 1910, when he became a member of the law firm of 
Marvin, Hooker & Roosevelt, with offices at 52 Wall Street, 
New York. 

Mr. Roosevelt sprang into political prominence in 1910 
when he was elected Senator, representing the twenty- 
eighth New York Senatorial District, consisting of the 
counties of Dutchess, Putnam and Columbia. He was re- 
elected 1912, but resigned his seat on March 17, 1913, to 
accept the appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 
His war work is unchallenged and navy attaches of the 
highest rank have commended his untiring services in the 
conflict with Germany. 

He was married March 17, 1905, to Miss Eleanor 
Roosevelt, of Germantown, Columbia county. New York, 
daughter of Eliot Roosevelt, and niece of the late President 
Theodore Roosevelt. They have five children. He is one 
of the leading parishioners of St. James Episcopal Church 
of Hyde Park, New York City: he is a member of the City, 
Harvard, Knickrbocker and Racquet and Tennis Clubs, and 
is affiliated with the Army and Navy, Metropolitan and 
University Clubs of Washington. 



170 



LOUISVILLE WELFARE LEAGUE 

of 

CHARITY ORGANIZATIONS. 

Below are named the forty-one organizations whicl 
have been announced as the 1919 endorsed list, those marke( 
with a star * being members of the Welfare League ani 
conducting a unified campaign for funds. The other organi 
zations either make individual appeals to the public a 
various times during the year or are entirely supported b; 
their own members. 

The Board of Trade, through its Charity Endorsemen 
Committee, commends all of these agencies to the public 
They meet the requirements of the committee in that the; 
are in charge of a board of managers, are well administerec 
properly account for their finances, have an annual audi 
of their accounts, and are rendering a needed service to o 
in behalf of the community: *Associated Charities; *Ba 
bies' Milk Fund Association; Booker T. Washingto: 
Community Center; Cabbage Patch Settlement House 
♦Catholic Orphans' Society, maintaining St. Vincen 
Orphanage and St. Thomas Orphanage; *Children's Fre 
Hospital; ^Children's Protective Association; *Colorei 
Orphan's Home; *Consumers' League of Kentucky; *Di£ 
trict Nurse Association ; *East End Day Nursery; *Eleano 
Tarrant Little Foundation; *Fresh Air Home; *Home o 
the Innocents; Hope Rescue Mission; *Jennie Casseda; 
Rest Cottage; *Jewish Welfare Federation; *Kentuck: 
Child Labor Association; *Kentucky Children's Home So 
ciety; *Kentucky Humane Society; *King's Daughters 
Home for Incurables; Lincoln Institute; '■Louisville Anti 
Tuberculosis Association; Louis\alle Council of Boy Scouts 
♦Louisville League of Parent-Teacher Associations; *Louis 
ville Wesley House; *Neighborhood House; *Plymout] 
Social Settlement House; *Presbyterian Colored Mission 
Red Cross Association; St. Joseph's Orphans' Society; St 
Lawrence Institute; St. Vincent de Paul Society; *Salva 
tion Army Citadel; *Salvation Army; Susan Speed Davi 
Home; *Union Gospel Mission; Visitation Home; *Welfar 
League; Young Men's Christian Association; Young Men'i 
Hebrew Association; Young Women's Christian Association 



171 



>e 



- s 

^,*S «« « 2 '^ 3 5 3 S 31^ SrS 3 3^ P o S 






IS.I>|iJl1lgl1|il|5i.|l| 






2— a 

Co 



o e: S 5-S.5-S 3 2-3 i^ S-5 S^-S 3 a S S S 



mmmm 



: >>>.a . 



III 






lO <-( »-i OS 0> "5 O ■ 



) CO Tl< CO <o ■*■<»« c 



5 -S-SS o i 



:|=1 



SJsJ. 









2 ^-3 5?'2 §^ o §^^ a § S-g S'a'g-S 3^ a 



2 

a S« 



I Cq M ■'flUS CO 



172 



1 -^S -^ o B-2« go S Hja 

^ljlKliPiillll1i|l|1i! 







S H-" ass o^ 3 fc^^ g 5 S3 i;-_3 «14 S 2 ok^-S.S 



^ th CO CO »i CO -^t CO 1-^ i-H CO cociic<iesi 4<-4(-4i 

C^05e^«OI>.000500000lM»OOOCOlOO»'»*<CO»«'^rJ*(— (Osctj 

.;^o.-HOOooO'7<07<'7<oooooooooi=!oo 



50-*eot*«o-«n«o>oe<5i»oooot^t^t^oo«)>ooj<»ooc^t^ 



I 
o 

3'^ . s 






a g o o £► 






:l 









■£ a 






iOOOOOOOO< 



iOrtC^CO'»l>iO«Ot^00050 
) O O) 03 O^ Od o^ o^ o> C^ C^ o^ 



173 



DEEDS RECORDED IN LOUISVILLE 1918-19-20. 

The table below shows the comparative figures of the 

number of realty transfers by month for the years 1918, 
1919 and 1920. 

1918 1919 1920 

January ' 357 852 1.304 

February 578 844 1,190 

March 783 1,147 1,868 

April 1,018 1,501 1,830 

May 891 1,312 1,697 

June 818 1,494 1,297 

July 814 1,333 1,650 

August 768 1,390 1,233 

Seotember 671 1,418 1,356 

October 694 1,705 1,342 

November 515 895 1,250 

December 394 759 1,255 

Totals 8,301 14,561 17,272 

The 17,272 deeds recorded in 1920 represented a value 
of about $103,632,000. 

Assessments on Louis\'ille real estate for 1919 are based 
upon a land valuation of S6o,000,000, improvement valua- 
tion of 586,500,000, and the balance of 8242,000,000 on 
personalty, franchises, railroad property, etc. 

This represents an increase oi $164,119 on land and 
55,988,118 on improvements over 1918 valuations. 

Real estate men say that modern residence property 
has increased from 30 to 60 per cent in value during the year; 
business property in the retail section 10 per cent, and fac- 
tory property 25 per cent. 



174 



I C^l lO »ClO> 



'ii •«*< t^ 00 M O 03 CO <0 50 CO -i* CO 

S <N 0<M to t^tOl^ >C lO <M (M O 

K OO Oi M -^ CO CT> 00 O CO t~ <N .-( 

O M<0005CCO'»»<050505CDt^lO 



c4 (>q O CO »-l t- O 05 O "-I O CO 0> 

>_5 .-H c^j r^ oi CO oo 'O o oo CO o: CO 

^ O (N ^-H t^ CO t^ <N CO CO «0 (M CO 

S orcTo'c^ o"<M"-^'oo"c>i 22 o't-T 

h^ CO ■* »0 CO CO t~^ CD «0 t^ C> t^ T*( 

1^ 05 O »0 ■* »0 C^ 00 »-l Oi -^ CO o 

-S t^COT»<COMCO<N(Mrt<Mrtrt 



lO < 



ICO 



O ■*! 

y-i CO 

i-T CO 
05 ^ 

COt^ 



> ca in 00 o »-i o o 



i_^ loiocooot^^oicooo 

o 



CO 05 i— 1 CO r^ T-l C5 
Oi— lcOlOTj<t^COCOOCO^HCO 



iC CO 
O CO 
00 CO 

00 (N 



2 

so --a 






3 S-S' 






175 



GRAIN RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS 

For the purpose of comparison, the list below will 
show the comparative receipts and shipments from the 
Louisville market for the years 1916, 1917, 1918 and 1919: 

Receipts. 

1916 1917 1918 1919 

Corn 4,507 3,374 2,130 2,619 

Oats 4,361 4,115 6,307 4,665 

Wheat 4,460 3,557 3,338 4,643 

Rye 312 134 167 150 

Totals 13,640 11,180 11,942 12,077 

Shipments. 

1916 1917 1918 1919 

Corn 3,261 1,593 773 909 

Oats 4,262 3,654 5,341 5,438 

Wheat 343 156 35 128 

Rye 200 105 11 95 

Totals 8,066 5,508 6,160 6,570 

The volume of business handled for the year compares 
very favorably with previous years, both as to receipts and 
shipments. The decrease in the quantity of corn nandled 
is due very largely to the cessation of the manufacture of 
whiskey and alcohol, and the decrease in the quantity 
of rye handled is largely due to the same cause. 



STATISTICS OF LOUISVILLE AND OF KENTUCKY 
FOR 1919. 



Louisville banking transactions S3, 716, 379, 941 

Louisville 1919 bank clearings 928, 955 , 863 

Louisville retail trade *30,000,000 

Kentucky oil production *20 , 000 , 000 

Kentucky's principal crops *300,000,000 

Louisville livestock receipts *80 , 000 , 000 

Louisville manufactured products *260,000,000 

Louisville building operations *4, 038, 664 

Kentucky property, assessed valuation .... 1 , 996 , 300 , 000 

Kentucky revenues for past fiscal year 12.257,985 

Kentucky State bank deposits 161,392,914 

Kentucky corn crop *127,000,000 

Kentucky tobacco crop *loO , 000 , 000 

Kentucky tame hay crop *39, 649,000 

Kentuckv wheat crop *25,381,000 

Kentuckv potato crop *10,584,000 

Kentucky oats crop *9, 099, 000 

Kentucky sorghum syrup 2,688,000 

*Estimated. 



176 



WEALTHY PEOPLE OF LOUISVILLE. 

Louisville has a larger percentage of population worth 
•55,000 or more than any other city in the country, for 
which figures are submitted, according to a tabulation 
prepared by the Stark-Lowman Company, of this city. 
The figures were compiled by one of the national insurance 
agencies. Among the astounding things shown are that 
Louisville has more persons worth $5,000 or over than 
Pittsburgh and more than twice as many as Indianapolis. 
This is an epitome of the figures: 

Worth One 

$5,000 for 

or over every 

Louisville 11,920 23 

Seattle 7,880 30 

Cincinnati 9,888 42 

Kansas City, Mo 7,024 42 

Indianapolis 4,992 46 

Los Angeles 8,597 44 

Cleveland 14,950 45 

Milwaukee 8, 164 40 

Pittsburgh 11,582 49 

Buffalo 8,838 49 

Washington 7,032 52 

San Francisco 10,800 55 

New Orleans 6,241 55 

Newark, N.J 6,136 56 

Minneapolis 5,254 57 



TOBACCO. 
Louisville Statistics of Operations. 

Louisville figures are here presented for the past four 
years: 

Offerings. 

Hogsheaos 
1919 74,541 

1918 57,098 

1917 42,417 

1916 69,052 

Actual Sales. 

1919 ...". 63,208 

1918 50,571 

1917 37,870 

1916 55,842 

Sales Burley. 

1919 66,206 

1918 50,525 

1917 37,846 

1916 60,861 

177 



Sales Dark. 
1919 68,335 

1918 6,573 

1917 4,571 

1916 8,191 

Crop Sales-~Original Ins. 

1919 61,186 

1918 52,647 

1917 39,001 

1916 42,298 

Receipts. 

1919 65,296 

1918 51,838 

1917 35,863 

1916 52,810 

Rejections. 

1919 11,333 

1918 6,527 

1917 4,547 

1916 13,210 

Rejections, Burley. 

1919 10,401 

1918 5,689 

1917 4,059 

1916 12,002 

Rejections, Dark. 

1919 932 

1918 838 

1917 488 

1916 1,208 

Stock December 31, 1919. 

1919 15,745 

1918 4,297 

1917 5,072 

1916 7,358 

Unsold Stock December 31, 1919. 
1919- 9,088 

1918 2,440 

1917 1,663 

1916 1,750 

Unsold Buriey. 

1919 8,226 

1918 1,703 

1917 1,576 

1916 1,705 

Unsold Dark. I 

1919 782 

1918 : 720 

1917 87 

1916 44 

Unsold Green River. 

1919 80 

1918 17 

1917 

1916 1 

178 



USEFUL INFORMATION 



To find diameter of a circle multiply circumference b 
.31S31. 

To find circumference of a circle multiply diameter h 
3.1416. 

To find area of a circle multiply square of diameter h 
.7854. 

To find surface of a ball multiply square of diameter b 
3.1416. 

To find side of an equal square multiply diameter b 
.8862. 

To find cubic inches in a ball multiply cube of diameti 
by .5236. 

Doubling the diameter of a pipe increases its capacil 
four times. 

Double riveting is from 16 to 20 per cent, stronger tha 
single. 

One cubic foot of anthracite coal weighs about 53 pound 

One cubic foot of bituminous coal weighs from 47 to I 
pounds. 

One ton of coal is equivalent to two cords of wood f( 
steam purposes. 

A gallon of water (U. S. Standard) weights 8 1-3 lbs. ac 
contains 231 cubic inches. 

There are nine square feet of heating surface to eac 
square foot of grate surface. 

A cubic foot of water contains 7 1-2 gallons, 1728 cub 
inches, and weighs 62 1-2 lbs. 

Each nominal horse power of a boiler requires 30 to 3 
lbs. of water per hour. 

To sharpen dull files lay them in dilute sulphuric aci 
until they are eaten deep enough. 

A horse power is equivalent to raising 33,000 lbs. or 
ft. per minute, or 550 lbs. one ft. per second. 

The average consumption of coal for steam boilers 
12 lbs. per hour for each sq. ft. of grate surface. 

To find the pressure in pounds per square inch of 
column of water, multiply the height of the column i 
feet by .434. 

Steam rising from water at its boiling point (212 di 
grees) has a pressure equal to the atmosphere (14.7 lb 
to the square inch). 

To evaporate one cubic foot of water requires the coi 
sumption of 7 1-2 lbs. of ordinary coal, or about 1 lb. ( 
coal to 1 gallon of water. 

One-sixth of tensile strength of plate multiplied b 
thickness of plate and divided by one-half the diamet( 
of boiler gives safe working pressure for tubular boiler 
For marine boilers add 20 per cent, for drilled holes. 

No plate or bars of either Steel or Iron should be worke 
at a black or blue heat (say about 500 degrees); the m; 
terial will stand far more strain either red hot or col( 
while at an intermediate point great risks will be run, an 
possibly strains produced which result in rupture later on. 

179 



COPYRIGHT LAW OF THE UNITED STATES 

The copyright law approved March 4, 1909, which took 
effect on July 1, 1909, provides that the application for 
registration of any work "shall specify to which of the 
following classes the work in which copyright is claimed 
belongs." 

Subject Matter 

(a) Books, including composite and cyclopaedic works, 
directories, gazetteers, and other compilations; (b) period- 
icals, including newspapers; (c) lectures, sermons, address- 
es, prepared for oral delivery; (d) dramatic or dramatico- 
musical compositions; (e) musical compositions; (f) maps; 
(g) works of art; models or designs for works of art; (h) re- 
productions of a work of art; (i) drawings or plastic works 
of a scientific or technical character; (j) photographs; (k) 
prints and pictorial illustrations. 

The Amendment of August 24, 1912, adds: (1) motion 
picture photoplays; (m) motion pictures other than photo- 
plays. 

The application for registration of any article should 
distinctly specify to which one of these classes th^ work 
belongs. An article is not entitled to registration unless 
it is reasonably possible to class it under one or the other 
of the designations named in the statute. 

To Secure Copyright Registration. 

For works reproduced in copies for sale: 1. Publish the 
work with the copyright notice. 2. Promptly after pub- 
lication, send to the Copyright Office, Library of Congress, 
Washington,D.C., two copies of the best edition of the work, 
with an application for registration. In the case of motion 
picture photo-plays and of motion pictures other than photo- 
plays a description of the work must be filed and a money 
order payable to the Register of Copyrights for the statutory 
registration fee of $1. 

In the case of books by American authors, or permanent 
residents of the United States, the copies deposited must be 
accompanied by an affidavit, under the official seal of an 
officer authorized to administer oaths, stating that the 
typesetting, printing and binding of the book have been 
performed within the United States. Affidavit and appli- 
cation forms will be suppUed by the copyright office on 
request. 

For works not reproduced in copies for sale; Copyright 
may also be had of certain classes of works (see a, b, c, be- 
low) of which copies are not reproduced for sale, by filing 
in the Copyright Office an application for registration, with 
the statutory fee of SI, sending therewith: (a) In the case 
of lectures or other oral addresses or of dramatic or musical 
compositions, one complete manuscript or typewritten copy 
of the work. This privilege of registration, however, does 
not exempt the copyright proprietor from the deposit of 
printed copies of a dramatic or musical composition or 
lecture when the work is later reproduced in copies for sale, 
(b) In the case of photographs not intended for general 
circulation, one photographic print, (c) In the case of 
works of art (paintings, drawings, sculpture); or of draw- 

180 



ings or plastic works of a scientific or technical character, 
one photograph or other identifying reproduction of the 
work. In the case of a motion picture photo-play, a title and 
description and one print taken from each scene or act. 
In case of a motion picture other than a photo-play a title 
and description with not less than two prints to be taken 
from different sections of a complete motion picture. In 
all these cases, if the work is later reproduced in copies for 
sale, two copies must then be deposited. 
Copyright Fees. 

For registration of any work subject to copyright, $1, 
which sum is to include a certificate of registration under 
seal. But only one registration at one fee is required in 
the case of several volumes of the same book deposited in 
the Copyright Office at the same time. For every addition- 
al certificate of registration, or copy of record under seal, 
50 cents. In the case of photographs the fee shall be 50 
cents where a certificate is not requested. For recording 
and certifying an assigmnent of copyright, or for a certified 
copy of an assignment, $1, if the instrument is not over 
three hundred words in length; if more than three hundred 
and less than one thousand words in length, $2; if more 
than one thousand words in length, $1 additional for each 
additional one thousand words or fraction thereof over 
three hundred words. For comparing a copy of an as- 
signment with the record of such document in the Copy- 
right OfSce and certifying the same under seal, $1. For 
recording the transfer of the proprietorship of copyright 
articles, 10 cents for each title of a book or other article, 
in addition to the fee prescribed for recording the instru- 
ment of assignment. For recording an extension or re- 
newal of copyright, 50 cents. Remittances should be made 
by money-order payable to the Register of Copyrights 
Forms for application for copyright registration will be 
furnished on request. 

Duration of Copyright. 

The original term of copyright runs for twenty-eight 
years. Within one year prior to the expiration of the orig- 
inal term, the author, if living, or the widow or widower 
of the author, or the children of the author if he be not 
living; or if none of these be living then the author's exec- 
utors, or in the absence of a will, the author's next kin 
may secure a renewal for a further term of twenty-eight 
years, making fifty-six years in all. In case of composite 
works, if the proprietor secured the original copyright, he 
may also secure the renewal. 

Assignments. 

Copyrights are assignable by an instrument of writing. 
Every assignment of copyright must be recorded in the 
Copyright Office within three calendar months after its 
execution in the United States or within six calendar 
months after its execution without the limits of the United 
States, "in default of which it shall be void as against any 
subsequent purchaser or mortgagee for a valuable consid- 
eration, without notice, whose assignment has been duly 
recordeid" 

181 



BUSINESS LAWS. 

Contracts made on Sunday cannot be enforced. Written 
contracts concerning land must be under seal. 

Notes do not bear interest unless it is so stated. 

If a note is lost or stolen, the maker is not released if 
the consideration and amount can be proved. 

Demand notes are payable when presented, without 
grace, and bear legal interest after a demand, if not so 
written. 

An endorser on a demand note can be held only for a 
limited time, variable in different States. 

To be negotiable a note must either be made payable 
to bearer or be properly endorsed by the person to whose 
order it is made. 

If the endorser desires to avoid responsibility he can 
endorse "without recourse." 

Notes becoming due on Sunday or a legal holiday are, 
as a rule, payable on the day following. 

A note made on Sunday, or one dated ahead of its issue, 
is void, but it may be dated back. 

If a note is altered in any way by the holder, it becomes 
void. 

A note made by a minor is void in some states and is 
voidable on judicial decision in others. 

A contract with a minor or a lunatic is void. 

If a note is not paid when due, the endorsers, if any, 
should be legally notified to be holden. 

A note obtained by fraud or given by an intoxicated 
person cannot be collected. 

It is a fraud to conceal a fraud. 

Signatures with a lead pencil are good in law. 

The acts of one partner bind the others. 

Each individual in a partnership is responsible for all 
the debts of the firm except in the case of a special partner- 
ship. 

The word "limited" in connection with firm names 
indicates a limitation of responsibility for each member. 

An agreement without consideration of value is void. 

"Value received" should be written in a note, but it 
is not necessary. WTien not written it is presumed by law 
or may be shown by proof. 

A consideration is not sufficient in law if it is illegal in 
its nature. 

An endorser of a note is exempt from liability if not 
served with a notice of its dishonor within 24 hours of its 
non-payment. 

If a letter containing a notice of protest of non-payment 
be put in the Post Office, any miscarriage does not affect 
the party giving notice. 

Notice of protest may be sent either to the place of 
business or residence of the party notified. 

A receipt for money is not legally conclusive. 



182 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL HINTS 

By C. G. CAPRON. M. D. 
Surgeon-in-Chief C, T. M. A. A. of America. 

1. Procrastination is the thief of time; when injured, 
do not "take a chance." Have advice at once. By so doing 
you may save much suffering and many dollars. 

2. For Sprains— Irrigation, emersion, or pack in hot 
water, complete rest; after swelling and pain lessen, apply 
antiphlogistine. When swelling is well reduced, strap 
injured part with o. z. (zinc oxide) adhesive plaster. 

3. For Dog Bites — Cauterize with strong nitric or 
carbolic acid. If these can not be had, use a live coal or 
red hot iron. Dress antiseptically. 

4. For Insect Stings — Apply locally aromatic spirits 
of ammonia, strong solution baking soda, antiphlogistine. 

5. For Punctured Wounds — Use a solution of bromine, 
1 to 50. Of this solution 1 teaspoonful to 2 ozs. of water, 
apply with wet dressing, and keep it damp. Bichloride of 
mercury, 1 to 5000 solution, dressing to be kept wet. 

6. For Hemorrhage Following Wounds— Do the safe 
thing; constrict the circulation both above and below the 
wound. 

7. When your Hernia comes down, and you can not 
reduce after trying for 10 minutes, a physician and a few 
whiffs of chloroform will do it for you. 

8. For Burns — Home remedies are often most efBca- 
cious. First cover the burned area with sweet (table) oil 
then apply plenty of baking soda and bandages. By the 
time the doctor arrives, you may not need him 

9. For Nose Bleed —Ice to back of neck, snuff alum 
water, inhale spirits of camphor, plug nostrils with cotton 
saturated with diluted vinegar. 

10. For Fainting — Fresh air, clothing loose, head low 
give aromatic spirits of ammonia, one-half to one tea- 
spoonful in a swallow of water, also equal parts of whiskej 
and water. 

11. For Colic or Pain in Bowels— Don't get "stag( 
fright" about your appendix; take one or two tablespoonfuli 
of castor oil, followed by glass of hot water; repeat this dosi 
in three or four hours if necessary. An occasional dose o 
this remedy "like mother used to give" may save you! 
appendix from the hands of a surgeon. 

12. Remember that alcohol externally is one of our bes 
antiseptics. After scrubbing the hands, pour alcohol ove 
them before you dress an open wound. 

13. Remember every "grip" should contain aromatii 
spirits of ammonia, and a First Aid to the Injured package 
They may be more essential than apparel. 



183 



OUTLYING POSSESSIONS OF U. S. 

Alaska 64,757 

Guam 12,866 

Hawaii 219,902 

Panama Canal Zone 31 , 160 

Philippine Islands 8,742,562 

Porto Rico 1 ,200,286 



Population of Blacks in Leading American Cities: 

Washington 94,446 

New York 91,709 

New Orleans 89,206 

Baltimore 84,789 

Birmingham 52,305 

Atlanta 51,902 

Richmond 46.733 

Chicago 44.103 

St. Louis 43,960 

Louisville 40.522 

Nashville 36,523 

Pittsburg 25.623 

Kansas City 23.566 

Indianapolis 21.516 

Cincinnati 19,639 

Boston 13.561 

Columbus 12.739 

Newark 9.475 

Cl.-veland 8,488 

Denver 5,426 



184 



POPUUTION OF UNITED STATES BY STATES, 
1910 CENSUS WITH PER CENT INCREASE 

Population of the U. S. 1920, 105,000,000 (estimated 
by the Chief Statistician of the Census Bureau). 

1920 Census taken but population not announced at 
the time of going to press (August 1920). The population of 
only 300 cities over 10,000 inhabitants had been announced. 



STATE 


1910 


Per 
Cent 
Inc. 


1900 


The U. S. (incl. of 
Alaska, Hawaii and 
Porto Rico. MUitary 


93.402,151 

91,972,266 

2,138,093 

204,354 
1,574,449 
2,377,549 

799,024 
1,114,756 

202,322 

331,069 

752,615 
2,609,121 

325,594 
5,638,591 
2,700,876 
2,224,771 
1,690,949 
2,289,905 
1,656,388 

742,371 
1,295,346 
3,366,416 
2,810,173 
2,075,708 
1,797,114 
3,293,335 

376,053 

1,192,214 

81,875 

430,572 
2,537,167 

327.396 
9.113,614 
2.206,287 

577.056 
4,767.121 
1.657,155 

672,765 
7,665.111 

542.610 


20.9 
21.0 
16.9 
66.2 
20.0 
60.1 
48.0 
22.7 

9.5 
18.8 
42.4 
17.7 
101.3 
16.9 

7.3 
*0.3 
15.0 

6.6 
19.9 

6.9 

9.0 
20.0 
16.1 
18.5 
15.8 

6.0 
41.2 
11.8 
93.4 

4.6 
34.7 
67.6 
25.4 
16.5 
80.8 
14.7 
109.7 
62.7 
21.6 
26.6 


77,256,630 


Continental, U. S 

Alabama .... 


75,994,575 
1,828,697 




122,931 


Arkansas 


1,311,564 




1,485,053 


Colorado 


537,700 


Connecticut 


908,420 
184,735 


District of Columbia... 
Florida . . 


278.718 
528.542 




2,216,331 


Idaho 


161,772 




4,821,550 


Indiana 


2,516,462 


Iowa . . . 


2,231,853 




1,470,495 


Kentucky 


2,147,174 




1,381,645 


Maine 


694,466 


Maryland . . . . 


1,188,044 


Massachusetts 

Michigan 


2,805,346 
2,420,982 




1.751.394 


Mississippi 


1.551.270 




3.106.665 


Montana 

Nebraska 


243,329 
1,066,300 


Nevada 


42.335 


New Hampshire 

New Jersey . . . 


411.588 
1,883.669 




195.310 


New York 


7.268.894 


North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio . . . .. 


1.893.810 

319,146 

4,157.545 




790.391 


Oregon 


413.536 


Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 


6.302.115 
428.556 



185 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES BY STATES, 

1910 CENSUS WITH PER CENT 

INCREASE— Continued 



STATE 



1910 



Per 
Cent 
Inc. 



1900 



South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington. 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Alaska 

Hawaii 

Porto Rico 

Military and Naval. 
Panama Republic.. 



1,515 

583 
2.184 
3,896 

373 

355 
2,061 
1,141 
1,221 
2,333 

145 
64 

191 

1,118 

55 

t401 



.400 


13.1 


,888 


45.4 


,789 


8.1 


,542 


27.8 


,351 


35.0 


,956 


3.6 


,612 


11.2 


,990 


120.4 


119 


27.4 


,860 


12.7 


,965 


57.7 


,356 


1.2 


,909 


24.6 


,012 


16.2 


,608 


t39.2 


,428 


33.0 



1,340,316 
401,570 

2 020,616 

3,048,710 
276.749 
343,641 

1,854.184 
518.103 
958,800 

2,069,042 
92,531 
63,592 
154.001 
953,243 
91.219 



♦Decrease. 

tDoes not include Indians. 



UNITED STATES (1920) CENSUS— CITIES OF 10,000 
AND OVER. 



Aberdeen, S.D 14,537 

Aberdeen, Wash.... 13,660 

Abilene, Tenn 10,274 

Adrian, Mich 11.878 

Adams, Mass 13,026 

Akron, 208,425 

Alameda, Cal 28,806 

Albany, N.Y 113,334 

Albuquerque, N. M. 15,157 
Allegheny, Pa (See 
Pittsburgh). 

Allentown,Pa 73,502 

Alexandria, La 17,510 

Alexandria, Va 18,329 

Alliance, 21,603 

Alpena, Mich 12,706 

Alton, 111 24,682 

Altoona, Pa 60,127 

Amsterdam, N. Y . . 31,267 



Anaconda, Mont.... 11,663 

Anderson, Ind 29,476 

Ann Arbor, Mich .. . 19,516 

Anniston, Ala 17,734 

Ansonia, Conn. . . . . 17,643 

Appleton, Wis 19,773 

Ardmore, Okla 14,181 

Argenta,Ark 11,138 

Arkansas City, Ark. . 11 , 263 
Arlington, Mass. .. . 18,065 
AsburvPark,N. J.. 12,400 

AsheviIle,N.C 28,504 

Ashland, Ky 14,729 

Ashland, Wis 11,334 

Ashtabula, 22,082 

Astoria, Ore 14,027 

Atchison, Kan 12,630 

Athens, Ga 16,748 

Atlanta, Ga 200,617 



186 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS— 1920— CITIES ( 
10,000 AND OVER 



Atlantic City, N. J . 50,150 

Attleboro, Mass 19,731 

Auburn, Me 16,985 

Augusta, Ga 52,548 

Augusta, Me 14,414 

Auburn, N.Y 36,192 

Aurora, 111 36,3^7 

Austin, Minn 10,118 

Austin, Tex 34,860 

Bakersneld, Cal.... 18,638 

Baltimore, Md 733,826 

Bangor, Me 24,803 

Barre, Vt 10,734 

Barberton, 18,811 

Bartlesville, Okla .. 14,417 

Batavia, N. Y 13,541 

Bath, Me 14,731 

Baton Rouge, La. . . 21,782 
Battle Creek, Mich. 36,144 
Bav City, Mich.... 47,554 

Bayonne, N.J 76,754 

Beaumont, Tex 40,640 

Beaver Falls, Pa.... 12,802 

Bellaire, 15,061 

Bellingham, Wash . 24,298 

Beloit, Wis 21,284 

Biloxi, Miss 10,987 

Belleville, 111 24,711 

Berkeley, Cal 55,886 

Berlin, N.H 16,104 

Bessemer, A lo 18,674 

Bethlehem, Pa 50,358 

Berwyn, 111 14,150 

Beverlv, Mass 22,561 

Biddeford, Me 18,008 

Billings, Mont 10,031 

Binghamton, N. Y. . 66,800 
Birmingham, Ala. . .178,270 
Bloomfield, N. J.... 22,019 
Bloomington, 111... . 28,726 
Bluefield, W. Va.... 15,191 

Blue Island, 111 11,424 

Boise, Idaho 21,393 

Boone, la 12,451 

Boston, Mass 747,923 

Bowling Green, Ky. 9,638 

Braddock, Pa 20,789 

Bradford, Pa 15,525 

Bridgeport, Conn... 143, 152 

Bridgeton, N. J 14,323 

Bristol, Conn 20,620 

Bristol, Pa 10,273 



Bristol, R.I 11,3 

Brockton, Mass. ... 66,2 
Brooklyn, N. Y ..2,018,3 

Brownsville, Tex 11,5 

Brookline, Mass . . . . 37,7 

Brunswick, Ga 14,4 

Buffalo, N.Y .505,8 

Burlington, la 24,0 

Burlington, Vt 20, 4i 

Butler, Pa 23,7 

Butte, Mont 41,6 

Cairo, 111 15, 2( 

Cambridge, Mass. . . 109,6! 

Cambridge, 13 , 1( 

Camden, N.J 116,3( 

Canton, 111 10, 4i 

Canton, 87, Oi 

Carbondale, Pa 18,6' 

Carlisle, Pa 10, 3( 

Carnegie. Pa 10, 0( 

Carthage, Mo 10, 0( 

Casper, Wyo 11,4^ 

Cedar Rapids, la. . . 45, 5( 
CentralFalls, R. I.. 24, i: 

Charlotte, N. C 46,3? 

Chambersburg, Pa . . 13 , 11 

Champaign, 111 15,8] 

Charleston, S.C... 67, 9^ 
Charleston, W.Va.. 39, 6( 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 57, 8f 
Cheltenham, Pa. ... 11,01 

Chelsea, Mass 32, 4^ 

Chester, Pa 58,0c 

Cheyenne, Wyo ... . 13, 8i 

Chicago, 111 2,701,2] 

Chicago Heights, 111 19, 6^ 
Chickasha, Okla.... 10,32 

Chicopee.Mass 36,27 

Chillicothe, 14, 5C 

Cicero, 111 14,5^ 

Cincinnati, 401,24 

Clarksburg, W.Va.. 27, 8f 

Cleburne, Tex 12,82 

Cleveland, 796,83 

Cleveland Heights, 15,22 

Clinton, la 24,15 

Clinton, Mass 13,07 

Clinton, Ind 10,96 

Coatesville, Pa 14,51 

Coffey ville,Kans... 13, 4S 

Cohoes, N. Y 22,98 

Colo. Springs, Colo. 30, IC 



187 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS— 1920— CITIES OF 
10.000 AND OVER— Continued 

Elmira, N. Y 45,393 



Columbia, Pa 


10,236 


Columbus, Ga 


31,125 


Columbus, Miss . . . 


10,501 


Columbus, 


237,031 


Columbia, S.C... 


37,524 


Concord, N.H.... 


21,497 


ConnellsviUe, Pa... 


12,845 


Corning, N.Y 


15,730 


Corpus Christi, Tex 


10,522 


Cortland, N. Y. . . . 


13,294 


Coshocton, 


. 10,847 


Council Bluffs, la.. 


. 36,162 


Covington, Ky 


. 57,121 


Cranston, R.I 


29,407 


Cumberland, Md.. 


. 29,397 


Cumberland, R. I . 


. 10,047 


Dallas, Tex 


.158,976 


Danbury,Conn (city) 18,943 


Danbury,Conn.(town)23 , 502 


Danville, 111 


. 33,871 


Danville, V'a 


. 19,020 


Davenport, la 


. 56,028 


Dayton, 


.153,830 


Decatur, 111 


. 43,818 


Del Rio, Tex 


. 10,589 


Denison, Tes 


. 17,632 


Denver, Colo 


.256,369 


Des Moines, la 


.126,468 


Detroit, Mich 


.993,739 


Dickson City, Pa . . 


. 11,049 


Donora, Pa 


. 14,131 


Dothan, Ala 


. 10,034 


Dover, N.H 


. 13,247 


Dubois, Pa 


. 12,623 


Dubuque, la 


. 38,494 


Duluth, Minn 


. 98,917 


Durham, N. C. . . 


. 21,719 


Dunkirk, N. Y. . . 


. 19,336 


Dunmore, Pa 


. 20,250 


Duquesne, Pa 


. 19,011 


E. Chicago, Ind. . 


. 35,967 


East Cleveland, 


. 27,292 


E. Liverpool, 0... 


. 20,387 


East Orange, N. J 


. 50,371 


Easton, Pa 


. 33,523 


E. Providence, R. . 


. 21,793 


E.St. Louis, 111... 


. 66,440 


Eau Claire, Wis.. 


. 20,310 


Ecorse, Mich 


. 22,911 


Elgin 111 


25,976 


Elizabeth, N.J... 


. 96,682 


Elkhart, Ind 


. 24,277 



El Paso, Texas . 
Elwood, Ind.... 



77,543 
10,790 

Elyria, 20,474 

Englewood, N. J.... 11,617 

Enid, Okla 13,799 

Erie, Pa 93,372 

Escanaba, Mich 13, 194 

Eugene, Ore 10,193 

Eureka, Cal 13,212 

Evanston, 111 37,215 

Evansville, Ind 85 , 264 

Everett, Mass 40, 109 

Everett, Wash 24 , 814 

Fairmont, W.Va. .. 17,851 
Fall River, Mass .... 120 , 485 

Fargo, No. Dak 21,961 

Farrel, Pa 15,115 

Findlay, 17,915 

Fitchburg, Mass 41 ,029 

Flint, Mich 91,599 

Florence, Ala 10,968 

Fond du Lac, Wis . . 23 , 797 

Fort Dodge, la 19,347 

Fort Madison, Texas 12,066 
Fort Scott, Kans ... 10,693 
Fort Smith, Ark.... 28,811 
Fort Wayne, Ind. . . 86,933 
Fort Worth, Tex. . . . 106,482 
Framingham, Mass. 17,033 

Frankfort, Ky 9,805 

Frederick, Md 11,066 

Fremont, 12,468 

Freeport, 111 19,669 

Fresno, Cal 44,616 

Fulton, N.Y 13,043 

Gadsden, Ala 14,737 

Galesburg, 111 23,834 

Galveston, Texas .. . 44,255 

Gardner, Mass 16,721 

Garfield, N.J 19,381 

Gary, Ind 55,378 

Geneva, N. Y 14,648 

Glen Falls, N. Y. .. . 16,638 

Glendale, Cal...... 13,536 

Gloversville, N. Y . 22,075 
Gloucester, Mass. . . 22,947 
Goldsboro, N. C... 11,296 
Grand Forks, N. D 14,010 
Grand Island, Neb.. 13,960 
Granite City, 111. .. . 14,757 

Grand Rapids, Mich 137,634 



188 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS— 1920— CITIES 
10,000 AND OVER— Continued 



OF 



Great Falls, Mont . . 


24,171 


Greely, Col 


10,883 


Green Bay, Wis 


31,017 


Greenfield, Mass — 


15,462 


Greensboro, N. C. . . 


15,895 


Greensburg, Pa 


13,012 


Greenville, S. C. . . 


15,741 


Greenwich, Conn. . 


22,123 


Guthrie, Okla 


11,757 


Hackensack.N.J.. 


17,667 


Hagerstown, Md... 


28,066 


Hamilton, 


35,279 


Hammond, Ind 


36,925 


Hamtrameh, Mich. 


48,615 


Hannibal, Mo 


18,950 


Harrisburg, Pa ... . 


75,917 


Harrison, N. J 


14,498 


Hartford, Conn. . . . 


138,036 


Hattiesburg, Miss . 


. 13,270 


Haverhill, Mass... 


. 53,884 


Hawaii 


.255,912 


Hazelton, Pa 


. 25,452 


Helena, Mont 


. 12,515 


Henderson, Ky 


. 12,169 


Herrin,Ill 


..10,986 


Highland Pk., Mich 


. 46,599 


Hilo 


10,432 


Hoboken, N. J.... 


. 68,166 


Holland, Mich 


. 12,166 


Holyoke, Mass .... 


. 57,730 


Homestead, Pa.... 


. 20,452 


Honolulu 


. 83,327 


Hopkinsville, Ky . . 


. 9,696 


Hoquiam, Wash... 


..10,058 


Hornell,N.Y 


. 15,625 


Hot Springs, Ark . . 


. 11,697 


Houston, Texas 


.138,276 


Hudson, N. Y 


. 11,417 


Huntington, Ind.. . 


. 14,000 


Huntington, W. Va 


. 50,177 


Hutchinson, Kans 


. 23,298 


Hyde Park, Mass. . 


. 15,507 


Independence, Kas 


. 11,902 


Independence, Mo. 


. 11,686 


Indianapolis, Ind . . 


.314,194 


Iowa Citv, la 


. 11,267 


Ironton, 


. 14,007 


Ironwood, Mich . . 


. 15,739 


Irvington, N. J. . . 


. 25,480 


Ishpeming, Mich . 


. 10,500 


Ithaca, N.Y 


. 17,004 


Jackson, Mich 


. 48,314 



Jackson, Miss 22,817 



Jackson, Tenn 18 , 820 

Jacksonville, Fla. . . . 91 ,543 

Jacksonville, 111 15 , 326 

Jamestown, N. Y. . . 38,898 

Janesville, Wis 18,894 

Jeanette, Pa 10,627 

Jefferson City, Mo. . 14,490 
Jeffersonville, Ind . . . 10 , 098 
Jersey City, N.J... 297, 864 
Johnstown, N.Y. . . 10,447 

Johnstown, Pa 67,327 

Joliet, 111 34,670 

Joplin, Mo 29,885 

Kalamazoo, Mich ... 48 , 487 

Kankakee, 111 16,758 

Kansas City, Kans . 97,218 
Kansas City, Mo. . .324,410 

Kearney, N.J 18,659 

Keene, N. H 11,210 

Kenosha, Wis 40,472 

Kenmore 12,683 

Keokuk, la 14,423 

Key West, Fla 18,749 

Kingston, N.Y 25,908 

Knoxville, Tenn. . . . 77,818 

Kokomo, Ind 30,067 

Laconia, N. H 10,183 

Lackawanna, N. Y . 17,918 

LaCrosse, Wis 30,417 

Lafayette, Ind 22,488 

La Grange, Ga 17,038 

Lake Charles, La. . . 13,088 

Lakewood, 41,732 

Lancaster, 13,093 

Lancaster, Pa 56 , 150 

Lansing, Mich 57,327 

LaPorte, Ind 15,158 

Laredo, Tex 22,710 

LaSalle, 111 13,050 

Lawrence, Kans. .. . 12,456 
Lawrence, Mass. .. . 94,270 
Leavenworth, Kas. . 16,912 

Lebanon, Pa 19,240 

Leominster, Mass. . . 19 , 745 

Lewiston, Me 31,791 

Lexington, Ky 47,204 

Lima, 41,508 

Lincoln, 111 11,882 

Lincoln, Neb 54,934 

LittleFalls, N. Y... 13,029 
Little Rock, Ark.... 64,997 

Lockport, N. Y 21,308 

Logansport, Ind 21 , 626 



189 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS— 1920— CITIES OF 
10,000 AND OVER— Continued 



Long Beach, Cal.... 55,593 
Long Branch, N.J. . 13,298 

Lorain, 37,883 

Los Angeles, Cal.... 575', 480 

Louisville, Ky 234,891 

Lowell, Mass 112,479 

Lynchburg, Va 29,494 

Lynn, Mass 99,336 

May wood. Ill 12,072 

McAlester, Okla.... 12,095 
McKeesport, Pa. . . . 42, 
McKees Rocks, Pa . 16,702 

Macon, Ga 52,525 

Madison, Wis 38,378 

MahonyCity, Pa... 15,936 

Maiden, Mass 44,404 

Manchester, Conn. . 18,370 
Manchester, N. H . . 78,384 
Manitowoc, Wis. .. . 17,563 

Manistee, Mich 12,385 

Maiikato, Minn. ... 12, 

Mansfield, 27,824 

Marietta, 12,992 

Marinette, Wis 14,610 

Marion, Ind 23,747 

Marion, 27,891 

Marlboro, Mass. .. . 15,017 
]\Iarquette, Mich. . . 12,718 
Marshall, Texas.... 14,271 
Marshalltown, la . . . 15 , 73 1 
Martinsburg, W. Va . 12.515 

Mason City, la 20,065 

Massillon, 17,876 

Mattoon, 111 13,552 

Meadville, Pa 14,780 

Medford, Mass 38,687 

Meh-ose, Mass 18,204 

Memphis, Tenn 162,351 

Menominee, Mich .. 10,507 
MeridenCitv,Conn. 34,739 

Meridian, Miss 23,285 

Methuen, Mass 13,189 

Miami, Fla 29,549 

Michigan Citv. Ind . 19 , 457 
Middletown, N. Y.. 18,420 

Middletown, 13,152 

Milford, Mass 13,055 

Millville, N. J 12,451 

Milwaukee, Wis. . . .457, 147 
Minneapolis, Minn .380,498 

Minot,N.D 10,476 

Mishawaka, Ind 15 , 195 



Missoula, Mont 12,638 

Moberly, Mo 12,808 

Mobile, Ala 60,777 

Moline,Ill 30,700 

Monessen, Pa 18, 171) 

Monroe, La 11,573 

Montclau-, N. J 28,820 

Montgomery, Ala. . . 43,464 
Moundsville, W. Va 10,669 
Morristown, N.J... 12 , 505 
Mt. Carmel, Pa.... 17,402 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y.. 42,726 

Muncie, Ind 36,524 

Muscatine, la 16,178 

Muskegon, Mich. ... 36,570 
Muskogee, Okla.... 36,750 

Nanticoke.Pa 22,614 

Nashua, N.H 28,379 

Nashville, Tenn.... 118, 342 

Natchez, Miss 12,608 

Naugatuck, Conn. . . 15,051 

Newport, Ky 29,908 

New Albany, Ind... 22,992 

Newark, N.J 414,316 

Newark, 25,404 

New Bedford, Mass. 121,217 
New Britain, Conn . 59,316 
NewBrunswick,N.J. 32,779 
Newburgh, N. Y.... 30,272 
Newburyport, Mass. 15,409 

Newcastle, Pa 44,938 

New Haven, Conn.. 162, 519 
New London, Conn . 25 , 688 
New Orleans, La.... 387, 408 
New Philadelphia, 10,718 

Newport, Ky 30,104 

Newport News, Va . 35 , 596 
Newport, R.I...... 30,255 

NewRochelle,N.Y. 36.231 

Newton, Mass 46,038 

NewYork, N. Y .5,620,048 
Niagara Falls, N.Y. 50,700 

Norfolk, Va 115,777 

Norristown, Pa 32,219 

N.Adams, Mass.... -22, 282 
N. Braddock, Pa.... 11,842 
Northbridge, Mass.. 10,074 
Northampton, Mass. 21,951 
N.Tonawanda,N. Y. 15,482 

Norwalk, Conn 27,700 

Norwich,Conn.(city) 22,304 
Norwich,Conn(t'wn) 29,865 



190 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS-1920-CITIES 
10,000 AND OVER— Continued 



01 



Norwood, 


24,966 


N. Yakima, Wash . 


^4,0S2 


Oakland, Cal 


216,361 


Oak Park, 111 


19,444 


Ogdensburg, N. Y . 


15,933 


Ogden, Utah 


32,580 


Oil City, Pa 


21,274 


Oklahoma City, Ok 


91,258 


Okmulgee, Okla... 


..17,430 


Old Forge, Pa 


12,237 


Clean, N.Y 


20,506 


Olyphant, Pa 


10,226 


Omaha, Neb 


191,601 


Orange, Conn 


16,614 


Orange, N.J 


33,268 


Oshkosh, Wis 


. 33,162 


Ossining, N. Y 


. 10,739 


Oswego, N. Y 


. 23,368 




. 23,003 


Owensboro, Ky 


. 17,424 


Paducah, Ky 


. 24,735 


Palestine, Tex..... 


. 10,482 


Paris, Tex 


. 11,269 


Parkersburg, W. Va 


. 20,339 


Parsons, Kan 


. 16,028 


Pasadena, Cal 


. 45,344 


Passaic, N.J 


. 63,824 


Paterson, N. J 


.135,866 


Pawtucket, R.I... 


. 64,248 


Peabody, Mass.... 


. 19,562 


Peekskill, N. Y. . . . 


. 15,245 


Pensacola, Fla. ... 


. 31,035 


Peoria, 111 


. 76,121 


Perth Amboy, N.J. 


. 41,121 


Peru.Ind 


. 12,561 


Petersburg, Va 


. 31,002 


Phoenix, Ariz 


. 29,053 


Phoenixville, Pa . . . 


. 10,484 


Philadelphia, Pa.. 1,823, 779 


Phillipsburg, N. J . 


. 16,923 


Pine Bluff, Ark. . . . 


. 19,280 


Piqua, 


. 15,388 


Pittsbarg, Kans... 


. 18,052 


Pittsburg. Pa 


.588,193 


(Including Allegl 


eny.) 


Pittsfield, Mass... 


. 41,534 


Pittston, Pa 


. 18,494 


Plainfield, N. J. . . 


. 27,700 


Plattsburg, N. Y . 


. 11,138 


Plymouth, Mass. . 


. 13,045 


Plymouth, Pa ... . 


. 16,996 


Pocatello, Idaho , . 


. 14,961 


Pomona. Cal 


. 13,505 



Pontiac, Mich 34,27! 

Port Chester, N. Y . 16,57; 
Port Huron, Mich.. 25,94' 

Portland, Me 69,271 

Portland, Ore 258,28: 

Portsmouth, N.H.. 13,53! 

Portsmouth, Va 54,38' 

Portsmouth, 33,48 

Pottstown, Pa 15,59' 

Pottsville, Pa 20,23 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 35,00i 
Providence, R. I. . . .237,59( 

Provo, Utah 10,301 

Pueblo, Colo 42,90; 

Quincy, 111 35,97 

Quincy, Mass 47,64 

Racine, Wis 58,59 

Raleigh, N.C 24,41 

Reading, Pa 107,78 

Redlands, Cal 10,44 

Reno, Nev 12,01 

Rensselaer, N. Y. . . 10,71 

Revere, Mass 28,82 

Richmond, Ind 36,00 

Richmond, Va 171,06 

Riverside, Cal 19,34 

Roanoke, Va 50,84 

Rochester, Minn... 13,72 
Rochester, N.Y.... 295, 85 

Rockford, 111 65,65 

Rock Island, 111.... 35,17 
Rocky Mount, N .C. 12,74 

Rome, Ga 13,25 

Rome, N. Y 26, 4^ 

Rutland, Vt 14, 9S 

Sacramento, Cal. .. . 65, 8S 

Saginaw, Mich 61, 9C 

St. Cloud, Minn.... 15, 81 

St. Joseph, Mo 77,95 

St. Louis, Mo 773,9c 

St. Paul, Minn 234, 5i 

Salem, Mass 43,6$ 

Salem, Ore 17,6' 

Salt Lake Citv,Utah. 118,1: 
San Angelo, Tex.... 10 3! 
San Antonio, Tex... 161. 3( 
San Bernardino, Cal. 18,7! 

San Diego, Cal 74 , 6! 

Sandusky, 22,8! 

Sanford, Me 10,6! 

San Francisco, Cal. .508,4 

San Jose. Cal 39, 6( 

Roosevelt, N. J 11,0- 



191 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS— 1920— CITIES 
10,000 AND OVER— Continued 



OF 



Santa Anna, Cal . . 


. 16,485 


Tonawanda, N. Y.. 


. 10,068 


Santa Barbara, Ca^ 


. 19,441 


Topeka, Kan 


. 50,022 


Santa Cruz, Cal. .. 


. 10,911 


Torrington, Conn. . 


. 22,022 


Sapulpa, Okla.... 


. 11,634 


Traverse City, Mich 


. 10,925 


Sagus, Mass 


. 10,874 


Trenton, N.J 


.119,289 


Saratoga Spg, N. Y 


. 12,694 


Trinidad, Colo.... 


. 10,906 


SaultSt.Marie.Mich 12,096 


Troy, N.Y 


. 76,813 


Savannah, Ga 


. 83,252 


Tucson, Ariz 


. 20,292 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


. 88,826 


Tulsa, Okla 


. 72,075 


Scranton, Pa 


.137,183 


Tuscaloosa, Ala... 


11,996 


Seattle Wash 


.315,652 
. 21,144 


Tyler, Tex 

Union, N.J 


. 12,085 


Sedalia, Mo 


. 21,023 


Selma, Ala 


. 15,589 


Uniontown, Pa 


. 15,344 


Shamokin Pa 


21,204 


Utica, N. Y 


. 94,156 


Sharon, Pa 


. 21,747 


Vallejo.Cal 


. 21,107 


Shawnee, Okla.... 


. 12,474 


Vancouver, Wash.. 


. 12,637 


Sheboygan, Wis . . . 


. 30,398 


Vicksburg, Miss . . . 


. 17,391 


Shenandoah, Pa. . . 


. 24,726 


Vincennes, Ind 


. 17,210 


Sherman, Tex 


. 15,031 


Virginia, Minn 


. 14,022 


Shreveport, La ... . 


. 43,015 


Waco, Tex 


. 38,500 


Sioux City, la 


. 71,227 


Wakefield, Mass... 


. 13,010 


Sioux Falls, S. D . . 


. 25,094 


Walla Walla, Wash. 


. 19,364 


Somerville, Mass . . 


. 93,091 


Wallingford, Conn . 


. 12,010 


South Bend, Ind... 


. 70,983 


Waltham, Mass.... 


. 30,891 


S.Bethlehem, Pa.. 


. 19,973 


Warren, 


27,050 


Southbridge, Mass. 


. 14,245 


Warren, Pa 


. 14,080 


S. Omaha, Neb. . . . 


. 26,259 


Warwick, R.I 


12,481 


So. Sharon, Pa 


. 10,190 


Washington, D. C. 


437,571 


Spartanburg, S. C . 


. 22,638 


Washington, Pa . . . 


18,778 


Spokane, Wash. . . . 


.104,402 


Waterbury, Conn.. 


91,410 


Springfield, 111 


. 59,678 


Waterloo, la 


36,693 


Springfield, Mass. . 


.129,523 


Watertown, Mass. . 


21,457 


Springfield, Mo.... 


. 39,201 


Watertown, N. Y. . 


31,285 


Springfield, 


. 60,840 


Waterville, Me. ... 


11,458 


Staunton, Va 


. 10,604 


Watervliet, N. Y. . 


16,073 


Stamford, Con. (city) 40,057 


Waukegan.Ill 


19,226 


Stamford,Con.(town) 35,086 


Waukesha, Wis.... 


12,558 


Steelton, Pa 


. 14,246 


Wausau, Wis 


16,560 


Steubenville, 0.... 


. 22,391 


Waycross, Ga 


18,068 


Stillwater, Minn... 


. 10,198 


Webb City, Mo.... 


11,817 


Stockton, Cal 


. 40,296 


Webster, Mass.... 


13,258 


Streator.Ill 


. 14,779 


Weehawken, N. J.. 


14,485 


Sunbury, Pa 


. 15,721 


West Allis, Wis.... 


13,765 


Superior, Wis 


. 39,624 


Westchester, Pa.. 


11,717 


Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 


171,717 


Westfield, Mass. . . 


16,044 


Tacoma, Wash .... 


96,965 


W. Hoboken, N.J. 


40,068 


Tampa, Fla 


51,252 


W. New York, N. J 


29,560 


Taimton, Mass 


37,137 


W.Orange, N.J... 


15,573 


Temple, Tex 


11,038 


W.Warwick, R.I... 


15,461 


Terre Haute, Ind . . 


65,083 


Weymouth, Mass. . 


15,057 


TifP.n,0 


14,375 


Wheeling, W.Va... 


56,208 


Toledo, 


243,164 


White Plains, N.Y. 


21,031 



192 



NEW UNITED STATES CENSUS-1920- CITIES ( 
10,000 AND OVER— Continued 



Wichita, Kaiis 72,128 

Wichata, Falls, Tex. 40,079 
Wilkes Barre, Pa .. . 73,833 
Wilkinsburg, Pa.... 18,924 
Williamsport, Pa. . . 31,860 
Willimantic, Conn. . 12.390 
Wilmington, Del... 120, 168 
Wilmington, N. C .. 25,748 
Winchester, Mass .. 10,391 
Windham, Conn.... 12,604 

(Includes Willimantic.) 
Winona, Minn 19, 143 



Winston- 
Salem, N.C.... 48,3 
Winthrop, Mass .... 15,4 

Woburn, Mass 16,5 

Woonsocket, R. I... 43,9 
Worcester, Mass. ... 179,7 
Wyandotte, Mich . . 13,5 

Yonkcns. N. Y 100,1 

York, Pa 47,4 

Youngstown, 132,3 

Zanesvillc, 28,0 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Name 


Affiliation 


Inaug. 


Age 


Yrs. in Offi 














Yr. 


Mo.Id 


Washington 


Federalist. . . 


1789 


57 


7 


10 




J. Adama .... 


Federalist. . . 


1797 


61 


4 






Jefferson 


Republican. . 


1801 


57 


8 






Madison 


Republican. 


1808 


57 


8 






Monroe 


Republican. . 


1817 


58 


8 






J. Q. Adams . . . 


Republican. . 


1825 


57 


4 






Jackson 


Democrat. . . 


1829 


61 


8- 






Van Buren 


Democrat. . . 


1837 


54 


4 






Harrison 


Whig 


1841 


68 




1 




Tyler 


Democrat. . . 
Democrat. . . 
Whig 


1841 
1845 
1849 


51 
49 
64 


3 
4 
1 


11 
"i 




Polk 




Taylor 




Fillmore 


Whig 


1850 


50 


2 


7 


1: 


Pierce 


Democrat. . . 
Democrat. . . 


1853 
1857 


48 
65 


4 
4 






Buchanan 




Lincoln 


Republican. . 


1861 


52 


4 


1 


; 


Johason 


Republican. . 


1865 


56 


3 


10 


: 


Grant 


Republican. . 


1869 


46 


8 










1877 


54 


4 






Garfield 


Republican. . 


18S1 


49 




fi 


3 


Arthur 


Republican. . 


1881 


50 


3 


5 


.1 


Cleveland 


Democrat. . . 


1885 


47 


4 






B. Harrison 


Republican. . 


1889 


55 


4 






Cleveland 


Democrat. . . 


1893 


56 


4- 






McKinley 


Republican. 


1897 


53 


4 


6 


1 


Roosevelt 


Republican. 


1901 


42 


7 


6 


; 


Taft 


Republican. . 


190P 


5^ 


4 






Wilson 


Democrat. . . 
Repubhcan. . 


1913 
1920 


56 

55 








Harding 









193 



POPULATION OF KENTUCKY COUNTIES 
1920—1910 

xxPopulation of Counties not reported by Census Bureau 
at time of going to press. 



Counties 



1920 



Gain 

or 

Loss 



1910 



17,289 


Inc. 


16,503 


16,761 


Inc. 


14,882 


9.982 


Dec. 


10,146 


12,045 


Dec. 


12,690 


25,356 


Inc. 


25,293 


11,996 


Dec. 


13,988 


33,988 


Inc. 


28,447 


9,572 


Inc. 


9,420 


18,418 


Inc. 


17,462 


29,281 


Inc. 


23,444 


14,953 


Inc. 


14,668 


10,210 


Dec. 


10,308 


20,614 


Inc. 


17,540 


19,652 


Dec. 


21,034 


9,328 


Dec. 


9.487 


15,197 


Dec. 


15,805 


13,975 


Dec. 


14,063 


20,802 


Inc. 


19,867 


61,868 


Inc. 


59.369 


8,231 


Dec. 


9,048 


8,346 


Inc. 


8,110 


22,474 


Inc. 


21.996 


17.213 


Inc. 


15,479 


35,883 


Dec. 


38,84.S 


17,434 


Dec 


17.978 


19,795 


inc. 


17,789 


8,589 


Inc. 


8,153 


13.125 


Dec. 


13.296 


10,648 


Inc. 


9.846 


40.763 


Dec. 


41.020 


10,894 


Inc. 


10.469 


8,887 


Dec. 


9,814 


15,569 


Inc. 


12,273 


54.664 


Inc. 


47,715 


15,614 


Dec. 


16,066 


27,427 


Inc. 


18,623 


19,537 


Doc. 


21,135 


15,197 


Inc. 


14,114 


4.664 


Dec. 


4,697 


12,. 503 


Inc. 


11,894 


10.435 


Dec. 


10,581 


32,483 


Dec. 


33,539 


19,927 


Dec. 


19,958 


11,391 


Dec. 


11,874 



194 



POPULATION OF KENTUCKY COUNTIES 
1920-1910— Continued. 



Counties 



1920 



Gain 

or 

Loss 



Greenup 

Hancock. . . 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison. . . 

Hart 

Henderson . . 

Henry 

Hickman . . . 

Hopkins 

Jackson .... 
Jefferson . . . 
Jessamine. . 
Johnson .... 
Kenton. . . . 

Knox 

Knott 

Larue 

Laurel 

Lawrence... 

Lee 

Leslie 

Letcher .... 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Livingston,. 

Logan 

Lyon 

Madison . . . . 
Magoffin . . . , 

Marion 

Marshall ... 

Martin 

Mason 

McCracken . . 
*McCreary. . 

McLean 

Meade 

Menifee 

Mercer 

Metcalfe. . . . 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Muhlenberg. 
Nelson 



062 
945 
287 
,546 
798 
,544 
,609 
,411 
244 
,048 
,687 
,369 
,205 
,482 
,453 
,172 
,655 
,004 
,814 
,643 
,918 
,097 
,467 
,829 
481 
732 
683 
795 
284 
859 
527 
215 
654 
760 
246 
767 
502 
442 
779 
795 
075 
214 
245 
518 
353 
137 



Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 



*Formed from Pulaski County. 

195 



POPULATION OF KENTUCKY COUNTIES 
1920-1910— Continued. 



Counties 



1920 



Gain 
or 



1910 



Nicholas 


9,894 
26,473 

7,689 
12,554 

7,820 
11,718 
26,043 
49,477 

6,745 
*34,010 

3,871 
15,406 

9,467 
11,854 
15,318 
18,552 
11,150 

7,785 
12,236 
15,694 
14,208 

6,011 
18,040 
30,858 
14,77? 
16,208 
20,762 
27,749 

8,783 
11,784 


Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
* 

Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 


10,601 


Ohio 


27,642 


Oldham 


7,248 


Owen 


14,248 


Owsley 


7,979 


Pendleton 


11,985 


Perry 


11,255 


Pike 


31,676 


Powell 


6,268 


tPulaski . . . 


*35,986 




4,121 


Rockcastle 


14,473 




9,438 


Russell 


10,861 


Scott 


16,956 


Shelby 


18,041 


Simpson 


11,460 




7,567 


Taylor 

Todd 


11,961 

16,488 


Trigg 


14,539 


Trimble 


6,512 


Union .... 


19,886 


Warren 


30,579 


Washington 


13,940 


Wayne 


17,518 


Webster 


20,974 


Whitley 


31,982 


Wolfe 


9,864 


Woodford 


12,571 







tMcCreary Co. (pop. 11,676) was formed from a part 
of Pulaski Co., after 1910 Census. 

*No comparison can be made; part taken from McCreary 
County since 1910. 



196 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES BY STATES, 1920 

AND 1910 CENSUS. REPORTED TO DATE, 

WITH PER CENT INCREASE 



STATE 



1920 



Per 
Cent 
Inc. 



The U. S. (incl. of 
Alaska, Hawaii and 
Porto Rico, Military 
and Naval) , 

Continental, U.S..., 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

♦Decrease. 



12,250,000 




105,683,108 


14.9 


2,347,295 


9.8 


333,273 


63.1 


1,750,996 


11.2 


3,426,536 


44.1 


939,376 


17.6 


1,380,585 


22.1 


223,003 




437,571 


32.2 


966,296 


28.4 


2,893,601 


10.9 


431,826 


32.6 


6,485,098 


15.0 


2,930,544 


8.5 


2,403,630 


8.0 


1,769,185 


4.6 


2,416,013 


8.5 


1,797,798 


8.5 


767,996 


3.5 


1,449,610 


11.9 


3,852,336 


14.4 


3,667,222 


30.5 


2,386,371 


15.0 


1,789,182 


Dec. 


3,403,547 


3.3 


547,593 


45,6 


1,295,502 


8.7 


*77,407 


*5.0 


443,083 


2.7 


3,155,374 


24.4 


360,247 


10.1 


10,384,144 


13.9 


2,556,486 


4.6 


645,730 


11.9 


5,759,368 


20.8 


2,027,564 


22.4 


783,265 


16.4 


8,720,150 


13.8 


604,397 


11.4 


1,683,662 


11.1 


635,839 


8.9 


2,337,459 


7.0 


4,661,027 


19.6 


449,446 


20.4 



197 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES BY STATES. 1910 

AND 1920 CENSUS REPORTED TO DATE, 

WITH PER CENT INCREASE 



STATE 


1920 


Per 
Cent 
Inc. 


1910 


Vermont 

Virginia . . . 


352,421 
2,306,351 
1,356,316 
1,463,610 
2,631,839 

194,402 


1 Dec. 
11.9 
18.8 
19.9 
12.8 
33.2 


355,956 
1,854,184 




1,141,990 


West Virginia 


1,221,119 
2,333,860 




145,965 


Alaska .... 


64,356 








191,909 








1,118,012 


Military and Naval... 






55,608 



Panama Republic x401,428, Increase 33. 
xDoes not include Indians. 

POPULATION OF JEFFERSON COUNTY BY 

DISTRICTS AND INCLUDING CITY 

OF LOUISVILLE. 

The population of 286,369 shows a gain of 8.9 per cent 
for Jefferson county. 

The census report of civil divisions of the county just 
made public shows that Magisterial District No. 3, which 
has a population of a little less than 20,000, which is almost 
100 per cent more than it was in 1910, Magisterial District 
No. 4, the most populous part, has a population of about 
11,500. 

In District 3, Highland Park is shown to have more than 
doubled its population in the past ten years, while Oakdale 
has increased 54 per cent. Highland Park is now the 
larger place of the two by about 800, while in 1900 it was 
less than Oakdale 

In Louisville, the Twelfth Ward shows a gain of over 
11,000, which is larger than the increase for the whole city 
within the corporate limits. While other wards show in- 
creases, others show marked decreases. 
* * * 

MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS. 

1920 1920 

Jefferson county 286,369 262,920 



District 1, including Anchorage 

town 9,752 

District 2, including Jeffersontown 

town 10,660 

District 3, including Highland Park 

and Oakland towns 19,592 

District 4 11,474 

Districts 5, 6, 7 and 8, co-extensive 

with Louisville city 234,891 



9,471 

8,448 



10,411 
10,662 



223,928 



198 



INCORPORATED PLACES. 

1920 1910 

Anchorage town 447 3i 

Highland Park town 3,979 1,9: 

Jeffersontown town 250 3^ 

Louisville city 234,891 223,9! 

Oakdaletown 3,198 2,0' 



POPULATION OF LOUISVILLE BY WARDS. 

1920 1910 

Louisville city 234,891 223,9: 

Wardl 16,372 18,3! 

Ward 2 17,529 18, 2< 

Ward 3 32,084 26,9: 

Ward 4 10,502 11,4' 

Ward 5 19,604 18,8! 

Ward 6 12,225 11,5' 

Ward 7 12,801 11, i: 

Ward 8 10,728 11.0! 

Ward 9 8,573 9,7' 

Ward 10 12,169 13,7' 

Ward 11 30,237 31,9 

Ward 12 52,087 40,7 

KENTUCKY SCHOOL CENSUS (COMPLETE) 1920 

All youths between the ages of 6 and 18, inclusive . . 642 , 2: 

Residing in small towns and country 502,5 

Residing in cities of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th 

classes 139,6 

White 582,0 

Colored 60,1 

White boys 296,0 

White girls 285,9 

Colored boys 29,9 

Colored girls 30,2 

The boys continue to lead in the school census in t 
country and the girls in the cties. 



199 



KErrruCKY school census by counties and 

INDEPENDENT CITIES, INCLUDING 
ALL THE FIRST FOUR CLASSES. 

[Taken August, 1920.) 

The scholastic census, taken this year in all the counties 
and every city shows a total scholastic population, practi- 
cally unchanged from last year (1919). 

Pike County leads in the number of school children 
outside the independent cities with 13,850. Only eighty- 
nine of these are negroes. Martin, McCreary and Morgan 
have no negro school children. 

The census by counties follow: 

Knox 

Larue 



Adair 5,038 

Allen 4,014 

Anderson 2,109 

Ballard 3,286 

Barren 7,082 

Bath 3,472 

Bell 7,102 

Boone 2,120 

Bourbon 2,962 

Boyd 3,323 

Boyle 2,428 

Bracken 2,479 

Breatnitt 6,261 

Breckinridge 5,630 

Bullit 2,604 

Butler 4,487 

Caldwell 2,885 

Calloway 5,707 

Campbell 2,624 

CarUsIe 2,448 

Carroll 1,428 

Carter 6,782 

Casey 5,478 

Clay 2,608 

Clark 6,675 

Clinton 2,670 

Christian 7,496 

Crittenden 3,082 

Cumberland 3,242 

Daviess 6,069 

Edmonson 3,515 

Elliott 2.980 

Estill 3,918 

Fayette 3,281 

Fleming 3,959 

Floyd 8,383 

Franklin 2,577 

Fulton 1,941 

Gallatin 1,117 

Garrard 3,634 

Grant 2,542 

Graves 7,809 



6,844 

2 723 

Laurel 6!387 

Lawrence 5,569 

Lee 3,532 

Leslie 3,444 

Letcher 6,784 

Lewis 4,349 

Lincoln 5,096 

Livingston 2,835 

Logan 5,597 

Lyon 2,546 

Madison 6,014 

Magoffin 4,456 

Marion 3,758 

Marshall 4,504 

Martin 2,520 

Mason 2,764 

McCracken 3,812 

McCreary 3,728 

McLean 3,537 

Mead 2,715 

Menifee 1 , 954 

Mercer 2,880 

Metcalfe 3,094 

Monroe 4 , 546 

Montgomery .2,026 

Morgan 5,097 

Muhlenberg 8,667 

Nelson 4,912 

Nicholas 2,386 

Ohio 7,479 

Oldham 1,757 

Owen 3,098 

Owsley 2,554 

Pendleton 2,755 

Perry 6,468 

Pike 13,850 

Powell 2,147 

Pulaski 9,477 

Robertson 834 

Rockcastle 5,239 



200 



KENTUCKY SCHOOL CENSUS— Contiuued. 



Grayson 5,946 

Green 3,113 

Greenup 6,570 

Hancock 2,015 

Hardin 5,525 

Harlan 7,415 

Harrison 3,116 

Hart 5,476 

Henderson 4,293 

Henry 3,214 

Hickman 2,709 

Hopkins 6,451 

Jackson 3,984 

Jefferson 8,909 

Jessamine 2,463 

Johnson 5,987 

Kenton 3,014 

Knott 4,509 



Rowan 3,24< 

Russell 3,571 

Scott 2,72( 

Shelby 3,20( 

Simpson 2,14( 

Spencer 2,06i 

Taylor 3,53: 

Todd 4,021 

Trigg 4,24i 

Trimble 1,58! 

Union 4,17' 

Warren 6,04: 

Washington 4 , 191 

Wayne 4,94! 

Webster 4,67J 

Whitley 7,66i 

Wolfe 2,95 

Woolford 2.59' 



The scholastic population in the independent citie 
including all of the first four classes, follows: 



Ashland 3,350 

Barbourville 643 

Bellevue 1,381 

Bowling Green 2,188 

Covington 10,550 

Corbin 1,241 

Carrollton 496 

Catlettsburg 917 

Central City 801 

Clifton 537 

Cynthiana 808 

Danville 1,289 

Dayton 1,637 

Earlington 1,002 

Elizabethtown 640 

Frankfort 1,538 

Ft. Thomas 1,022 

Franklin 657 

Fulton 837 

Georgetown 919 

Henderson 3,011 

Hopkinsville 2,657 

Harlan 1,364 

Harrodsburg 856 

Hazard 1,160 

Hickman 1,156 

Highland Park 1,452 

Irvine 561 

Jackson 669 

Louisville 46,376 



Lexington 8,611 

Lawrenceburg 48i 

Lebanon 79! 

Ludlow 851 

Maysville 1,261 

Mayfield 1,63. 

Madisonville 1,27 

Marion 52' 

Middlesboro 2,47 

Morganfield 69 

Mt. Sterling 1,03: 

Murray 71' 

Newport 4,44 

Nicholasville 60 

Owensboro 4 , 83: 

Olive Hill 51 

Paducah 5,72: 

Pikeville 59 

Pineville 80; 

Paris 1,28: 

Princeton 94' 

Providence 1 , 09i 

Richmond 1,32 

Russelhnlle 87 

Scotts\'ille 60 

ShelbyviUe 1,07 

Somerset 1,52 

Versailles 35 

Winchester 1,84 



201 



NEW RAILWAY PASSENGER RATES TO SOME 
PRINCIPAL CITIES. 

Under the ruling as annoxinced there will be a flat increase 
'of 20 per cent on all railroad fares. Pullman fares will be 
increased 50 per cent, and the additional amounts so derived 
will revert to the railroad companies. 

The table shows the present railroad and Pullman rates 
from Louisville to ten cities and the rates which will be 
charged after the increases become effective August 26, 
1920. The figures given in the Pullman fare columns 
represent the charges on lower berths. Charges on upper 
berths will continue to be 80 per cent of those for lowers. 





ri 
1 


7 

i 


r 
1 


i 

3 


New York 


$28.06 
9.72 


S6.48 
2.70 
2.70 
3.24 
3.24 
3.24 
5.94 
7.29 
3.24 

18.36 


$33.78 
11.66 
10.95 
17.57 
15.25 
14.79 
30.11 
40.93 
14.77 
90.47 


$9.72 


Chicago . ... 


4.05 


St. Louis 


9. 
14. 
12. 
12. 
25. 
34. 
11. 
73. 


13 

54 
71 
32 
09 
12 
85 
89 


4.05 


Atlanta 


4.86 


Birmingham 


4.86 




4.86 


New Orleans 


8.91 




11.94 


Detroit 


4.86 


San Francisco 


27.54 



20.2 



THE LOUISVILLE CYCLONE OF 1890. 

The afternoon papers of Thursday, March 27, 18! 
contained a notice of warning, from the Weather Bure 
Washington, D. C, of severe local storms and atmosphe 
trouble in Louis\-ille and vicinity. Shortly before the t 
nado there came a heavy rain followed by a hail stor 
accompanied by severe lightning and thunder shod 
The wind began to blow with a mournful sound, whi 
soon increased to a fearful shriek as it swept over t 
doomed portion of the city. The calamity occured abc 
8:30 p. m., and was over in a few minutes. 

Owing to the severe rain and hail storm, a great ma 
persons who would have been on the streets at that til 
had sought shelter and to this fact was due undoubtet 
the comparatively small loss of life in view of the tre 
mendous character of the disaster, as the streets w( 
filled with flying debris, falling walls, church steepl 
chimneys, telegraph poles, etc. 

The storm approached Louisville from a southwest© 
direction, down the Ohio River a few miles, southw( 
of the city, destroying farm houses, barns and stock, a 
greatly damaging the town of Parkland, a suburb of Lou 
ville. It struck Louisville at its south-western poi: 
traversing the entire length of the city, from southwi 
to northeast; crossed the Ohio River to Jeffersonvil 
doing some damage, then recrossed the river and ( 
slroyed the standpipe at the City Water Works, at 
point some three miles east of the last crossing. Fn 
that point it seemed to have spent its force, and pass 
over the State, doing but little injury. 

The width of the storm, evidenced by the damage throu 
the city, was from six hundred (600) to eight hundred (8C 
yards, or something over one-third of a mile, and in 
passage it partially, and in some cases totally, destroy 
five (5) Churches, one (1) Railroad Depot (Union), two \ 
Public Halls, three (3) School Houses, two hundred a 
sixty-six (266) Stores, thirty-two (32) Manufacturi 
Establishments, ten )10( Tobacco Warehouses, and fi 
hundred and thirty-two (532) Residences in the cii 
In addition to this, it destroyed and damaged in Parkla 
(now a part of Louisville) and vicinity, some thirty (J 
Residences and other property, and in the settleme 
known as Cane Run, occupied mainly by small farme 
some twenty-two (22) buildings. 

The pecuniary loss through the storm amounted to t 
million, one himdred and fifty thousand dollars ($2,150,00 
There were seventy-six (76) lives lost and over two hundr 
(200) injured, and some very severely. 

The next morning (Friday), after the storm, pursua 
to the call of William Cornwall, Jr., President of the Boa 
of Trade, a mass meeting of the citizens to consider t 
matter of relief, was held at the Board of Trade Rooi 
At the meeting a Committee, called the General Rel 
Conunittee, consisting of some sixty (60) persons, y 
appointed to take measures to assist and protect the siiffe 

203 



by the tornado, and William T. Rolph was elected Chair- 
man. From the Committee of sixty an Executive Com- 
mittee was formed, as fellows: Wm. T. Rolph, Chairrmaa 
Charles D. Jacobs, Mayer; William Cornwall, Jr.; Harry 
Weissinger; Andrew Cowan; Albert A. Stoll; Henry S. 
Tyler; Thomas H. Sherley; George Graulbert and Jacob 
Weller. Mr. Tracy Underhill was elected Secretary, 
and Mr. James F. Buckner, Jr., Superintendent of the 
Board of Trade, was elected Treasurer of the Fund. To 
this Executive Committee, practically, the work of relief 
was entrusted. The Mayor of the City, the Presidents 
of the Boards of Aldermen and Councilmen, were members 
of the Executive Committee. Through this Committee, 
known as the "Board of Trade Relief Committee," all 
relief was administered. A Committee of Finance,con- 
sisting of W. R. Belknap, Owen Gathright, Jr., E. H. 
Bowen, J. M. Harper and William A. Robinson, was 
appointed at the close of the day (Friday) and a head- 
quarters in the Board of Trade Building was established 
and a corps of clerks were employed, and everything made 
ready to meet and grapple with the emergencies. 

In a few days after the storm all the necessitous cases 
were practically relieved, in all 1,194 applications, number- 
ing 4,281 persons, were made for relief. 

There was received by the Committee a grand total of 
One Hundred and Fiftj'-six Thousand and Forty-five 
Dcllars and Seventy-six Cents (8156,045.76) of which 
Five Thousand Dollars (S5,000) was appropriated by the 
Legislature of Kentucky, Twentv Thousand Dollars 
($20,000) by the City of Louisville, Fifteen Thousand 
Five Hundred and Forty-seven Dollars and Five Cents 
($15,547.05) by voluntarj' subscriptions outside of the 
State, and the balance. One Hundred and Fifteen Thousand 
State, and the balance, One Hundred and Fifteen Thousand 
Four Hundred and Ninety-eight Dollars and Seventy-one 
Cents (5115,498.71) from the citizens of Louisville. 

The Committee paid all the neccesitous cases, all in- 
jured cases, settled a permanent fimd on those losing the 
wage-earning members of the family, paid all funeral 
expenses, which amounted to a total of Seventeen Thousand 
Two Hundred and Gone Dollars and Forty-five Cents 
$17,241.45). The Committee also adjusted the furniture 
losses of 453 families, and paid in full all the claims to the 
amount of Twenty-nine Thousand One Hundred and Sixty- 
four Dcllars and Sixty-five Cents (S29, 164.65). Also 
restored and rebuilt Three Hundred and Eleven (311) 
Homes at a cost of Seventv-one Thousand Four Hundred 
and Thirty-five Dollars and Fifty-nine Cents (§71,4; 5.59) 
The Committee also expended for the relief of those out- 
side of the City of Louisville, in the County, the sum of 
Sixteen Thousand and Seventy-six Dollars and Fifty 
Cents (?16,076.50). In addition it paid back to the City 
of Louisville her subscription of Twenty Thousand Dollars 
(.S20,000). After paying all losses in full, what little 
balance remained over was passed into General Relief 
Fund of the Board of Trade, for future emergencies. 

204 



WELFARE LEAGUE 26 CHARITIES IN ONE 

ONLY CONTRIBUTE ONCE. 

NEEDS FOR 1920-21. 

PURPOSE NEEDS 

GENERAL FUND 

Associated Chartites $41,243 

Catholic Orphan Society 2,880 

Children's Free Hospital 19,568 

Children's protective Association 7, 738 

Colored Orphans Home 4,249 

Consumers' League 974 

Dues $1 a year 

East End Day Nusery 1,229 

Eleanor Tarrant Little Foundation 3 ,500 

Fresh Air Home 4,485 

Home of the Innocents 9,000 

Jennie Casseday Rest Cottage 1 , 150 

Jewish Welfare Federation 31,607 

Kentucky Child Labor Association 100 

Kentucky Children's Home Society 10,000 

Kentucky Humane Society 2 , 240 

Dues $1 a year 

King's Daughters Home for Incurables 9,437 

Louisville Anti-Tuberculosis Association 21 , 790 

Louisville Wesley House 4 , 796 

Neighborhood House 21,012 

Parent-Teacher League ' 500 

Plymout Settlement House 3 , 547 

Pres. Colored Mission 15 , 542 

Public Health Nursing Association (Babies Milk 

Fund and District Nurse Association) 35,029 

Salvation Army Citadel 19,482 

Susan Speed Davis Home 29,019 

Union Gospel Mission 6 , 228 

Co-operative Activities. 

Central Purchasing Bureau 2,210 

Community Council 3 , 000 

Psychopathic Clinic 2 , 650 

School of Social Work 1,000 

Social Service Exchange 2,500 

Welfare League Central Office. 

Educational Department 7,841 

Financial Department 12,222 

Service Department 4 , 762 



Total 342,43 



203 



WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE. 

CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER IN WHICH 36 STATES 
HAVE RATIFIED. 

These States have Ratified the Suffrage 
Constitutional Amendment. 

1— Wisconsin June 10, 1919 

2— Michigan June 10, 1919 

3— Kansas June 16, 1919 

4— Ohio June 16, 1919 

5— New York June 17, 1919 

6— Illinois June 17, 1919 

7— Pennsylvania June 24, 1919 

8 — MassacTiusetts June 25, 1919 

9— Texas June 28, 1919 

10— Iowa July 2, 1919 

11— Missouri July 3, 1919 

12— Arkansas July 28, 1919 

13— Montana. July 30, 1919 

14— Nebraska Aug. 2, 1919 

15— Minnesota Sept. 8, 1919 

16— New Hampshire Sept. 10, 1919 

17— Utah Sept. 30, 1919 

18— California Nov. 1, 1919 

19— Maine Nov. 5, 1919 

20— North Dakota. . . . ." Dec. 1, 1919 

21— South Dakota Dec. 4, 1919 

22— Colorado Dec. 12, 1919 

23— Rhode Island Jan. 6, 1919 

24— Kentucky Jan. 6, 1920 

25— Oregon Jan. 13, 1920 

26— Indiana Jan. 16, 1920 

27— Wyoming Jan. 27, 1920 

28— Nevada Feb. 7, 1920 

29— New Jersey Feb. 10, 1920 

30— Idaho Feb. 11, 1920 

31— Arizona Feb. 12, 1920 

32— New Mexico Feb. 28, 1920 

33— Oklahoma Feb. 28, 1920 

34— West Virginia March 10, 1920 

35— Washington March 22, 1920 

36— Tennessee Aug. 18, 1920 



203 



WOMEN OF VOTING 
26,883.566 
(Estimate of citizens 21 and over 1920 Census.) 



Women 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado ....... 

Connecticut . . . . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . 

New Jersey 

New Mexico . . . . 

New York 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota . . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . . 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina . . 
South Dakota . . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington . . . . 
West Virginia . . . 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



552,154 

48,280 
387,193 
738,524 
234,767 
368,644 

64,286 
196,553 
674,463 

76,799 
1,724,240 
847,723 
664,008 
482,827 
637,731 
434,889 
248,309 
405,200 
1,181,933 
864,636 
563,652 
454,235 
985,167 

89,915 
327,844 

19,954 
148,090 
810,324 

80,467 

3,033,273 

571,422 

134,646 

1,538,175 

391,813 

185,155 

2,325,408 

183,030 

378,353 

147,605 

596,648 

972,639 

94,301 
117,571 
570,320 
305,449 
313,465 
672,272 

31,724 



Total 26,883.560 



(No allowance is made in this table for aliens.) 
9(Y7 



Sinking of the Lusitania 

Story of the sinking of the Lusitania as tcld by Wesley 
Frost, a Kentuckian, son of Dr. William Gocdel Frcst, 
President of Berea Ky. College. 

Wesley Frost was born in Oberlin, Ohio, June 17, 
1884. When a small boy moved to Berea, Kentucky. 
He entered the Consular service in 1912 and on April 24, 
1914, was assigned as American Consul at Cork (Queens- 
town) where he remained throughout the most trying period 
of the submarine warfare. His story of the sinking of the 
Lusitania follows: 

On the afternoon of May 7, 1915 I was engaged in 
work on a long annual consul report. At 2:30 in the 
afternoon, my Vice Consul, Mr. Lewis C. Thomson of 
Norfolk, Va., came hurriedly up the stairs — the American 
Consulate at Queenstown is on a second floor above a 
barroom — saying that there was a wildfire rumor about 
town that the Lusitania had been attaked. Stepping 
quickly to the windows, we could see a very unusual stir 
in the harbor, and as we looked, the harbor's mosquito 
fleet of tugs, tenders and trawlers, some two dozen in all, 
started toward the harbor mouth. 

"I immediately went to the telephone and called up 
Paymaster Norcocks, the secretary to Rear Admiral Sir 
Charles Coke. 'I hear,' said I, ratehr apologetically, 
'there is some sort of a street rumor the Lusitania has 
been attacked'. I could hardly believe my ears when the 
response came. 'It's true, Mr. Frost; we are afraid she is 
gone.' The stress on that word 'true' gave me an unfor- 
gettable mental shock; and I listened rather mechanically 
to The meager information the paymaster could give me — 
the wireless message of distress, 'Come at once. Big list 
to starboard. Ten miles off Kinsale,' and the telephone 
confirmation by watchers on the shore at the Old Head 
of Kinsale that the Lusitania had disappeared. 

"My first act was to telegraph briefly to Consul General 
Skinner and Ambassador Page at London, giving the 
astounding facts. Then I started out to procure a supply 
of British specie for lonas." 

The Kentuckian paused. "Will you give a brief account 
of the fatal attack itself?" he was asked. 

"The Lusitania, as you may know, was over an eighth 
of a mile long, was worth $12,000,000 and carried 2,000 
persons," he continued. "The destruction by earthquake 
of any of the large hotels here or in any great city would 
not result in greater loss of life and property than when 
the Lusitania was destroyed. 

"The 7th of May, 1915, found South Ireland smiling in 
the sunshine with the sea like a mirror. A goodly company 
of America's great men and finest women were looking 
with pleasure from the deck of the vessel at the enchanting 
emeral green of Old Kinsale. Suddenly, at eight minutes 

208 



past 2 o'clock, a ewift torpedo came leaping thrcugh th 
surface from lardward, and with its exploding detonatio: 
that splendid scene was converted into an appallingcata: 
trophe. 

"Confident of her floating capacity, the ship's officer 
forbade the manning of lifeboats; and when the hugi 
vessel foundered, eighteed minutes later, 1,200 person 
were thrust headlong into eternity. Eight hundred mei 
300 women and 100 children perished by the abysma 
crime, and thirty-three of the children were infants in arms 
Out of 190 Americans only sixty-six lived to tread thi 
earth again; and our death roll included Elbert Hubbard 
Charles Miller, Dr. J. S. Person and others of the higheg 
type Americans. 

"To the credit of our race, be it said, there was neve 
a trace of panic in that awful event. But there was con 
fusion of the most heart-rending kind — husbands behcldini 
their wives crushed and flung hurtling like debris, white 
haired ladies dying in pathetic, silent self-control, am 
children drowning in speechless terror while locking int 
the eyes of their powerless mothers. A survivor told m^ 
of standing high on the vessel's stem, as the bow wa 
disappearing, and gazing down sixty feet or more upoi 
the impotent human beings swirling madly like flies beneatl 
the surface and upon it. And at the instant when th 
ocean closed at last upon the ship, a curious, minor-keyo 
sound of terror sprang along the waters, as if the sea itsel; 
he said, were moaning in agony. 

'Elbert Hubbard clung to a cylindrical steel drum broke 
out of a life raft, and as often as he was able to climb o; 
to it it rolled and toppled him off on the far side, until th 
veteran philosopher presently gave way to shock am 
exposure. The icy fingers of that sea, indeed, were able t 
search with paralyzing sureness into the heart's chamber 
of even the strongest men. One lifeboat, rowing about 
observed a mysterious flash on a distant wave and found 
life buoy clasped by a drowned woman's hand, and on th 
hand a superb diamond. 

"I saw the ghastly procession of rescue vessels as the 
landed the living and the dead that night under the flarin 
gas torches along the Queenstown waterfront. Boat aft( 
boat came up out of the darkenss, discharging bruised an 
shuddering women, maimed and half-naked men, and 
few wide-eyed little children whose innocent minds wer 
wrestling with this strange new manifastaticn of lif 
Frenzied women begged me for their husbands; and mens 
with pitiable, choking efforts of matter-of-factness, wer 
ceaselessly from group to group, looking for their littl 
daughters, theri brothers and in some cases for their Amer 
can brides. Piles of corpses like cordwood, grew highe 
and higher among the coils of rope and ships' stores on th 
dark old quays. Every voice in that great mixed thron 
spoke in instinctive imdertones, varried only here an 

209 



spoke in instinctive undertones, varried only here and 
there by a painful coughing fit or a smothered burst of 
sobbing. 

"But I shall not continue my account of this terrible 
tragedy. Sufficient to say that during the next fortnight. 
Queenstown lived in a nightmare. Grown men and women 
staggered in and out of my office literally insane from 
grief; and every hour brought to light some ffesh phase 
of tragedy and woe until mind and heart refused longer 
to register the redundant awfulness. I have only men- 
tioned so much of this satan's carnival to you, in order 
that you may draw your onw conclusion of German sub- 
marine warfare. All war is horrible, and certain horror 
will always be inherent in submatine warfare, just as it is 
in artillery work. But the Germans undertook their 
submarine campaign in a gratuitously horrible manner ond 
spirit, wilfully rejecting measures that could mitigate and 
wilfully adding those that accentuated its frightfulness." 



210 



MEXICO. 

Population (approximate estimate, 1907), 15,605,919, 

Area, 767,005 square miles. 

President 

Government. Under direction of the President and 
Council, by eight Secretaries of State; also a house of 
Representatives and a Senate. States. Twenty-seven 
in number and three Territories; also a Federal District. 

See map of Mexico. 

Population 

Atlantic States— Square Miles Est. 1907 

Tamaulipas 32,128 278,948 

Vera Cruz 29,201 1,081,030 

Tabasco 10,072 169,834 

Campeche 19,087 86,942 

Yucatan 35,203 384,087 

Inland States- 
Chihuahua 87,802 387,784 

Cohaulla 63,569 306,938 

NuevoLeon 23,592 387,937 

Duranuo 38,009 380.294 

Zacatecas 24,757 472,190 

San Luis Potosi 25,316 585,432 

Aguascalientes 2,950 102,418 

Guanajuato 11,370 1,161,724 

Queretaro 3,556 232,389 

Hidalgo 8,917 625,051 

Mexico 9,247 944,463 

Federal District 463 561 ,516 

Morelos 2,773 165,115 

Tlaxcala 1,595 175,315 

Puebla 12,204 1,031,133 

Pacific States- 
Lower California (Terr) 58,328 48,624 

Sonora 76,900 226,682 

Sinaloa 33,671 297,701 

Tepic(Terr) 11,275 151,098 

Jalisco 31,846 1,154.891 

Colima 2,272 65,815 

Michoacan 22,874 936,033 

Guerrero 24,996 480,205 

Oaxaca 35,382 949,633 

Chiapas 27,222 361,799 

PRINCIPAL CITIES OF MEXICO. 

MEXlCO(Capital) 364.721 Morelia 39,278 

Puebla 95.521 Oaxaca 36,049 

Guadalaiara 108,208 Orizaba 33.894 

San Luis Potosi .. . 62,619 Aguascalientes 38,142 

Leon 64,763 Saltillo 24,096 

Monterey 62,866 Duraneo 42,993 

Pachuca 38,187 Chihuahua 31,905 

Zacatecas 33,656 Vera Cruz 30,164 

Guanajuato 42,686 Toluca 26,304 

Merida 43,930 Celaya 26,065 

Queretaro 38,852 

211 



PANAMA. 

President— Dr. Manuel Amador Guerrero. Area— 48( 
miles long, 37 to 110 miles wide; 31,570 square miles 
Population- (Estimate) 1907, 400,000. Government- 
Seceded from Columbia and independence declared Nov. 4 
1903. Panama (capital)— 40,000 population. 



THE GREAT PANAIVIA CANAL RECORD. 

Canal Excavation to Oct. 1, 1915, in cubic yards: 

By French companies 78,146,96( 

French excavation useful to canal 29,908,00( 

By Americans — 

Dry excavation 149,321,873 

Dredges 83,232,130 

Total — — 232,554,00; 

May 4 to Dec. 31, 1904 243,472 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1905 1,799,227 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1906 4,948,497 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1907. 15.765,290 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1908 37,116.735 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1909 35,096.166 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1910 31.437,671 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1912 30,269,349 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1911 31,603,899 

Jan. ItoOct. 1,1913.. 22,767,886 

Oct. 1, 1913, to Oct. 1, 1915, last report made public 
21,453,705. 

Canal Force— The total force at work on the Cana 
and railroad, Aug. 27, 1913. was 42,885. Canal employe 
nimibered 35,005, Panama raih-oad 4,957, and contractors 
employes 2,943. The number of "gold" or white Americai 
employes was 4,087. The great majority of laborers wer 
West Indian negroes. 

Total length, 50 J miles; length on land, 40? miles 
bottom width of channel, max., 1,000 ft. min. (in Culebri 
cut), 300 ft. depth, min., 41 ft.; max., 45 ft.; summi 
level, 85 ft. above mean tide. Locks in pairs, 12; locks 
usable lengtn, 1,000 ft.; usable width 110 ft. Gatui 
Lake, 164 miles square; channel depth, 45 to 85 ft. 5.000,00' 
cubic yards of concrete used. Time to pass through canal 
10 to 12 hours; through locks, three hours. Zone are; 
owned by United States, about 322 square miles. Frenc! 
buildings acquired, 2,150; French buildings used 1,537 
Estimated total cost of canal, $375,000,000. 



212 



• EVOLUTION 
of 
DESTRUCTIVE INSTRUMENTS 
GREAT WORLD'S WAR. 




>* I9I6 



1917. ■: 



213 



FISHER'S PERPETUAL 
CALENDAR 



Good for Any Month in An; 

Year from 1800 to 1999. Guar 

anteed Absolutely Accurate 



19th Century 


THE KEY 


20th Century 


EIGHTEEN 

HUNDRED 
\ND- 


III 






NINETEEN 

HUNDRED 
AHD- 


-- ^5 53 8i 
.. 26 54 82 
-• 27 55 83 
. - 2S 56 84 


a 6 6 
1 55 
7 4 4 
6 3 2 


3 1 5 
27 4 
1 6 3 
6 4 1 


374 

263 
1 5 2 
6 3 7 


2 6 4 
1 53 
7 4 2 
5 2 7 


-- 21 49 77 
-. 22 50 78 
00 23 51 79 
.. 24 52 So 


01 29 57 »5 

02 30 58 86 

03 3» 59 87 

04 31 60 8X 


4 1 1 
3 7 7 
266 
1 5 4 


587 
4 26 
3 1 5 
I 6 3 


526 
4 1 5 
374 
1 5 2 


4 1 6 
37 5 
264 

7 4 2 


- 25 53 Si 

- 26 54 82 
-- 27 55 83 
.. 28 56 S4 


05 M 6« 99 
ol34 6«9t> 

07 IS 63 91 

oS 36 64 92 


6 33 
6 2 2 
4 1 1 
376 


7 5 2 
6 4 1 
537 
3 1 5 


7 4 1 
6 3 7 
5 26 
3 7 4 


6 3 1 
5 2 7 
4 1 6 
2 6 4 


01 29 57 85 

02 30 58 86 

03 31 59 87 

04 32 60 88 


09 37 65 93 

10 38 66 94 

11 39 67 95 

12 40 68 96 


1 5 5 
74 4 
6 3 3 
52 1 


2 7 4 
1 6 3 
7 5 2 
5 37 


263 
1 5 2 
7 4 1 
526 


1 63 
7 4 2 
63 1 
4 1 6 


05 33 61 89 

06 34 62 90 

07 35 63 91 

08 36 64 92 


13 41 69 97 
r4 42 70 98 

15 43 71 99 

16 44 72 -- 


377 
26 6 
1 5 5 
7 4 8 


4 2 6 
3 1 5 
2 7 4 
7 52 


4 1 5 
3 7 4 
2 6 3 
7 4 1 


3 7 5 
264 
1 53 
6 3 1 


09 37 65 93 

10 38 66 94 

11 39 67 95 

12 40 68 96 


17 45 73 -- 

18 46 74 •• 

19 47 75 -- 

20 48 76 . . 


S 28 
4 1 1 
877 
866 


6 4 1 
5 37 
426 
2 7 4 


6 37 
5 2 6 
4 1 5 
2 6 3 


587 
4 1 6 
376 
1 63 


13 41 69 97 

14 42 70 98 

15 43 71 99 

16 44 72 -. 


21 49 77 -- 

22 50 78 -- 

23 51 79 00 

24 52 80 .. 


744 
6 8 8 
6 2 2 
4 1 7 


1 63 
7 6 2 
64 1 
4 26 


1 52 
7 4 1 
6 37 
4 1 5 


7 4 2 
6 3 1 
6 2 7 
37 6 


17 45 73 -- 

18 46 74 .. 

19 47 75 .- 

20 48 76 -. 


AJso 2200 and-; 
i 26008tid-; 


CopyriBht 1907 by J. I. Fisher. 

JOHNI. FISHER PUB. CO 
Lonisville. Ky. 


Also 1500 and-; 
2300 and-; 
Etc.. Etc. 



214 



MONTHLY 



8 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


■l 


7 


3 


4 


S 


g 


7 


1 


» 


10 


It 


12 


t; 


14 


IS 


IS 


17 


11 


It 


21 


21 


22 


23 


24 


2S 


21 


21 


21 


21 


30 


31 






... 


^ 



SiMITW 


T 


pis 


"' 


■ 1 ■ 






11 2 


3 


4 


6 


1 


7 


II 


in 


It 


17 


13 


14 


15 11 


IT 


111 


11 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 


2S 


26 


27 


2S 


29,30 


31 




...I...I... 


.. 1 .. 



CAI^ENDARS 

2 



A|M 


T 


W 


T 


FI8 
r 


■2 


-3 


4 


5 


i 


-7 i 


t 


in 


11 


12 


13 


14 IS 


I* 


17 


m 


It 


20 


21 12 


71 


74 


2S 


21 


27 


2S :i 


30 31 


..1 . 













4 






8" MIT 


V T 


F 


S 




— 


f 


I 


1 

10 


•4 


5 


1 


7 1 


It 


17 


13 


14 IS 


19 




11 


19 


70 


21 22123 


24 


25 


29 27 


2tl2t 


30 


3]\ 







5 






6 








"i 

II 


■e 

13 

!? 


T W TIF 
. 1 21 3 
7 1 910 
14 15 19117 
21122 23 24 
28l29130l31 


"si 

-4 
It 
It 
2$ 


t 


8 
13 


MX 

ij ,S 

21 22 
21 21 


I 

9 

19 
23 
SO 


10 
17 
24 
It 


F 
-4 
11 
IS 
25 


8 
1 

li 
29 



7 






S M T W T 


F 


S 








12 3 4 


5 


6 


7 8 9 to It 


12 


13 


14 IS 16 17 19 


It 


20 


21 22 23; 24 25 


26 


27 


2912913031 ... 


.. 





DAYS IN MONTH 
30 — April, June, September, November. 
31 — Jan., March, May, July, August, Oct., Dec. 
28— February. Leap Year 29. 

THE USE OF THE CALENDAR 

THE KEY— The figures under the 
Months refer to the Monthly Calendars 
numbered 1 to 7. 

EXAMPLES— For January, 1881, use 
monthly calendar No. 2; for December, 
1908, use No. 6, etc. It is assumed that 
the user knows the number of days ir 
each month. The Leap Years are imme- 
diately above the horizontal lines. 

PUBLISHED BY PERMISSION 



215 



SHIP BY TRUCK 
TRUCK ROUTE SCHEDULE 

ALL DIRECTIONS FROM LOUISVILLE 

AND OTHER POINTS 

Prepared by 

THE FIRESTONE SHIP BY TRUCK BUREAU 

305 E. BROADWAY— PHONES: MAIN 

2084, CITY 2084 

Route No. 1 — Distance 114 miles round trip. Louis- 
ville to Springfield, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek, 
Mt. Washington, High Grove, Cox Creek, Bardstown, 
Fredericksburg and Springfield. 

Route No 2— Distance 86 miles round trip. Louisville to 
Chaplin, Ky. Covers Jeffersontown, Fisherville, 
Wilsonville, Taylorsville, Bloomfield and Chaplin. 

Route No. 3 — Distance 98 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Willlisburg, Ky. Covers Jeffersontown, Fisherville, 
Wilsonville, Elk Creek, Taylorsville, Bloomfielde 
Mauds and Willisburg. 

Route No. 4— Distance 118 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Klondike, Ky. Covers Mt. Washington, High 
Grove, Fairfield, Bloomfield, Chaplin and Klondike. 

Route No. 5 — Distance 74 miles round trip. Louisvill, 
to Bloomfield, Ky. Covers Jeffersontown, Fisherville, 
Wilsonville, Taylorsville and Bloomfield. 

Route No. 6 — Distance 78 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Bardstown, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek, Mt. 
Washington, High Grove, Cox Creek and Bardstown. 

Route No. 7 — Distance 40 jailes round trip. Louisville 
to Mt. Washington, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek 
and Mt. AVashington. 

Route No. 8— Distance 20 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Jeffersontown, Ky. Covers Doups Corner and 
Jeffersontown. 

Route No. 9— Distance 92 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Deatsville, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek, 
Mt. Washington, Cox Creek, Samuels and Deatsville. 

Route No. 10— Distance 116 miles round trip. Louisville 
to New Haven, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek, 
Mt. Washington, Cox Creek, Bardstown, Belltown 
and New Haven. 

Route No. 11 — Springfield to Harrodsburg, Ky. Covers 
Springfi,eld, Mackville and Harrodsburg. 

Route No. 12 — Distance 40 mJles round trip. Louisville 
to Evans Landing, Ind. Covers New Albany, Rose- 
wood' Elizabeth and Evans Landing. 

Route No. 13 — Distance 70 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Mauckport, Ind. Covefs New Albany, Edwardii- 
ville. Lanesville, Corydon, Central and Mauckport. 

216 



Route No. 14— Distance 60 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Central, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edwardsvill( 

Lanesville, Corydon and Central. 
Route No. 15. — Distance 44 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to New Middletown, Ind. Covers New Albanj 

Edwardsville, Lanesville and New Middletown. 
Route No. 16— Distance 46 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to New Salisbury, Ind. Covers New Albany, George 

town, Byrneville and New Salisbury. 
Route No. 17— Distance 94 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Paoli, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floyd Knobi 

Galena, Greenville, Fredericksburg, Hardinsburj 

Rego, Chambersburg and Paoli. 
Route No. 18— Distance 66 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Hardinsburg, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floy 

Knobs, Galena, Greenville, Fredericksburg and Hare 

insburg. 
Route No. 19 — Distance 50 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Fredericksburg, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floy 

Knobs, Galena, Greenville and Frederickburg. 
Route No. 20— Distance 46 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Palmyra, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floyd Knobi 

Galena, Greenville and Palmyra. 
Route No. 21 — Distance 34 miles round trip. Louis\ill 

to Greenville, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floy 

Knobs, Galena and Greenville. 
Route No. 22 — Distance 30 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Galena, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floyd Knot 

and Galena. 
Route No. 23 — Distance 28 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Georgetown, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edward) 

ville and Georgetown. 
Route No. 24— Distance 26 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Pekin, Ind. Covers New Albany, Borden, Pekin. 
Route No. 25 — Distance 45 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Salem, Ind. Covers New Albany, Borden, Peki 

and Salem . 
Route No. 26— Distance 40 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Sheperdsville. Covers Camp Zachary Taylor an 

Shepherdsville. 
Route No. 27— Distance 94 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to New Castle, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middh 

town, Eastwood, Simpsonville, Shelbyville, Eminenc 

and New Vastle. 
Route No. 28 — Distance 96 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Pleasureville, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middh 

toen, Eastwood, Simpsonville, Shelbyville, Eminenc 

and Pleasiireville. 
Route No. 29 — Distance 60 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Shelbyville, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middli 

town, Eastwood, Simpsonville and Shelbyville. 

217 



Route No. 30 — Distance 102 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Frankfort, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middle- 
town, Eastwood, Simpsonville, Shelbyville, Clay 
Village, Greaffenburg, Bridgeport and Frankfort. 

Route No. 31 — Distance 10 miles round trip. Louisville 
to New Albany and Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Route No. 32 — Distance 70 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Coxs Creek, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek, 
Mt. Washington, High Grove and Coxs Creek. 

Route No. 33— Distance 12 miles round trip. Louisville 
to St. Matthews. 

Route No. 34— Distance 74 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Mt. Eden, Ky. Covers Doups Corner, Jefferson- 
town, Fisherville, Wilsonville, Taylorsville and Mt. 
Eden. 

Route No. 35 — Distance 80 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Bagdad, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middletown, 
Eastwood, Simpsonville, Shelbyville and Bagdad. 

Route No. 3fr— Distance 28 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Valley Station, Ky. Covers Louisville, Shively 
and Valley Station. 

Route No. 37— Distance 46 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Laconia, Ind. Covers New Albany, Elizabeth 
and Laconia. 

Route No. 38— Distance 52 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Corydon, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edwards- 
ville, Georgetown, Lanesville and Corydou. 

Route No. 39 — Distance 52 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Simpsonville, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Mid- 
dletown, Eastwood and Simpsonville. 

Route No. 40— Distance 82 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Graeffenburg, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Mid- 
dletown, Eastwood, Simpsonville, ShelbyvUle, Clay 
Village and Graeffenburg. 

Route No. 41— Distance 34 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Lanesville, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edwards- 
\nlle, Georgetown and Lanesville. 

Route No. 42— Distance 8 miles round trip. Louisville 
to New Albany, Ind. 

Route No. 43— Distance 8 miles round trip. Louisville to 
Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Route No. 44— Distance 48 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Elk Creek. Covers Doups Corner, Jeffersontown, 
Fisherville, Wilsonville and Elk Creek. 

Route No. 45— Distance 12 miles round trip. Buechel, 
Ky., to Mt. Washington, Ky. Covers Fern Creek 
and Mt. Washington. 

218 



Route No. 46— Distance 54 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Taylorsville, Ky. Covers Doups Corner, Jel 

fersontown, Fisherville, Wilsonville, Elk Creek an 

Taylorsville. 
Route No. 47 — Distance 72 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Southville, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middh 

town, Eastwood, Simpson\'ille, Shelbyville and Soutl 

ville. 
Route No. 48 — Distance 44 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Scottsburg, Ind. Covers New Albany, Jeffersoi 

ville, Sellersburg, Speed, Memphis, Henryville, Undei 

wood, Vienna and Scottsburg. 
Route No. 4&— Distance 30 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Marysville, Ind. Covers Jeffersonville, Watsoi 

Charlestown, Otisco and Marysville. 
Route No. 50 — Distance 34 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Lagrange, Ky. Covers Doups Corner, Jeffersoi 

town, Fisherville and Finchville. 
Route No. 51 — Distance 80 miles round trip. Louisvil] 

to Peytona, Ky. Covers St. Matthews, Middletowi 

Eastwood, Simpson\'ille, Shelbyville, Clay Villag 

and Peytona. 
Route No. 52 — Distance 48 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Pewee Valley, Ky. Covers Doups Corner, St. Mat 

thews, Anchorage, O'Bannon and Pewee Valley. 
Route No. 53 — Distance 58 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Lagrange, Ky. Covers Doups Corner, St. Ma 

thews. Anchorage, O'Bannon, Pewee Valley, Cres 

wood and Lagrange. 
Route No. 54 — Distance 26 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Fern Creek, Ky. Covers Buechel and Fern Creel 
Route No. 55 — Distance 36 miles round trip. Louisvill 

to Byrneville, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edwards 

ville, Georgetown and Byrneville. 
Route No. 56— Distance 90 miles round trip. Louisvil 

to Elizabethtown, Ky. Covers Shively, Valley St! 

tion, West Point, Stithtoh, Vine Grove and Eliz; 

be th town. 
Route No. 57 — Distance 40 miles round trip. Louisvil 

to Whitfield, Ky. Covers Buechel, Fern Creek an 

Whitfield. 
Route No. 58— Distance 40 miles round trip. Louisvil 

to Bradford, Ind. Covers New Albany, Floyd Knob 

Galena, Green\'ille and Bradford. 
Route No. 59— Distance 50 miles round trip. Louisvil 

to Livonia, Ind. Covers New Albany, Bennettsvill 

Borden, Pekin, Salem and Livonia. 
Route No. 60 — Distance 52 miles round trip. Louisvil 

to Ramsey, Ind. Covers New Albany, Edwardsvill 

Georgetown, Byrneville, New Salisbury and Ramsey. 

219 



Route No. 61— Distance 16 miles round trip. Jefferson- 
ville, Ind., to Utica, Ind. 

Route No. 62 — Distance 40 miles round trip. Louisville 
to Skylight, Ky. Covers Harrods Creek, Prospect, 
Goshen and Skylight. 

Route No. 63— Distance 60 miles round trip. Louisville 
to West Point, Ky. Covers St. Helens, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Orell, Kosmosdale and West Point. 

TRUCK TRANSPORTATION 
COMPANIES OPERATING OUT OF LOUIS- 
VILLE AND NEARBY TOWNS 

Route No. 1 — Cotton & Co., Bardstown, Ky., Anderson 
& Grider, Springfield, Ky. S. H. Weakley, Spring- 
field, Ky. 

Route No. 2— J. Cheatham, Chaplin, Ky. A. D. Suther- 
land, Chaphn, Ky. 

Route No. 3— Loyd Yates, Willisburg, Ky. Erastus Yates, 
Willisburg, Ky. W. 0. Colvin, Willisburg, Ky. 

Route No. 4— Jeff Hughes, Klondike, Ky. 

Route No. 5— C. P. Wells & Co., Bloomfield, Ky. W. S. 
Whitesides, Fairfield, Ky. J. Beck, Bloomfield, Ky, 
Z. J. Stone, Bloomfield, Ky. 

Route No. 6 — Smith & Smith, Bardstown, Ky. 

Route No. 7— W. H. McFarland, Mt. Washington, Ky. 
Porter & Wigginton, Mt. Washington, Ky. Barnes 
Bros., Mt. Washington, Ky. J. M. Collier, Mt. 
Washington, Ky. Jonas Gentry, Mt. Washington, 
Ky. J. J. Swearingen, Mt. Washington, Ky. Tom 
Tyler, Mt. Washington, Ky. 

Route No. 8— Frank Zender, Jeffersontown, Ky. J. R. 
Nutter, Jeffersontown, Ky. Jonas & Frederick, Jef- 
fersontown, Ky. G. Rapson, Jeffersontown, Ky. 
P. W. Boston, Jeffersontown, Ky. 

Route No. 9— G. R. Clemmons, Samuels, Ky. 

Route No. 10— Ben Shake, New Haven, Ky. M. Krebs. 
New Haven, Ky. Shake & Wells, New Haven, Ky. 

Route No. 11— Hayden & Campbell, Mackville, Ky. 
Walker Bros., Mackville, Ky. Mackville Produce 
Co., Mackville, Ky, 

Route No. 12— Q. T. Berry, Evans Landing, Ind. 

Route No. 13— Jesse Kirke, Mauckport, Ind. James K. 
Flora, Mauckport, Ind. Rowe Richard, Mauckport, 
Ind. 

Route No. 14— Wm. F. Blake, Central, Ind. 

Route No. 15 — Wm. A. Heckelman & Son, New Middle- 
town, Ind. H. J. Wintercorn, New Middletown, Ind. 

Route No. 16— P. C. Hendricks, New Salisbury, Ind. 

220 



Route No. 17— Louis A. Stoy, New .Albany, Ind. 

Route No. 18— John Hollowell, Hardinsbiirg, Ind. Ralph 

Trinkler, Hardinsburg, Ind. 
Route No. 19— Fred Allen & Bros., Fredericksburg, Ind. 
Route No. 20— Matin Huff & Co., Palmyra, Ind. L. A. 

Kahl, Palmyra, Ind. 
Route No. 21— John Reisert, Greenville, Ind. Geo. Jacobi, 

Greenville, Ind. Roy McPheeters, Greenville, Ind. 
Route No. 22— J. C. McCutcheon, Galena, Ind. 
Route No. 23 — Jesse McKinney, Georgetown, Ind. 
Route No. 24— Harvey C. Sullivan, Pekin, Ind. 
Route No. 25— E. E. Louden, Salem, Ind. 
Route No. 26— S. C. Bridewell & Sons, Shepherdsville, Ky. 

Robt, Ice, Shepherdsville, Ky. Fred Harshfield, 

Shepherdsville, Ky. 
Route No. 27— Geo. Button, New Castle, Ky, W. I. 

Jackson, New Castle, Ky. 
Route No. 28— Geo. Dutton, New Castle, Ky. W. I. 

Jackson, New Castle, Ky. 
Route No. 20— Wilson & Bright, Shelbyville, Ky. Webb 

Transfer Co., Shelbyville, Ky. Dudley Jesse, Shelby- 
ville, Ky. 
Route No. 30— Gibbs Transfer Line, Frankfort, Ky. Gra- 
ham Motor Transfer, Frankfort, Ky. 
Route No. 31— C. D. Denny & Son, New Albany, Ind. 

Hammersmith's New Albany Transfer, New Albany, 

Ind. 
Route No. 32— Stansbury-Smith, Cox Creek, Ky. 
Route No. 33— Claxton Bros., St. Matthews, Ky. 
Route No. 34— Cook Bros., Mt. Eden, Ky. 
Route No. 35— Foster & Terrell, Bagdad, Ky. 
Route No. 36— Reichmuth Bros., Valley Station, Ky. 
Route No. 37— W. W. Johns, Laconia, Ind. 
Route No. 38 — Wm. Schuppert, Corydon, Ind. 
Route No. 39— Mullins Bros., Simpsonville, Ky. Chas. 

B. Hanna, Simpsonville, Ky. 
Route No. 40— Blythe Bros., Graeffenburg, Ky. 
Route No. 41 — Gresham & Merkel, Lanesville, Ind. Lanes- 

ville Bus Line, Lanesville, Ind. 
Route No. 42— W. T. Collins, New Albany, Ind. 
Route No. 43— F. H. Same, Jeffersonville, Ind. 
Route No. 44— Everett C. Wigginton, Fisherville, Ky. 
Route No. 45— H. H. Hall, Mt. Washington, Ky. 
Route No. 46— Geo. King, Taylorsville, Ky. 
Route No. 47— Ratcliff Bros., Southville, Ky. 

221 



Route No. 48— C. E. Audrey, Scottsburg, Ind. Herbei 
Littell, Scottsburg, Ind. David McKnight, Scott£ 
burg, Ind. Henry Everett, Scottsburg, Ind. 

Route No. 49— D. 0. Hicks, Lexington, Ky. 

Route No. 50— W. G. Howerton, Finchville, Ky. 

Route No. 51— D. F. Hankins & Son, Peytona, Ky. 

Route No. 52— Wm. Brown, Pewee Valley, Ky. 

Route No. 53— W. A. Oglesby, Lagrange, Ky. 

Route No. 54— Ed Able, Fern Creek, Ky. 

Route No. 55—0. J. D. BjTne, BjTneville, Ind. 

Route No. 56— C. M. Temple, Elizabethtown, Ky. Jet 
kins-Essex Co., Elizabethtown, Ky. 

Route No. 57— Will S. Jones, \\Tiitfield, Ky. 

Route No. 58— Ed Baake, Bradford, Ind. 

Route No. 59— Dougherty Bros., Livonia, Ind. 

Route No. 60— W. R. Voyles, Ramsey, Ind. 

Route No. 61— Robt. Abrams, Utica, Ind. 

Route No. 62— Walter Leet, Skylight, Ky. 

Route No. 63— Emmet Crenshaw, West Point, Ky. 

ANYWHERE— ANYTIME-LOUISVILLE 

Wm. Noltemeyer, 820 South Hancock St. 

Central Truck Depot, 119 West Main St. 

Herman Poll, 1001 Mary St. 

P. G. Pulliam, 231 West Liberty St. 

Guy W. Smith & Sons, 420 South Fifth St. 

Louisville Taxicab and Transfer Co., Ninth an 
Liberty. 

Chas. W. Tyler, 1081 Bardstown Road. 

Rochelle I. Smith Co., 505 West Liberty St. 

J. B. Wathen, 2531 West Walnut St. 

Safety Transfer & Storage Co., 105 South Hancock S' 

Carl G. WiUiam, 2337 W. Chestnut, Shawnee 777-J. 

Central Truck Depot, 119 W. Main St., Main 2691 
City 1175. 

Ky. Motor Transport Co., 4068 S. 6th, Main 118] 
City 1191. 

SuUivan Transfer Co., 119 W. Main St. 

Hutchison Bros., 419 S. 6th St., Main 3536. 

Emil Norheimer, 1145 Bardstown Road, Highlan 
226; East 546. 

Settle Piano Transfer, 213 W. Chestnut, City 1716. 

M. P. Sutton, 1770 Ormsby, City 7216-L. 



222 



CITIES OF OVER 100,000 INHABITANTS 
Rank in 1910 and 1920 Census. 



CITY 



1910 


1920 


Rank 


Rank 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


9 


4 


6 


5 


4 


6 


5 


7 


7 


8 


8 


9 


17 


10 


11 


11 


10 


12 


12 


13 


16 


14 


14 


15 


13 


16 


15 


17 


18 


18 


20 


19 


21 


20 


22 


21 


19 


22 


25 


23 


24 


24 


28 


25 


27 


26 


30 


27 


23 


28 


29 


29 


26 


30 


32 


31 


81 


32 


31 


33 


41 


34 


33 


35 


36 


36 


34 


37 


39 


38 


35 


39 


37 


40 


54 


41 


58 


42 


43 


43 


49 


44 


68 


45 


51 


46 


38 


47 


44 


48 


40 


49 


67 


50 


60 


51 



New York 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Detroit 

Cleveland 

St. Louis 

Boston 

Baltimore 

Pittsburgh 

Los Angles 

San Francisco 

Buffalo ; 

Milwaukee 

Washington 

Newark 

Cincinnati 

New Orleans 

Minneapolis 

Kansas City, Mo.. . . 

Seattle 

Indianapolis 

Jersey City 

Rochester 

Louisville 

Portland, Ore 

Denver 

Toledo 

Providence 

Columbus 

St. Paul 

Oakland, Calif 

Akron, Ohio 

Atlanta 

Omaha 

Worcester, Mass. . . . 
Birmingham, Ala. . . . 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Richmond, Va 

New Haven, Conn. . . 

Memphis, Tenn 

San Antonio, Texas. . 

Dalls, Texas 

Dayton, Ohio 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Houston, Texas 

Hartford, Conn 

Scranton, Penn 

Grand Rapids, Mich . 

Paterson, N. J 

Youngstown. Ohio. . . 
Springfield, Mass. . . . 



223 



CITIES OF OVER 100,000 INHABITANTS— Cont'd. 



CITY 


1910 1920 
Rank Rank 


1920 
Population 


Des Moines Iowa 


62 
53 
42 
52 
45 
57 
56 
82 
50 
46 
61 
47 
55 
75 
48 
65 
66 


52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 


126 468 


New Bedford, Mass 


121,217 


Fall River Mass 


120,485 


Trenton, N.J 

Nashville, Tenn 


119,289 
118,342 


Salt Lake City, Utah 

Camden, N.J 

Norfolk Va 


118,110 
116,309 
115 777 


Albany 'N Y . . 


113 3.34 




112,759 


Wilmington Del 


110,168 




109,694 




107,784 


Fort Worth Texas 


106 482 


Spokane, Wash 


104,437 


Kansas City Kan 


101,177 


Yonkers.N.Y 


100,226 



REGISTRATION OF WOMEN IN LOUISVILLE, 1920. 



Wards Dem. 

First 1,383 

Second 1,435 



Third 
Fourth. 
Fifth. . . 
Sixth. . 
Seventh 
Eighth. 
Ninth. . 
Tenth.. 

Eleventh 2,269 

Twelfth 4,993 

Grand Totals. 
Highland Park. . . . 



3,317 

662 

1,815 

1,261 

1,750 

1,222 

477 

360 



-Women- 
Rep. 

1,413 
1,228 
3,529 
1,505 
2,225 
971 
1,028 
1,345 
1,568 
2,708 
3,668 
4,390 



Ind. 

381 

295 

816 

177 

238 

318 

265 

157 

73 

39 

341 

1,061 



21,139 
195 



25,887 
299 



4,161 



CITY REGISTRATION TOTALS BY WARDS 



Wards Dem. 

First 3,317 

Second 3,768 

Third 6,835 

Fourth 1,531 

Fifth 3,740 

Sixth 2,682 

Seventh 3,452 

Eighth 2,399 

Ninth 1,195 

Tenth 944 

Eleventh 5,349 

Twelfth 1 1,488 

Grand Totals 46,701 

Highland Park 584 

224 



Rep. 

3,263 
2,920 
7,159 
3,119 
4,809 
2,433 
2,162 
2,756 
3,349 
5,633 
7,772 



Ind. 

972 

820 

1,823 

462 

930 

732 

674 

379 

223 

150 

1,038 

2,569 



55,236 10,894 
648 59 



> 2 



iM 00 >« <M e<5 (m"(M C^"^*(>{lO Oo" 



jcot-icotocooii-ioioao 



I !>• O (M <N <M --I OO 



'OSCOC^CCOO'-HlOOSlC 



COt^TfKMCOcOOOOSt^- 



OSi— lOCOiOlCiOOiiOC^OOtD 



• O5(MlCC0t>"O5lO'— icq 



Ot^OOSCC'-Ht-t^C^lC^OOOO 
00'-ifO«i->*l?OCO»Ot^';0(N05 
^iM-* iMrtcq— r CO«D 



1 00 Tf( 05 coo m 



I lO -^ 00 CO Tfl 



« o.t; 






3 

o 

1^° 






225 



Sea 
O 



ij Q 
> Z 

= < 



ir-Ti^ Lo in oTio CO lo"-* co -^ •*! 

"-I ^ IM 

COOC»«OOOt^cOC^O-^t^ 



• iOCO-tH>.(— -^(MOOCOt^rfi 



> 00 lO CO t^ <M lO lO 



I CO CO C<1(M CO I 



'-<u0COt>.0000»CIr^COO5-^^ 

coo^^r^co-^toiot^cO'j'O 
CO c<i 00 ^ c<i CO cq '-I coo 



lOOOOiO'-HOOiOOOOOOOO 



1 rH ^ (M CO Ttl 



«500C^t:^C<l-<*lCO(MO5 



5COC<10CqTflC5COOCOO 

?(Mcococot^r^(MiOcooo 

050000'*IOJt^cOCOCq'-HOt^ 



Jlr^OiOOOiOOt^OSOOS 
■ICO-^CO-— iCOO>-<*<-HOiTtl 
■.J<-^t^(MTt<COCO'-l^^»OCO 



CO OCS> 05 < 
'^DfM lO -H < 
CSI 05 .— I .-1 C 



COIMt^CO-^IMIMC^K 



> t0 05 cocq o 



■ -^ iCCO |0 CO 



CO(MC5C0050500^-<tlt 



I IM CO CO IM 



t~00»C-HO<MC005iOTt<05CO 
O -- O CO CO ■<*< 00 lO O C2 -^ ■* 00 

evj CO t^ oo "O t^ CO -"^ CO '— I 05 CO -^ 



. CO -"^ CO ' 
I COCq CO (M ' 



I t^ O 00 CO 02 



05 O ■* coco 

O 0»0 CO -H (M Tjl t^ OOO _ _ 

t^-H05t^COOCOC5COTl<»0(M 

rt cf (M 






i3 • 






226 



TOTAL REGISTRATION BY CITIES OF KENTUCKY 
of the First, Second and Third Class 



CITY 


REGISTRATION, 1920 




D. 1 R. 1 Ind. 1 Tota 


First Class 

bLouisville 


46,442 

5,935 
5,115 
7,474 
4,152 

4,781 
2,665 
2,522 
2,535 
2,540 
1,341 
635 
582 


55,998 

3,799 
6,301 
5,889 
3,922 

4,234 

2,042 

2,667 

1,861 

1,522 

1,365 

1,447 

757 

1,200 

285 

1,257 

825 

839 

453 

296 

868 

1,434 

887 

372 

448 

317 

619 

505 

308 

330 


10,163 

""538 
552 
155 

209 

63 

71 
92 
105 
31 
68 


111 24 


Second Class 

aCovington 


9,73 


Newport 


12 03 




13,88 


Paducah . . 


8 22 


Third Class 

Owensboro 


9,22 


Henderson . . 


4,7C 


Hopkinsville 

Bowling Green 

Frankfort 


5,25 
4,47 
4,15 


Maysville 


2,81 


Middlesboro 

Corbin 


2,13 
1,40 


**** Ashland 






480 

1,183 

2,126 

884 

373 

644 

892 

1,517 

637 

836 

955 

237 

551 

649 

836 

786 

500 

1,709 

1,195 


4 

15 
18 

40 

45 

6 

10 
113 
45 
46 
18 


76 


Fulton 


1,44 


Mayfield 


2,96 




1,74 


*Marion . . . 


86 




96 


Providence 


1,80 


Madisonville 

Earlington 


3,0C 
1,52 


Morganfield 

Russellville 


1,20 
1,40 


Scottsville . . . 


61 


Central City 

Lebanon 


1,28 
1,19 


Elizabethtown 


1,18 
1,13 


Ludlow . . 




Bellevue 


1,221 
116 


309 


3,27 






'Clifton 






*Ft. Thomas 


399 

633 

395 

1,361 

2,097 

2.072 

568 


1,006 
482 
329 
958 
1,364 
1,638 
370 


324 
62 
16 
54 
29 
52 
44 


2,20 


Versailles 


1,17 




74 


Georgetown . . . 


2,37 


Paris 


3,49 


Winchester 


3,76 


Lawrenceburg 


98 



*Fir8t year's registration. 
aThirty-four out of sixty-two precincts. 
bFirst day, includes Highland Park. 
***Thirteen precincts missing. 
****Estimated majority. 



227 



TOTAL REGISTRATION— Continued. 



CITY 


REGISTRATION, 1920 




D. 


R. 


1 Ind. 


Total 


Harrodsburg 

Nicholasville 

Ricbmond 


952 

832 

**125 

1,315 


922 

720 


28 
14 


1,910 
1,560 


Danville 

Olive Hill 


1,328 
129 


93 


2,737 


Catlettsburg 








Jackson 


315 

1,330 

1,234 

401 

405 

273 

200 

694 

267 

1,023 

1,045 


266 
756 
794 
461 
703 
628 
474 

1,023 
681 
575 

1,013 

120,952 


10 

15 

16 
12 
19 
13 
22 
11 
26 
25 


591 


Cynthiana 

Mt. Sterling 

Pikeville 


2,086 
2,046 

878 


Hazard 


1,120 


Harlan 


920 


Barbourville 


687 
1,023 


Pineville 


959 


Franklin 


1,624 


Shelbyville 


2,083 






Totals 


120,658 


13,694 


251,163 







'Majority. 



228 



KENTUCKY PRESIDENTIALiVOTE. 



COUNTIES 



Adair 

Allen 

Anderson . . . 

Ballard 

Barren 

Bath 

Bell 

Boone 

Bourbon. . . 

Boyd 

Boyle 

Bracken 

Breathitt... 
Breckinridge 

Bullitt 

Butler 

Caldwell... 
Calloway . . . 
Campbell... 
Carlisle. . . . 

Carroll 

Carter 

Casey 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crittenden . . 
Cumberland . 

Daviess 

Edmonson . . . 

Elliott 

Estill 

Fayette 

Fleming 

Floyd 

Franklin . . . . 

Fulton 

Gallatin 

Garrard 

Grant 

Graves 

Grayson 

Green 

Greenup 

Hancock . . . . 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison. . . . 



3,526 
3,476 
1,819 
1,119 
3,972 
1,198 
6,563 

973 
4,017 
6,339 
3,205 
1,782 

220 
4,368 
1,393 
4,097 
2,946 
1,509 
12,210 

680 

906 
4,577 
3,543 
8,836 
3,077 
4,000 
2,350 
3,128 
2,335 
7,688 
2,348 

860 
2,544 
10,797 
2,989 
2,825 
2,735 
1,359 

536 
2,994 
1,613 
3,216 
4,174 
2,309 
2,798 
1.442 
3,344 
1,726 
2,372 



229 



KENTUCKY PRESIDENTIAL VOTE— Continued. 



COUNTIES 



Hart 


3,364 
4,139 


2,967 


Henderson 


7,275 


Henry 


2,202 


4,620 


Hickman 


863 


3,035 


Hopkins 


6,696 


7,797 


Jackson 


3,174 


260 


Jefferson 


75,213 


63,765 


Jessamine 


2,349 


3,204 


Johnson 


4,373 


1,174 


Kenton 


11,411 


16,300 


Knott 


2,295 


802 


Knox 


3,696 


1,269 


Larue 


1,838 


2,361 


Laurel 


2,478 




Lawrence 


2,830 


2,550 


Lee 


1,740 


1,185 


Leslie 






Letcher 


41,317 


1,860 


Lewis 


4,662 


1,570 


Lincoln 


3,710 


3,787 


Livingston 


1,887 


2,039 


Logan 


3,948 


1,442 


Lyon 


1,260 


1,957 


McCracken 


6,028 


8,461 


McCreary 


2,200 


600 


McLean 


2,404 


2,748 


Madison 


6,012 


5,647 


Magoffin 


2,347 


1,356 


Marion 


2,431 


3,007 


Marshall 


1,910 


3,527 


Martin 


1,720 


330 


Mason 


3,678 


4,730 


Meade 


1,468 


2,195 


Menifee 


573 


1,127 


Mercer 


2,786 


3,623 


Metcalfe 


1,809 


1,442 


Monroe 


3,418 


1,107 


Montgomery 


2,163 


3,068 


Morgan 


1,450 


2,578 


Muhlenberg 


6,667 


3,206 


Nelson 


2,945 


5,061 


Nicholas 


1,488 


2,939 


Ohio 


5,371 


4,011 


Oldham 


1,011 


2,635 


Owen 


1,036 


4,609 


Owsley 


1,914 


257 


Pendleton 


2,103 


2,589 


Perry 


4,345 


2,203 


Pike 


7,911 


5,619 



230 



KENTUCKY PRESIDENTIAL VOTE— Concluded. 



COUNTIES 



Harding 



Cox 



Powell 

Pulaski 

Robertson. . 
Rockcastle. . 

Rowan 

Russell 

Scott 

Shelby 

Simpson 

Spencer 

• Taylor 

Todd 

Trigg 

Trimble.... 

Union 

Warren 

Washington. 

WasTie 

Webster — 
Whitley .... 

Wolfe 

Woodford. . 



Totals 452,480 



2,204 



825 


1,025 


7,371 


3,743 


611 


933 


3,561 


1,436 


1,587 


1,257 


2,567 


1,126 


2,631 


5,047 


3,402 


5,446 


1,680 


4,824 


1,102 


2,135 


2,501 


2,380 


2,663 


3,292 


2,420 


3,055 


361 


2,057 


1,927 


4,905 


5,474 


7,010 


2,982 


2,600 


2,987 


1,820 


3,534 


4,812 


4,815 


1,356 



3,282 



454,497 



NOTE— The official vote of 22 out of the 120 Counti( 
in the State had not been announced up to the time thes 
pages went on the press. 

PRESIDENT. 

Taylor, Dem., First Elector 452,75 

Deboe, Rep., First Elector 446, 7C 

Democratic majority 6,02 



231 



KENTUCKY SENATORIAL VOTE. 



COUNTIES 


Ernst 


Beckham 


Adair 


3,499 


2,703 


Allen 


3,445 


2,244 


Anderson 


1,824 


.2,418 


Ballard 


2,300 


2,800 


Barren 


3,948 


5,482 


Bath 


1,975 


2,437 


Bell 


6,553 

982 


2,231 


Boone 


3,453 


Bourbon 


4,034 


5,501 


Boyd 


6.473 


4.881 


Boyle 


3,214 


3,214 


Bracken 


1,817 


2,571 


Breathitt 


2,415 


2,860 


Breckenridge 


4,333 


3,668 


Bullitt 


1,387 


2,543 


Butler 


4,084 


1,353 


Caldwell 


2,944 


2,733 


Calloway 


1.489 


4,005 


Campbell 


12,210 


9,914 


Carlisle 


680 


2,687 


Carroll 


886 


3,208 


Carter 


4,651 


2,841 


Casey 


3,519 


1,920 


Christian 


8,741 


7,220 


Clark 


3,089 


4,787 


Clay 


3,800 


869 


Clinton 


2,350 


414 


Crittenden 


3.115 


2,102 


Cumberland 


2,335 


928 


Daviess 


7,690 
2,348 


9,786 


Edmonson 


1,165 


Elliott 


837 


1,748 


Estill 


2,541 


1,810 


Fayette 


11,129 


12,797 


Fleming 


2,993 


3,515 


Floyd 


2,793 


3,577 


Franklin 


2,738 


5,210 


Fulton 


1,361 


3,759 


Gallatin 


532 


1,780 


Garrard 


2,982 


2,432 


Grant 


1,675 


2,668 


Graves 


3,158 


8,963 


Grayson' 


4,055 


2,803 


Green 


2,299 
3,097 


1,774 


Greenup 


2,724 


Hancock 


1,443 


1,601 


Hardin 


3,324 
7,433 


5,345 


Harian 


1,797 


Harrison 


2,300 


4,778 



232 



KENTUCKY SENATORIAL VOTE— Continued. 



COUNTIES 



Hurt 

Henderson . . . 

Henry 

Hickman . . . . 

Hopkins 

Jackson 

Jefferson .... 
Jessamine. . . 

Johnson 

Kenton 

Knott 

Knox 

Larue 

Laurel 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Leslie 

Letcher 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Livingston... 

Logan 

Lyon 

McCracken . . 
McCreary . . . 

McLean 

Madison. . . . 
Magoffin . . . . 

Marion 

Marshall . . . . 

Martin 

Mason 

Meade 

Menifee 

Mercer 

Metcalfe . . . , 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Muhlenberg . 

Nelson 

Nicholas ... 

Ohio 

Oldham.... 

Owen 

Owsley 

Pendleton . . 

Perry 

Pike 



3,218 
4,298 
2,192 
840. 
6,668 
3,143 

77,760 
2,338 
4,307 

14,515 
797 
5,194 
1,826 
4,249 
2,822 
1,717 
2,493 
4,240 
4,129 
3,715 
1,774 
3,934 
1,273 
6,059 
2,200 
2,399 
5,984 
2,300 
2,413 
1,905 
1,675 
3,754 
1,452 
575 
2,866 
1,802 
3,381 
2,156 
1,777 
5,585 
2,922 
1,488 
5,332 
1,010 
1,034 
1,899 
2,107 
4,180 
7,763 



233 



KENTUCKY SENATORIAL VOTE— Concluded. 



COUNTIES 



Ernst Beckham 



Powell 

Pulaski 

Robertson . . 
Rockcastle . .. 

Rowan 

Russell 

Scott 

Shelby 

Simpson 

Spencer 

Taylor 

Todd 

Trigg 

Trimble. . . . 

Union 

Warren .... 
Washington. 

Wayne 

Webster . . . 
Whitley. . . . 
Wolfe 



825 


1,025 


7,083 


3,599 


613 


935 


3,526 


1,419 


1,519 


1,256 


2,560 


1,134 


2,642 


5,036 


3,412 


5,411 


1,667 


3,198 


1,105 


2,131 


2,477 


2,366 


2,648 


3,278 


2,399 


3,042 


363 


2,056 


1,923 


4,888 


5,430 


7,261 


2,874 


2,592 


2,980 


1,808 


3,537 


4,810 


7,168 


1,550 


791 


1,321 


453,226 


449,244 



NOTE— The official vote of 22 of the 120 counties 
in the State had not been announced up to the time of 
going to press. 

OFFICIAL. 

Ernst 448,605 

Beckham 442,480 

Ernst majority 6 , 125 



234 



PRESIDENTIAL PLURALITIES AND ELECTORAL 

VOTES BY STATES FOR HARDING 

AND COX, 

For Harding (Rep.) 

Elec. Pluraitjc 
Vote 

.\rizona 3 

California 13 

Colorado (i 

Connecticut 7 

Delaware 3 

Idaho 4 

Illinois 29 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 10 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 18 

Michigan 15 

Minnesota 12 

Missouri 18 

Montana 4 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 14 

New Mexico 3 

New York 45 

North Dakota 5 

Ohio 24 

Oklahoma 10 

Oregon 5 

Pennsylvania 38 

Rhode Island 5 

South Dakota 5 

Tennessee 12 

Utah 4 

Vermont 4 

Washington 7 

West Virginia 8 

Wisconsin 13 

Wyoming 3 



Totals 404 

For Cox (Dem.) 

12 



Arkansas 9 

Florida 6 

Georgia 14 

Kentucky 13 

235 



Louisiana............. 10 37,000 

Mississippi...... 10 35,000 

North Carolina....' 12 75,000 

South Carolina 9 40,000 

Texas '. 20 45 ,000 

Virginia 12 40,000 

Totals 127 557,000 

PluraUty for Harding 6,099,500 

The official count which increases the above pluralites, 
was not available at the time these pages went on the press. 



U. S. SENATORS ELECTED 1920. 

Alabama— Oscar Underwood (Dem.), J. Thomas Hef- 
ILn (Dem.). 
Ariaona— Ralph H. Cameron (Rep.). 
California— Samuel Shortridge (Rep.). 
Colorado — -S. D. Nicholson (Rep.). 
Connecticut — Frank B. Brandegee (Rep.). 
Florida — Duncan W. Fletcher (Dem.). 
Georgia — Tom Watson (Dem.). 
Idaho— F. R. Gooding (Rep.). 
Illinois— W. B. McKinley (Rep.). 
Indiana — J. E. Watson (Rep.). 
Iowa — A. R. Cummins (Rep.). 
Kansas — Charles Curtis (Rep.). 
Kentucky— R. P. Ernst (Rep.). 
Louisiana — Edward Broussard (Dem.). 
Maryland— 0. E. Weller (Rep.). 
Missouri — S. R. Spencer (Rep.). 
Nevada — Tasker Oddie (Rep.). 
New Hampshire — George H. Moses (Rep.) 
New York— J. W. Wadsworth (Rep.). 
North Carolina — Lee Overman (Dem.). 
North Dakota— E. F. Ladd (Rep.). 
Ohio— Frank B. Willis (Rep.). 
Oklahoma— J. W. Harreld (Rep.). 
Oregon— Robert H. Stansfield (Rep.). 
South Carolina— E. D. Smith (Dem.). 
Utah— Reed Smoot (Rep.). 
Vermont— W. P. Dillingham (Rep.). 
Virginia — Carter Glass (Dem.). 
Washington — Wesley L. Jones (Rep.), 
Wisconsin— Irvine L. Lenroot (Rep.). 



23 Republicans. 
7 Democrats. 



236 



GOVERNORS OF STATES ELECTED 1920. 

A list of the newly elected Governors follows: 

Arizona T. E. Campbell* Rep. 

Arkansas Thos. C. McRae Dem. 

Colorado Oliver H. Shoup* Rep. 

Connecticut Everett J. Lake Rep. 

Delaware Andrew J. Lynch Dem. 

llorida Gary Hardee Dem. 

Georgia T. W. Hardwick Dem. 

Idaho David W. Davis* Rep. 

Illinois Len Small Rep. 

Indiana W. T. McCray Rep. 

Iowa N. E. Kendall Rep. 

Kansas Henry J. Allen Rep. 

Maine (Sept. 13) F. H. Parkhurst Rep. 

Massachusetts Channing H. Cox Rep. 

Michigan Alex J. Groesbeck Rep. 

Minnesota J. A. 0. Preus Rep. 

Missouri J. M. Atkins Dem. 

Montana Joseph M. Dixon Rep. 

Nebraska S. R. McKelvie* Rep. 

New Hampshire Albert 0. Brown Rep. 

New Mexico R. H. Hanna Dem . 

New York Nathan _L. Miller Rep. 

North Carolina C. Morrison Dem. 

North Dakota L. J. Frazier* Rep. 

Ohio Harry L. Davis Rep. 

Rhode Island E. J. San Souci Rep. 

South Carolina Robt. A. Cooper* Dem. 

South Dakota W. H. McMaster Rep. 

Tennessee Alf. A. Taylor Rep. 

Texas Pat M. Neff Dem. 

Utah Chas. B. Mabey Rep. 

Vermont James Hartness Rep. 

Washington Louis F. Hart* Rep. 

West Virginia E. F. Morgan Rep. 

Wisconsin John J. Blaine Rep. 

*Re-elected. 

25 Republicans — 10 Democrats. 

Holdovers 

Alabama Dem. 

California Rep. 

Kentucky Rep. 

Louisiana Dem. 

Maryland Dem. 

Mississippi Dem. 

Nevada Dem. 

New Jersey Rep. 

Oklahoma Dem. 

Oregon Rep. 

Pennsylvania Rep. 

Virginia Dem. 

Wyoming Rep. 

6 Republicans— 7 Democrats. 

237 



ELECTORAL VOTES IN COMPARISON 





1 


920 


1916 




Rep. 


Dem. 


Rep. Dem 


Alabama (12) 




12 


1^ 


Arizonia (3) 


3 




I 


Arkansas (9) 




9 


c 


California (13) 


13 




Vc 


Colorado (6) 


6 




( 


Conneticut (7) 


7 




7 . . . . 


Delaware (3) 


3 




3 


Florida (6) 




6 


4 i 


Georgia (14) 




14 


1^ 


Idaho (4) 


4 




4 


Illinois (29) 


29 




29 


Indiana (15) 


15 




15 


Iowa (13) 


13 




13 


Kansas (10) 


10 




1( 


Kentucky (13) 




13 


Ic 


Louisiana (10) 




10 


It 


Maine (6) 


6 




6 


Maryland (8) 


8 




i 


Massachusetts (18). 


18 




18 


Michigan (1.5) 


15 




15 


Minnesota (12) 


12 




12 


Mississippi (10) 




10 


IC 


Missouri (18) 


18 




18 


Montana (4) 


4 




4 


Nebraska (8) 


8 




J 


Nevada (3) 


3 




... 5 


New Hampshire (4) . 


4 




4 


New Jersey (14).... 


14 




14 


New Mexico (3).... 


3 




2 


New York 


45 


■■l2' 


45 


North Carolina (12) 


12 


North Dakota (5) . . 


5 




s 


Ohio (24) . . 


24 




..... 24 


Oklahoma (10) 


10 




IC 


Oregon (5) .... 


5 




5 


Pennsylvania (38). . 


38 




38 


Rhode Is] and (5)... 


5 




5 


South Carolina (9).. 




9 


J 


South Dakota (5).. 


5 




5 


Tennessee (12) 


12 




12 


Texas (20) . . . 




20 


20 


Utah (4) 


4 




4 


Vermont (4) 


4 




4 


Virgima (12) 




12 


12 


Washington (7) 


7 




1 


West Virginia (8) . . . 


8 




7 1 


Wisconsin (13) 


13 




13 


Wyoming (3) 


3 
404 




3 


Totals 


127 


254 277 


Required to elect, 266. 







238 



OFFICIAL VOTE OF LOUISVILLE AND JEFFERSON 
COUNTY (5th CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT) FOR 
PRESIDENT, UNITED STATES SENATOR 
AND CONGRESSMAN 

The official count of the vote in Louis\ilIe and Jefferson 
County gives the following majorities for the Fifth District: 
Senator Warren G. Harding 12,156; Richard P. Ernst 14,051, 
Charles F.Ogden, 12,399. 

Completion of the official count at the Courthouse 
shows no change of importance from the figures announced 
election night. Mr. Ernst polled the largest vote, carrying 
both the county and city over Senator J. C. W. Bechkam. 

Mrs. Lelia C. Leidenger led in the total number of votes 
for the Board of Education, her total being 60,180 votes. 
William H. Camp, the other member of the Board, received 
51,989, and Wilson Lovett, negro candidate, 11, 223. 

The University of Louisville bond issue received a majority 
of votes, but fell short of the necessary two-thirds, the 
the total being: For, 32,214 ; against, 22,431. 

The Memorial bond issue received a larger vote, the 
count standing: For, 29,942; against, 16,744. It also failed 
to pass. 

The totals for the city by wards, and county totals in 
the presidential, senatorial and congressional races are giver 
below: 

Presidental 

Ward Harding Cox 

First 3,612 3,334 

Second 3,262 3,69f 

Third 8,139 6,95^ 

Fourth 3,230 1,52J 

Fifth 5,087 3,87-3 

Sixth 2,784 2,74] 

Seventh 2,437 3,50t 

Eighth 2,816 2,29( 

Ninth 3,207 1,20? 

Tenth 5,357 86: 

Eleventh 8,093 5,331 

Twelfth 11,081 11,555 

City total 59,105 46,89! 

County 9,097 9,15'; 

Totals 68,202 56,04( 

Senatorial 

Ward V Ernst Beckhan 

First 3,638 3,261 

Second 3,320 3,55 

Third 8,097 6,841 

Fourth 3,261 1,48^ 

Fifth 5,144 3,77! 

Sixth 2,757 2,74i 

Seventh 2,454 3.4& 

239 



Eighth 2,899 2,28! 

Ninth 3,203 l,18i 

Tenth 5,349 85^ 

Eleventh 8, 159 5, 16( 

Twelfth 11,381 11,04S 



aty total 59,662 45,66i 

County 9,099 9,03: 

Totals 68,761 54,71( 

Congressional 

Ward Ogden Rich- 

mont 

First 3,577 3,28( 

Second 3,201 3,53^ 

Third 8,024 6,981 

Fourth 3,217 1,49J 

Fifth 5,039 3,81t 

Sixth 2,838 2.761 

Seventh 2,396 3,46^ 

Eighth 2,811 2,37c 

Ninth 3,182 l,18f 

Tenth 5,340 854 

Eleventh 8,015 5,18( 

Twelfth 10,918 11,14c 

City total 58,468 46,07] 

County 8,968 8,96e 

Totals 67,436 55.03^ 



Majorities 

For President — Warren G. Harding 12 , 15f 

For United States Senator— Richard P. Ernst 14,05] 

For Congress— Charles F. Ogden 12,39« 



SCHOOL TRUSTEES. 

Mrs. Lelia C. Leidenger 60, 180 votes 

William H. Camp 51,989 votes 

Wilson Lovett fdefeated) 11 , 223 votes, 

Only 2 elected. 



240 



OFFICIAL VOTE BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 
FOR PRESIDENT AND U. S. SENATOR. 



The vote by congressional districts for President and 
Senator follows: 

Cox Harding Beckham Ernst. 

First 51,061 28,347 50,693 28,146 

Second 45,867 36,571 45,649 36,363 

Third 36,166 36,134 36,284 35,874 

Fourth 41,572 38,281 41,289 37,899 

Fifth 56,046 62,208 54.710 68,761 

Sixth 42,701 30,115 39,077 33,899 

Seventh 53,419 35,269 52,964 35,254 

Eighth 37,552 34,448 37,352 34,358 

Ninth 49,701 45,576 49,328 45,445 

Tenth 19,587 33.734 19,273 33,113 

Eleventh 21,061 64,943 20,877 64,277 



Totals 454,497 452,480 449,244 453,226 

Socialists 6,392 

Prohibition 3,062 

Democratic (Cox) Plurality 2,017 

Republican (Ernst) Majority 3 ,982 



KENTUCKY CONGRESSMEN ELECTED 1920. 



U. S. Senator— Richard P. Ernst, Rep., Covington, Ky. 

First District— Allen W. Barkley, Dem., Paducah, Ky. 

Second District— David H. Kincheloe, Dem., Madison- 
ville, Ky. 

Third District— R. Y. Thomas, Dem., Central City, Ky. 

Fourth District— Ben Johnson, Dem., Bardstown, Ky. 

Fifth District— Charles F. Ogden, Rep., Louisville, Ky. 

Sixth District — Arthur B. Rouse, Dem., Burlington, Ky. 

Seventh District — J. Campbell Cantrill, Dem., George- 
town, Ky. 

Eighth District— Ralph Gilbert, Dem., Shelbyville, Ky. 

Ninth District— W. G. Fields, Dem., Olive Hill, Ky. 

Tenth District— J. W. Langley, Rep., Pikeville, Ky. 

Eleventh District— J. M. Robison, Rep., Barbour- 
ville, Ky. 



241 



VOTE ON MEMORIAL AND UNIVERSITY BOND! 
LOUISVILLE, BY WARDS. 



Louis\ille, because of the two-thirds rule, voted dow 
the University of Louisville and the Memorial bonds in tfc 
election Nov. 2. Figures by wards on both propositior 
are as follows: 

University of Louisville Bonds. 

Wards. Yes 

First 2,050 

Second 2,151 

Third 5,925 

Fourth 949 

Fifth 3,492 

Sixth 3,198 

Seventh 3,166 

Eighth 1,665 

Ninth 773 

Tenth 393 

Eleventh 1,829 

Twelfth 6,623 

Totals -. 32,214 



Soldiers' Memorial Bonds. 

Wards. Yes 

First 1,942 

Second 2,112 

Third 5,379 

Fourth 872 

Fifth 2,934 

Sixth 2,875 

Seventh 2,758 

Eighth 1,510 

Ninth 765 

Tenth 520 

Eleventh 1,890 

Twelfth 6,395 

Totals 29,942 



242 






M CO T« «0 t,. 00 

_L _L 1 III 
2 3 ... ^ '*!'*. ^ -^ '*;-*; >c 'o >c id lo «o 



^ Ttl CO »-i ift lAi 



I '^? ^" -- <^c^-i^ 2u^2u^ci.u^2J5; 

< 53 . . . ~ ^ '*' =^ CO CO CO CO CO CO 00 CO CO CO CO CC CO CO c<5 < 

CQ'*-00 

a: 

Q 



5 "SS 






I CO lO «D t~ CO O ( 



I f f ^^S§^Sg{2Kt2St2t2{2g5SSt2-=i2St2g 



5 §• 



11 iJJJJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

§3 -"-^tN!NCOCO-*T}<iOiOCO?Dl-.t-:ooS§S 



243 



I 



INDEX 



Page 
A City in the front 5 

Acreage of Camp Taylor 65 

Adjutant General's Office -.. 17 

Agriculture, Commissioners of 18 

Agriculture, State Board of 19 

Aldermen, Board of 70 

.\mendment, Women's Suffrage 206 

American Cities, Distances Between .62,63 

Americanism proved by Louis\'ille 6 

Amusement and Baseball Parks 84 

Anywhere, Anytime, Louisville 222 

Apartment Houses 81,84 

Appeals, Coiirt of 25 

Appellate Comt and Districts 25 

Area Kentucky, 40,400 Square Miles 40 

Armies, strength of in World War 15 

Assembly (General) of Ky 25 to 30 

Assets and Liabilities of Louisville 46 

Attendance, Ky. State Fair 74 

Athletic (State) Board of Control. 22 

Attorney General (State) 18 

Auditor, State. 17 

Auditorium, Louisville 73 

Automobile Department, State 20 

Automobile (24 Popular Road Trips) 110 to 136 

Ballots Cast in previous Republican and Democratic 

Conventions 163-166 

Bank Clearings, Louisville 80 

Banking Department 21 

Banks and "Trust Companies 78-79 

Base Ball Parks 84 

Battle Field Heroes (Kentuckians) 11,12 

Belgian Relief 7 

Biographical Sketch of Warren G. Harding, Republican 

Nominee for President 167 

Biographical Sketch of Calvin Coolidge, Republican 

Nominee for Vice-President 168 , 169 

Biographical Sketch of James M. Cox, Democratic 

Nominee for President 168 

Biographical Sketch of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Demo- 
cratic Nominee for Vice-President 169 

Birthstones 31 

Blacks, Population of in Leading Cities 184 

Board of Aldermen. _ 70 

Board of Councihnen 70 

Board of Education 69 

Board of Education (State) 18 

Board of Election Commissioners 19 

Board of Health.. 69 

Board of Fire 69 



INDEX— Continued. 

Page 

Board of Trade, Officers, Directors, etc ^ 

Boundaries, Ward 7( 

Bridges..-- 91 

Brief, Lomsville In 4J 

Bureau of Police 6J 

Bushel, Legal Weights per.. _ 10c 

Business Laws 18^ 

Calendar, 1920 -- 2d page of Covei 

Calendar, Perpetual 214, 2K 

Calendar, 1921-.. 3d page of Covei 

Calculations, Interest 10^ 

Camp Taylor 6f 

Camp Taylor, Car Service to lOf 

Canal, Louisville and Portland 91 

Canal, Panama 21i 

Cantonment (Camp Taylor) 6J 

Capital Stock, Banks and Trust Companies 78,71 

Casualties, Ky., in World's War 1( 

Census, New^ ' U." 's"— 1920— Cit'ies " of" To',obb' "and" 

over 186 to 19/ 

Census, Ky. School 199-201 

Census, U.S --.185-211 

Charities and Corrections (State Board of) 1? 

Charity Organizations Welfare League 171 

Charities— Welfare League 26 in One 20^ 

Chief Justices of Kentucky 31 

Churches 8i 

Cities, Distances Between .-- 62-6c 

Cities of Mexico 211 

Cities, Population of 190-19c 

Cities, Ky., Scholastic, Population of 201 

Cities, U. S. of Over 100,000 Population 22c 

Cities, Ky., Voters Registered in 1920 - - .22] 

City Departments 71-7^ 

City Hospital 7' 

City Officials 67, 6J 

City Raiboad Ticket Offices 64 

Clearings, Bank, Louisville 8( 

Clubs 87,8^ 

Collect-on-Deli very Service (Post-office) 101 

Colleges and Schools 8( 

Colored Population --12{ 

Commercial Standing -.- --.51 

Commissioner of Agriculture, Office of 18, IJ 

Commissioners, R. R 24 

Committee of Sinking Fund 2( 

Community Service, War Camp ( 

Compensation Board (State).-. If 

Confederate Pension Department 1^ 

Congressional Districts 3( 

ii 



INDEX--Continued. 



Page 

Congressional District tLouisville), Vote in 145 

Congressional Medal of Honor 12 

Congressmen, Kentucky 30 

Congressmen (Ky.) elected 1920 241 

Congress, Party Divisions .142 

Cox, James M., Biographical Sketch of ..-168 

Consuls and Vice-Consuls 9S 

Copyright Law of the United States 18C 

Council of Defense 6 

Councilmen, Board of 7( 

Counties of Kentucky 3'i 

Counties of Kentucky, Population of. 194, 19J 

Court House and Coimty OflBces Ti 

Court of Appeals 20-2^ 

Courts Ti 

Custodian (State) 2( 

Cyclone, Louisville, 1890 20? 

Daily Papers 7J 

Dates, Nations went to War 1' 

Days from any date 10( 

Deeds Recorded in Louisville, 1919 17^ 

Democratic Ballots cast in previous Conventions 16( 

Democratic Ballot by States for President and Vice- 
President 165,161 

Democratic Candidates for President and Vice-Presi- 
dent Nominated at San Francisco 16' 

Democratic (Cox) plurality 24 

Democratic District Delegates 15' 

Democratic Delegates to National Convention 15i 

Democratic Presidential Electors 15i 

Democratic State Campaign Committee 15; 

Democratic State, Central and Executive Committees. . 15 

Dental College » 

Department of Public Roads -- -. 1 

Depots and Train Connections 6 

Derby, Kentucky, Winners in ...172,17 

Destructive Instnmaents, World's War 21 

Distances Between American Cities. 62, 6 

Distances from Louisville 60-6 

Distinguished Service Cross --1 

Districts, Congressional, of Kentucky 3 

Dixie Highway ... 11 

Educational Facilities of Louisville 5 

Educational (State) Survey Board 1 

Education, State Department of 1 

Election Commissioners 1 

Election in Louisville, Time of 6 

Electoral Vote 1916 - 139-14 

Electoral Vote 1920 23 

Electoral Votes in Comparison 23 

Embalmers, State Board of 2 



Ul 



INDEX— Continued. 



Emblems, State 42 

Evolution of Destructive Instruments, World's War 213 

Executive Marshal 17 

Executive Office 17 

Executive Officers (State) 17 

Embalmers, State Board of 21 

Emblems, State 42 

Fair (State) 19 

Fair (State), Attendance. 74 

Federal Land Bank 79 

Federal Reserve Bank _ 79 

Fire Department 75 

Fire Marshal (State) 17 

Fire Prevention and Rating (State) Department 17 

First Historical, First Things 43 

Fisher's Perpetual Calendar 214,215 

Flag, U. S ..104 

Four Minute Speakers 6 

Flowers Chosen as State Emblems 42 

Forestry and Geology, State Board of. 21 

Freight Depots 64 

French Croix de Guerre 13 

Game and Fish Conunission 21 

Gas Rate Schedule (new) 243 

General Assembly of Kentucky 25-30 

Geology and Forestry Board. 21 

Gold Star Heroes ..9,10 

Governors of Kentucky 32 

Governors of States elected 1920 ..,.-237 

Governor's Staff 22-24 

Grain Receipts and Shipments, Louisville, 1916, 1917, 

1918,1919 176 

Harding, Warren G., Biographical Sketch of 167 

Health, State Board of 21 

Highway, Dixie 112 

Historical Things, First 43 

Historical Kentucky Information. ...: 40 

Historical Louisville Information 43 

Historical Society, State.. _ _ 22 

Heroes, Kentucky War 11 

Home Guards of Kentucky 6 

Honor Roll— World's War 9 

Hospitals.- 85-87 

Hotels 89 

House of Representatives (Kentucky) Districts and 

Members 27-30 

Honor Roll, Louisville 9 

House of Congress, Political Aligimient 142 

How to Deposit Money in U. S. Postal Savings Bank.. 92 

Identification 1 

Illiteracy Commission (State) 18 



IV 



INDEX— Continued. 



Page 

Income on Investments. 106 

Industrial Foundation Fund 73 

Infirmaries, Hospitals, etc... 85 

Information, Useful 179 

Insane (State) Hospitals 21 

Inspector, State 17 

Insurance Commissioner (State) 17 

Insurance on Fourth-Class Parcel Post Mail 101 

Interest Calculations 102-107 

Interurban R. R. Time Tables 107 

Investments, Income on 106 

Itineraries from Louisville 61 

Jackson Highway ...114 

Jefferson Circuit Court 77 

Jefferson Co., Kentucky, Incorporated Places in ..199 

Jefferson Co., Kentucky, Population of. 195-198 

Jefferson County Votes for Senator, etc., in 1918 148 

Jefferson County Votes for Govenor and other Offices in 

1919 150 

Jefferson County Votes for President, United States 

Senator and Congressmen 1920 239,240 

Jefferson County Officers 77 

Judicial Districts 25 

Justices (Chief), of Kentucky _ 31 

Kentuckians Awarded Honors... 12 

Kentuckians Cited for Bravery 13 

Kentuckians Who Distinguished Themselves on the 

Battle Field and Sea... 12 

Kentuckians Who Lost their Lives in U.S. Marine Service 11 

Kentucky Home Guards 6 

Kentucky, Area of 40 

Kentucky Casualties in World's War. 16 

Kentucky Chief Justice 31 

Kentucky Cities, Scholostic, population of. .201 

Kentucky Cities, Voters Registered, 1920 227 

Kentucky Congressmen and Districts 30 

Kentucky Congressmen elected 1920 241 

Kentucky Democratic State Central and Executive 

Committee 1 155 

Kentucky Counties, Population of 194,196 

Kentucky Educational Survey Board 18 

Kentucky Counties, When Made and Taken From 37 

Kentucky Derby Winners In 172,173 

Kentucky, First Regiment 41 

Kentucky General Assembly 25-30 

Kentucky Governors 32 

Kentucky Historical Information 41 

Kentucky Illiteracy Commission 18 

Kentucky Information 40 

Kentucky Leads 36 

Kentucky Official Vote for State Officers, Prohibition, 

Mob law, etc. 15-i 

V 



INDEX— Continued. 



Page 

Kentucky, Population of 41 

Kentucky, Popular Vote in.. 143,144 

Kentucky, Republican State Central and Executive 

Committees 158,159 

Kentucky School Census (Complete) 1920 199 

Kentucky School Census by Counties 200 

Kentucky Presidential Vote 143 

Kentucky Presidential Vote 1920 22S 

Kentucky Presiding Officers, State Senate 34 

Kentucky Speakers of House of Representatives. 35 

Kentucky State Board of Education 18 

Kentucky State Fair 19-74 

Kentucky State Officials....- ..17-36 

Kentucky Statistics, Industrial 176 

Kentucky Tax Commissioners 19 

Kentucky Tuberculosis Association 22 

Kentucky U. S. Senators 33 

Kentucky War Heroes 11 

Kentucky Women of Voting Age 206 

Kentucky's New Tax System 1919 175 

Knights of Columbus Quarters 6 

Labor Department (State) 18 

Land Office (State) 17 

Laws of Business 182 

Legislature, Political Complexion 30 

Legal Weights of Produce per Bushel in the TJ. S 103 

Liberty Loan.. 7 

Libraries 87 

Library Commission (State) 20 

Lincoln Farm ..112 

Live Stock Board (State) 19 

Long Distance Itineraries 61 

Louisville & Interurban Railroad 107 

Louisville & Northern Railway and Lighting Co. 108 

Louisville Auditorium 73 

Louisville and Portland Canal.. 91 

Louisville City Departments 71 

Louisville City Officials 67,68 

Louisville Cyclone ..203 

Louisville, Distances from ..60, 61 

Louisville Historical Information 43 

Louisville in Brief -... 43 

Louisville Law Schools _. 80 

Louisville Mayors 43 

Louisville Medical Colleges 80 

Louisville of To-day 47 

Louisville Official Registration Oct. 8-9, 1918 146 

Louisville Post Office 95 

Louisville, Points of Interest 58,59 

Louisville, Population by Wards 199 

Louisville, Prominent Gatherings in... 66 

vi 



INDEX—Continued. 

Page 

Louisville, Registration (1920) of Women Voters in 224 

Louisville, Total Voters Registered by Wards, 1920... 224 

Louisville Ward Boundaries. -.. 7C 

Louisville Water Works 47-70 

Louisville Election, Time of 67 

Louisville Honor Roll S 

Louisville GoldStar Heroes 9 

Louisville Savings and Serving g 

Louisville Proved Her Americanism (i 

Louisville's Dollars in the Fight 7 

Louisville Citizens, War Contributions of 7 

Louisville, War Time 5 

Louis\ille in World's War, Men, Money and Resources. . 5 

Louisville, Liberty Loan Legion 6 

Louisville Publicity League 73 

Louisville Industrial Fund 73 

Louisville Men Recruited in 5 

Louisville Memorial Commission 73 

Louisville School Children Enrolled in War Gardening. .' 8 

Louisville Official Registration, 191^1919 146-149 

Louisville Votes for Governor and other officers, 1919 ..150 

Louisville Votes for Governor, etc., by Wards 152 

Louisville Votes for President, United States Senator 

and Congressmen 1920 239,243 

Louisville Wealthy People. 177 

Louisville Tobacco Statistics.. ..177 

Louisville, 65 Trucks, Routes all Directions 216-222 

Louisville, Population of 198,199 

Louisville, Population by Wards 199 

Louisville, Deeds Recorded in Louisville, 1919 174 

Louisville Dental College. 80 

Louisville Bank Clearings 80 

Louisville, Assets and Liabilities 46 

Louisville, Recreation and Amusements 53 

Louisville, Registration of Voters. 149 

Louisville Educational Facilities 53 

Louisville and Environment 47 

Louisville Population Statistics 49 

Louisville Industrial Statistics 49 

Louisville Commercial Standing 51 

Louisville New Gas Rate .243 

Louisville Transportation Advantages 52 

Louisville, Condensed Facts of .- 54 

Louisville, Miscellaneous Facts of 54 

Lomsville Fire Department : 75 

Louisville Police Stations 75 

Louisville Banks and Trust Companies 78, 79 

Louisville Public Library 87 

Louisville Bridges 91 

Louisville, Grain Receipts and Shipments 176 

Louisville and Kentucky Statistics. 176 



VU 



INDEX— Continued. 



Page 

Louisville Welfare League of Organizations 171 

Lusitania, Sinking of 208 

Marine, Kentucky Heroes 11 

Map of Louis^^lle, Lincoln Farm, Mammoth Cave. 110, 111 

Maps, War 213 

Mayors of Louisville, 1828 to 1920.. 43 

Medical and Surgical Hints 183 

Memorial Bonds, Vote on 242 

Memorial Commission 73 

Men, Recruited in LouisAille 5 

Mexico 211 

Mexico — States and Principal Cities 212 

Million Dollar Industrial Fund 73 

Mines, State Department of.. 17 

Mob Law, Vote on 155 

Motor Vehicle Department (Kentucky) 20 

Monuments 92 

Morrow's Governor Staff 23 

Nations, Dates When They Went to War 15 

Negro Population 129 

New Gas Rate Schedule 243 

New Railway Rates 202 

Newspapers, Daily 73 

Nurses, Training School for 80 

Office Buildings 20 

Official Kentucky Vote for State Officers 154,155 

Official Vote of Louisville and Jefferson Co., November 

1918 147,154 

Official Vote by Congressional Districts 1920 

Official Vote of Louisville and Jefferson County for 
President, United States Senator and Congressman 

1920 239,240 

Officials, Jefferson County 77 

Officials, Louisville 67,68 

Officials, State 17,35 

Officials, United States 93,94 

Operations— Louisville Tobacco. 177 

Outljing Possessions, U. S. .--.-. 184 

Owl Cars 108,109 

Panama and Canal - 212 

Papers, Dailv 73 

Parcel Post or Fourth-Class Marl and Zones 98-100 

Park Commissioners.. 47-68 

Parks, Pubhc 67 

Passenger Rjtes (Railway) to some Principal Cities 202 

Pension Department (Confederate) 17 

Penal (State) Institutions . 21 

Parks, Amusement and Base Ball 84 

Pharmacy, College of 80 

Pharmacy, State Board of.. . 21 

Points of Interest in or Near the Heart of the City 58 

Points of Interest on the City's Edge 59 

viii 



INDEX— Continued. 



I 



Page 

Police, Bureau of 68 

Police Stations 75 

Popular Road Trips— The Dixie Highway 110-136 

Popular Vote, 1916 - 140 

Population, Kentucky Counties 194-196 

Population— Native and Foreign Born. 126,127 

Population of Blacks in Leading American Cities 184 

Population of U. S. Cities over 1,000,000 population... 223 

Population of Jefferson Co., Kentucky 198,199 

Population of Louisville by wards. 199 

Population of U. S. by Cities 190-193 

Population of States, 1910 Census 186-207 

Population of United States by States, 1920 ..197-198 

Population U. S. Possessions 184 

Population Statistics of Louisville 49 

Portland and Louisville Canal... 91 

Possessions of the U. S 184 

Possessions. U. S. Population of 185 

Postage — Rates of... 97 

Postage Rates to Foreign Countries 97 

Postal Information 92 

Postal Savings Banks 92 

Post Office... - - 94 

Post Office Receipts 95 

Post Office and Stations, Louisville 95,96 

President, Vote for 5th District, Louisville 145 

Presidential Vote, Popular 140 

Presidential Vote in Kentucky from 1828 ..137,138 

Presidential Vote, 1826-1916 137,138 

Presidential Vote in Kentucky, 1789-1820 143 

Presidential Popular Vote in Kentucky 1824-1916 .143 

Presidential Vote bv States 1920 235,236 

Presiding Officers, Kentucky Senate, 1792-1920... 34 

Presidents of United States 193 

Printing Commissioner, State 20 

Prison Commissioners (State Board of Charities and 

Control) 19 

Prohibition, Kentucky Vote on 154,155 

Prohibition Vote in Ky. 1920 241 

Prominent Gatherings. 66 

Publicity League 73 

Public Parks... 67 

Public Roads, Department of 19 

Race Tracks 84 

Racmg (State Commission) 21 

Railroad Commissioners, Districts 24 

Railroad Districts ■ 24 

Railroad Routes, Interurban 107-108 

Raib-oad Ticket Office, City 64 

Railway Passenger Rates to Principal Cities 202 

; of Postage... 97 



IX 



INDEX-Oantinued. 



Page 

Ratification of Women's Suffrage 206 

Real Estate Transfers in Louisville, 1919 ..174 

Recreation and Amusements, Louisville 53 

Red Cross Workers, World's War 6 

Registration of Women Voters in Louisville 1920 224 

Registration of Louisville Voters by Wards 1920 -..224-226 

Registration of Voters, Ky. Cities, 1920 227 

Registration of Voters, 1918 14e 

Registration of Voters, 1919 14? 

Republican State Central Committee 15S 

Republican Ballots cast in previous Conventions 163 

Republican Campaign and Executive Committees, 

Louisville and Jefferson Co 159, 16C 

Republican Candidates for President and Vice-Presi- 
dent of the U. S. at Chicago... 161 

Republican Convention, Chicago, Ballots cast 162 

Republican Delegates to National Convention 158, 15£ 

Republican Majority United States Senator Ernst 234 

Republican Presidential Election 15S 

Republican State Campaign Committee 157-15S 

Republican State Central Committee at Large 15S 

Roads, State Department of 19 

Roosevelt, Franklin D., Biographical Sketch of 169 

Routes, Automobile. 110-136 

Route No. 1 110-114 

Route No. 2 110-114 

Route No. 3— Jackson Highway 114 

Route No. 4— Louisville to Shepherdsville, 20 miles 117 

Route No. 5 — Louisville to Elizabethtown via Shep- 
herdsville, 51.8 miles 117 

Route No. 6 — Louisville to Shelbyyille, 30.5 miles US 

Route No. 7— Lou. to Frankfort via Shelbyville, 51 mi.llS 
Route No. 8— Lou. to French Lick via New Albany 

and the Pacli Pike, 58.3 miles IIS 

Route No. 9— Lou. to Indianapolis via Seymour, 125.9 

miles.. .--.... 12C 

Route No. 10 — Lou. to Springfield via Bardstown, 58.7 

miles 123 

Route No. 11— Lou. to Taylorsville, 32.8 miles. 123 

Route No. 12— Lou. to West Point, 20.5 miles 124 

Route No. 13 — 'Lou. to Harrodsburg and Graham 
Springs via Shelbyville and Lawrenceburg, 74.7 

miles 12J 

Route No. 14 — Lou. to Madison, Ind., on North Side of 

the River, 57.4 miles ..126 

Route No. 15 — Frankfort to Lexington via Versailles 

and old State Pike 127 

Route No. 16 — Frankfort to Lexington via Lexington 

Pike 12S 

Route No. 17 — Lexington to Maysville. 125 

Route No. 18— Lexington to Winchester. 13( 



INDEX- Continued. 



Page 

Route No. 19— Winchester to Mt. Sterling 131 

Route No. 20— Mt. Sterling to Olympian Springs 131 

Route No. 21— Frankfort to Georgetown 132 

Route No. 22 — Lexington to Danville. - 132 

Route No. 23 — Georgetown to Cincinnati 133 

Route No. 24— Louisville to Nashville via Bardstown, 

Buffalo, Cave City, Gallatin 134 

Sanitary Board, State 19 

Sslective Service Members of 6 

Schedule, Truck Route 216-222 

Schools and Colleges.. 80 

School Census of Kentucky 199,200 

Scholastic Population of Kentucky Cities 20 1 

Senatorial Districts 25,26,27 

Senators 25,26,27 

Senators, U.S 33 

Senators (United States) elected 1920 236 

Ship by Truck, 63 Routes 216-222 

Sinking Fund Commission 20 

Sinking of the Lusitania. - 208 

Soldiers' Memorial Bonds, Vote on 242 

Speakers, Kentucky House ..35,36 

Staff, Governor's 22,23 

Stars and Stripes 104,105,106 

State Board of Agriculture.. 19 

State Auditor 17 

State Board of Election Commissioners 19 

State Board of Health 21 

State Emblems. 42 

State Fair Attendance 74 

State Flowers 42 

State Insurance Board.. 17 

State Insurance Commission 17 

State Live Stock Sanitary Board... 19 

State Officials 17-35 

State, Secretary of 17 

State Tax Commission 19 

Stations, Police 75 

Stations, Post Office, Lettered and Numbered 96,97 

Statistics of Louisville and Kentucky for 1919 ...176 

Steamboat Lines 109 

Suffrage, Women's 206,207 

Surgical and Medical Hints 183 

States Ratifying Suffrage -\mendment 206 

State Illiteracy Commission. 1^ 

State Educational Siu-vey Board IJ 

State Commissioner of Agriculture IJ 

State Wide Prohibition, Vote on 15i 

State Historical Society 2^ 

State Board of Examiners - 1| 

States, Population of. _.,.-_ 19i 



INDEX— Continued. 



Pag€ 
State Land Office 17 

State Labor Department -.-. IS 

State Workmen's Compensation Board ... 18 

State Attorney General 1. IS 

State Board of Embalmers 21 

State Department of Banking 21 

State Hospitals for Insane 21 

State (Ky.) Presidential Vote 1920 229,230,231 

State (Ky.)Vote for Unites States Senator 1920 . 232,233,234 

State Penal Institutions 21 

State Auditor's Office 17 

State Printing Commissioner 20 

State Department of Mines 17 

State Racing Commission 21 

State Fair. -... 19 

State Fire Prevention and Rating Department 17 

State Treasurer 18 

State Tuberculosis Commission 22 

State Capitol Employes 22 

State Athletic Board of Control 22 

State Board of Geology and Forestry 21 

State Game and Fish Commission 21 

State Board of Pharmacy 21 

State Library Conunission 20 

Tax Commission (State) 19 

Tax System, Kentucky's New 175 

Theological Seminaries 80 

Tobacco, Louisville Statistics of Operations 177, 178 

Total Number of Immigrants in Specified Years 125 

To the Public 2 

Transportation Advantages of Louisville 52 

Treasurer (State).... 18 

Truck Routes, all Directions (65) Schedule.. 216-222 

Truck Transportation Operating Outside of Louisville.. 220 

Trust Companies 78 

Tuberculosis Commission (State) 22 

University Bonds, Vote on 242 

U. S. Cantonment 65 

U.S. Census 185 

U. S. Civil Service Commission 95 

U. S. Consuls 95 

U. S. Copyright Laws 180 

U. S. Fish Hatchery 74 

U. S. Flag, When and How to Display it 104-106 

U. S. Government Offices 93 

U. S. Marine Hospital 95 

U. S. Population of, 1910-1920 185-200 

U. S. Population of, by States, 1920... ..185-198 

U. S. Population of Outlying Possessions 154 

U. S. Population of Cities, 10,000 and over 186 

U. S. Population of Cities over 100,000 223 



XU 



INDEX— Continued. 



Page 

It '.S., Presidents of. 193,194 
l''. S. Prohibition Director 94 
I nited States Senators (new) elected 1920. 236 
t f. S. Weather Bureau 95 
ll. S. Women of Voting Age, in... ...216,217 
r 'seful Information 179 
t nited States Officers and Officials 94 
* nited States Senators (Kentucky) 33 

J * seful Information 179 

'' niversities-.. --- 80 

?' eterinary Examiners' Members State Board of 18 

? otes by States— Presidential Election, 1916 139 

r' otes for President (Ky.) 1920 229,230,231 

c' otes for United States Senator (Ky.) 1920... 232, 233, 234 

. :*otesbv Wards for Governor, etc., 1919 ..152 

■'ote, Electoral, by States 139 

r otes for Governor and other Officers, Louisville and 

c' Jefferson Co 150 

.' ites by Congressional Districts for President and 

■ United States Senator 1920 241 

)ting Age, Women of 206 

'e in 5th District, for President 145 

:e in Jefferson County, 1918 148 

e on Memorial Bonds 242 

■ e on University Bonds 242 

tes in Louisville by Wards and Jefferson Co ..152 

te of Kentucky for State Officers and Prohibition 

1919 154 

; iters (Women) Registerd in Louisville, 1920 224 

Iters, Total registration of in Louisville by Wards 22 

n?rs registered, Ky. Cities, 1920 227 

es Registered in Louisville, 1919 149 

tes. Fifth Congressional District, 1916 145-147 

Wards of Louisville, Vote for Governor, etc., 1919 152 

'' ar Gardening, Children Engaged in 8 

War Heroes, Kentucky 11 

War Sa\'ings Stamps ...^. 7 

War Time, Louisville 5 

War Work Drive 7 

Ward Boundaries 70 

Water Works System 47-70 

Wealthy People of Louisville 177 

Welfare (Louisville) League 171 

I Welfare League 171,215 

Weightsand Measures 102,103 

When and How to Display the Flag of the United 

States 104,106 

Winners, Place, and Show Horses in Kentucky 

Derby 172,173 

Women Suffrage, Ratification by States 206 

Women Engaged in Sewing — War Time .- 8 



XIU 



INDEX— Continued. 

Pa 

Women's Liberty Loan 

Women ofVoting Age in Kentucky 2( 

Women ofVoting Age in U. S 2( 

Women Voters Registered in Louis\-ille, 1920 2: 

Workers Employed in Louisville Industries J 

Workmen's Compensation Board 

World's War, Valuable Data Concerning Louisville 5- 

World's War, Y. M. C. A. Workers 

World's War, K. of C, Workers 

World's War, Red Cross 

World's War, Council of Defense 

World's War, Selective Service. 

World's War, Four Minute Speakers 

World's War, Home Guards 

World's War Camp Community Service 

World's War Liberty Loan 6 

World's War, Victory Loan 

World's War, Jewish Association 

World's War, Salvation Army 

World's War, Louisville Men Recruited 

World's War, Louisville War Heroes 6- 

World's War, Dates Nations Went to War 

World's War, Strength of Armies in 

World's War, Kentucky Casualties in 

World's War, Kentuckians Decorated for Bravery 

World's War, Evolution of Destructive Instruments 2 

World's War Honor Roll 

Y. M.C.A 

Y.M.H.A.. - - 

Y.W.C.A 

Zones, Parcel Post ....99,1 



XIV 



— -» 1922 •4^— 1 


JANUARY. 


JULY. 1 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T F 


8 


8|M 


T 


W 


T 


P 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 




.. 


.. 








1 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


22 


28 


24 


25 


26 


27 


2S 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


29 


30 


31 






;: 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 26 
.... 


27 


28 


29 


FEBRUARY. 


AUGUST. ( 








1 


2 


3 


4 




1 


2 3 


4 


5 


5 


6 


7 


8 




10 


11 


6 


7 8 


9 10 




12 


Vi 


i:! 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 


14 15 


16 17 


18 


19 


19 


20 


21 


22 


2;i 


24 


25 


20 


21 22 


23 24 


25 


26 


26 


27 


28 










27 


28 29 


30 31 






MARCH. 


SEPTEMBER. 1 








] 


2 


3 


4 












1 2 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 9 


12 


1? 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


". 




24 


25 


26 


" 


28 


29 30 


APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 1 












1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


S 




4 


5 




7 


8 


8 


9 


IC 


11 


12 


13 


14 


s 


1( 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


15 


16 


n 


If- 


19 


20 


21 


16 


n 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


29 


30 


31 










30 




























MAY. 


NOVEMBER | 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




.. 


] 


2 


3 


4 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


B 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


14 


15 


16 


n 


18 


19 


20 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 20 


21 




23 


24 


26 


2iJ 


29 


30 


31 








26 27 


28 


29 


30 






JUNE. 


DECEMBER. | 










1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


4 


6 


6 


7 




9 


10 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


10 


11 


12 1f 


14 


15 


16 


IP 


19 


20 


21 


22 


2S 


24 


n 


18 


19 2f 


21 


22 


23 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




24 
31 


25 


26 27 


28 


'.' 


30 



"The 



^ LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



■n 

014 571 981 i ^ 



CHARLES WHE 



makes an ideal gift for 
either a young or an old 
person. Is gotten up in 
novelty form, artistically 
bound and richly illus- 
trated by Fox. 

A copy should be in 
every home — chucked 
full of laughs. 

"I enjoyed every word 
of it." 

— James Whitcomh Riley. 
Price 50c, mailed anywhere. 



The Standard Printing Co. 



INCORPORATED 

Louisville, Ky.